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Q: taught in China for 7 years.why do i need to return Oz 1 year before i can return. FEC issue

Signed new contract with current school in Ningbo. Now find out the relevant department wont renew my FEC. They say i must return to Australia for 1 year and then i can return to continue teaching.

Have been in China teaching for 7 years. 

First 3 years i taught in Hubei. Second 3 years Wenzhou and present school 1 year.

Does anyone know the correct ruling / law regarding this situation?

 Do i need to return australia or just move to another province, start teaching and renew FEC there.

 

 

4 years 38 weeks ago in  Visa & Legalities - Ningbo

 
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Posts: 1559

Shifu

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Sounds a little fishy.  I've been working in Ningbo for almost 3 years now, but not as a teacher....but I wouldn't think that should matter.  My next renewal's not due until this October.  I know, I'm not much help, but at least this will get you bumped over to the "Latest Answers" page....surely someone will have better input

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4 years 38 weeks ago
 
Posts: 3442

Emperor

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Actually, I thought foreigners had to leave China after five years. It seems you got a bonus two years. Not sure of the reason, but I guess they don't want foreigners getting too comfortable in China.

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4 years 38 weeks ago
 
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Hi.  A cursory google search indicates something along the lines of a '5 year rule'.  But it seems pretty minor according to some accounts; you just have to leave China for 30 consecutive days before your slate is wiped clean and you start again from day 1 upon your return.

 

So based on this, a year in Australia seems way too steep.

 

However like all things here, nothing is concrete, and everything varies according to province etc.  I know a guy in Chengdu for example, worked there for 5 years, was told he was then not allowed work for a further year, so he decided to study instead on a student visa for year 6.  In year 7, he can start working again.

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4 years 38 weeks ago
 
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5 year rule is enforced when they want to, maybe get a new passport with new number and start over in a new province.

 

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4 years 38 weeks ago
 
Posts: 1891

Emperor

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The 5-year rule was originally meant for technology workers...not teachers. This rule seems to be "enforced" when a school wants to get rid of an employee or by clerks who know the rule exists, but don't know the rule is not applied to ESL teachers. Sometimes, just applying again and getting a different (or indifferent) clerk solves this problem. Try, try again.

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4 years 38 weeks ago
 
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