The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
Posts: 125

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Q: China's immigration policy. Is it really that bad?

I was reading an article written by the Chinese spouse of a British citizen talking about her visa interview in the British embassy and I couldn't help but feel relieved that I don't have to go through that much trouble to get a visa in China

 

Do you think that the immigration policy in China is really that bad compared to other countries in the world? 

 

The article is here but is not accessible without vpn

 

http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/account-of-interview-in-british-embassy.html

 

For those of you who cant access it:

 

Account of an interview in a British Embassy, by the spouse of a British citizen #mustread

'I received a phone call on <day> October 2013 and was told that I need to attend a face to face interview in the British Embassy in Beijing on <day> October 2013 at <time>. It was 4 months after we submitted my UK spouse visa application although we meet all the requirements.

'I wanted to confirm my appointment in person before the interview because it’s about the future happiness of my husband and I, I just could not afford to make any mistakes. So I left my hometown, arrived in Beijing two days before the interview. It took me 3 hours and 10 min on the plane, another 5 hours on buses, trains and tubes, so it was about 8 hours in total, the transport cost about £350 return, and the hotel £100 for 3 nights. 

'I arrived in the Embassy in the early morning the day before the interview, and was told by the entrance guards that no advance information of any appointments can be given. It seemed like I would just have to wait at the door until my name was called on the electronic board (if there was one).

'The next day around 7:00am, I was already waiting outside the Embassy, the entrance guards appeared behind the glass door around 7:50am, but again, they still did not know whether I had appointment or not.

'A young man came around 8:00am, standing against the glass door whilst staring at the empty corridor which leads to the lifts. I could see an anxious expression in the stillness of his posture. He came from Guangzhou (which is about 2,200km away from BeiJing), had an interview a month ago for his student visa, but never heard a word ever since. The British university had informed him that the opportunity for his study would have to be closed within 10 days if he still had no visa. He thought he might be able to catch the ECOs in the corridor and to enquire about the outcome of his last interview.

'As I had seen the entrance guards appear behind the glass door without passing the corridor so I assumed that there might be another entrance nearby. But the young man waited until the corridor packed with the Chinese applicants. He could not accept that no ECOs would have entered the office via this crowd. It was sad to see that he finally left the corridor in abject disappointment.

'Fortunately nothing went wrong and my interview started at 8:50am. The interview room was the size of a small prison cell, a see-through glass wall cut in the middle, one side for the interviewer, another side which links to the back office, is for the ECO and an interpreter.

'The ECO was a youngish man, dressed in a gray-green jumper, his face was cold and expressionless, marked with the steel determination, wishing to detect as much false evidence from his prey. He must have been trained in this way for a decent length of time; I felt the coldness immediately, as if I was entering a freezer whilst being eyed by an experienced guard dog.

'The questions started with the dates: how long did you stay in the UK? When did you first arrive in the UK? What date is your ex-husband's birthday? When did you get married?  When did you first meet? What date is your current husband's birthday...etc.

'His method of questioning had a very strong military style, there were no gaps between each question. Someone like me with a low pitch and a slow speed, perhaps extremely bad at numbers and dates would definitely have difficulties to adapt to this style. 

'My story was not too complicated. In short, I came to the UK with my ex-husband on a dependant visa in 2010. He thought I was being unfaithful, then threw me out in the street 6 months after I arrived in the UK. I survived by myself and kept working as a freelance writer. In October 2011, I applied for leave to remain visa based on three reasons: 1, my fear of returning back to China as a writer and an independent film maker who had touched on some sensitive issues in my work during that period. 2, my former marriage broke down because of my ex-husband's domestic violent behaviour . 3, I was in a relationship with a British artist (at that time). 

'So I sent off my leave to remain application to my solicitor at the end of October 2011. After 2 months, I was told that the payment for the visa fee did not go through, it was already January 2012. My solicitor said it should be successful if I retry. So I did. However, I did not hear anything from the Home Office afterwards (no ref, no tracking number, I wrote a few letters to them but received no answers) until April 2013. 

'During the following nearly 15 months, I met my current husband David in June 2012. I moved in with him in  November 2012. I heard nothing until was April 2013, when I got the refusal letter. David asked me to marry him immediately after reading my refusal. So we got married in China on 13th June 2013 and submitted my spouse visa application the next day.

Here is the summary of Q&As between the ECO and me:

For what reason did your former marriage break down? ----I explained the situation and the domestic violence incident.

Why did you not return to China after your relationship broke down?----Because there were a lot of negotiations, the divorce procedure often takes a long time. I received my divorce papers from the court in the May 2012. It was a year and an half after he threw me out in the street.

Did you report to the Home Office about your relationship breakdown?----No, I did not, but my ex-husband did.

Do you have a letter from the Home Office?----No, I don’t.

After your relationship broke down, you should return to China, you can negotiate via emails and phone calls, you can divorce in China! Why did you stay in the UK?!-----Yes, we could have divorced in China ( I forgot to say that I was in a homeless situation, I did not even think of where to divorce. Where to get a roof and a piece of bread certainly was more urgent...) I was afraid of returning to China because of the nature of my work, then I was told by my solicitor that I did not need to go back to China immediately, I could apply leave to remain under Article 8.

What Article 8? Do you know what's Article 8?!-----That's the category that my solicitor suggested. Can you explain to me what's Article 8 ?

Did you do any research before you submitted your application?----I did a bit afterward.

You did after you submitted your application!? So what was the reason you wanted to stay in the UK?----As I just said, the nature of my work, the domestic violence incident, and I was in a relationship, I think three of them might make a reason? 

What would have happened if you had  returned to China?----That was a difficult time for many Chinese artists and writers. You live in Beijing, you should understand. The artist Ai Weiweidisappeared for quite a while. The human rights lawyer XXX who I filmed in my documentary also disappeared during that time - soon we found out he was in jail for about 8 months. Another human rights lawyer XXX who I was investigating through my documentary had also disappeared for years.

When did you make this documentary?----From 2005 to 2010.

When did you start to make documentaries related to sensitive issues?----About 2004. I made a film about people made redundant and who asked for compensation...

Why did you not mention your work in your first application (2010)?-----because I was just a dependant on a dependant visa, it was nothing to do with my work.

Have you had any threats?----I think the most severe one was when I was about to screen my newly made documentary in February of 2010, the place and time was already set, I was on my way to the screening, then I was told that ‘I cannot screen my film, the security police are looking for me.’ so I had to shut my phone off and randomly pick up some of my stuff then flee to HK that evening.

What date was that day?----I cannot remember exactly...

You had to flee to HK you said you cannot remember?!!—(I have problems with numbers and dates,  it was one of my learning difficulties) well, I remember that it was just a few days before I flew to the UK.

So you had got your visa by then? ----Yes.

What did you do when you were in the UK?----I wrote columns for Chinese magazines,  I also had some commissions for my journalist work.

What did you write in your columns?----The great culture of Britain: art, galleries, exhibitions, fashion, artists...

Did you do anything else? ----I  taught a bit of yoga occasionally, I was a qualified yoga teacher.

Was it like a part time job then?----yes.

How much do you earn every month? roughly?-----About £700 or £800 if I did not work hard.

If you did not work hard?!-----Yes, if I work hard I can earn much more than that. I was also doing a bit of volunteer work in xxxx centre, they have some helplines for domestic violence victims and refugees. 

But you are not a psychologist or therapist, what did you do there?----I was just helping the case workers. 

How ?----There are some helplines there, and I can speak Mandarin...

So you were just picking up the phone calls then?-----Not just like that, I was also doing some paperwork. i.e. help them to fill the forms etc.

Fill the forms to who?-----To the government.

So you were helping people claiming benefits then?!----Not quite. We...The centre gives the information about benefits to people. But mostly we just help those victims or refugees, as some of them are homeless, they need to seek a place to stay or a shelter to...

So you were helping people to claim benefits!?----Not directly...

Indirectly then, said the ECO. He was recording my answers by typing them into a computer in front of him, 'It's just a bit of charity work...'I replied, I was already angry at myself as I am not good at self-defense. He was not looking at me at all but just kept typing whilst spitting out a sentence firmly: I know this kind of charity!

So when did you meet your current husband?----You mean face to face? It was <day> of June 2012. 

Where did you meet ?----Cambridge.

How was that?----It was quite sweet, we just keep talking endlessly.

How did you meet each other?----Through a poetry website. 

What was the website called?----spinewriter...as I remember. He was doing an online reading along with other English poets. His work contains a lot of oriental elements, also the way he spaces his poems reminds me of the Chinese ancient paintings. So I left him a msg...

You left him a msg?!-----Yes. Just to let him know how I feel about his work and to ask him whether he could introduce me to more English contemporary poems...

When did you start your relationship?----After the first date...

You called it a date?-----Yes, what's wrong with it? so after the first date we kept seeing each other, back and forth between London and Cambridge. Then he attended my talk.

When was that?----The end of June 2012. 

How was that?----He told me he really liked my work and gave me a lot of compliments, and he told me how brave I was. 

So when did you start your relationship?----- I think we started our relationship  after that day. 

Why was that?-----Because that was the first time he showed his affection to me.

Did you move in with him?----Yes, I did.

When was that?----Nov. 2012.

Does he have a car?----He had a car, it was broken, so he threw it away. we have decided to get a new one soon.

What colour was the car?---I don't know.

You don't know the colour of his car?!----How do I know?! I have not seen the car. he rides a bike.

So does he have a car? Do you understand my question?!----Yes, he does not have a car.

That's it, that's what I was asking. so how long does it take him from his work to his place by bike?-----30 min.

Where did he live before?----In Cambridge.

What street?-----I don’t know, I’ve never been to his old flat.

Where does he live now?----He lives in XXXX.

How to spell it?------X X X X.

What's the address?-----1-0-2 XXXX

Can you not look at your notes! Try to remember by yourself ok?-----Yes, yes, I have put the notes down.

Repeat the address again!-----1-0-2 XXXX

How long has he been living in this address?-----About 4 years. He bought it 4 years ago.

So he owns the flat?----Yes. but as soon as I moved in with him, I started to pay half of the mortgage.

Where did you get money to pay half of the mortgage?!-----I work...I always have commissions. I have been working for 20 years! Half of the mortgage is just £300!

Does your husband have a university degree?----Yes.

Where did he study?----London University.

Which London university?----He did tell me the name of the university, but I cannot remember, somewhere close to West Ham...

(Then more questions about  my husband. Such as: How many people in his family? What's his job title at work? What does he do for his work? Where was he born? etc.)

When did you decide to get married?----On the date I received my refusal.  It was my husband’s birthday. I told him I can no longer stay here. He said: Don't go! I don't want you to go !Would you marry me?

So when you received your refusal, you decided to marry him?-----He decided to marry me!! I did not ask him to marry me! 

Have you talked about living in China before?----Yes, but please imagine that one of the best universities has spent 10 years to train him as a professional xxx, if he has to teach English somewhere which is thousands of miles away just for three meals, don’t you think it's a bit of a waste? And what about his elderly parents?

Is your husband willing to sacrifice all these for you?----Yes. I think no matter what, we will be together.

Why do you think so?-----Because we are married, and we are committed to each other.

How long do you want to stay in the UK?-----...Until the end of the day? 

What do you mean ‘the end of the day’?!------Until we get old, until we die...

Are you satisfied with the interview that I have conducted with you?----Yes. But please understand that we really miss each other...(no comment from the ECO)

David has a flying phobia!  I cried out.

What?!  he just needs to fly once! Said the ECO ----Yes, but what about the job he loves?! What about his elderly parents?!

There wer no more comments from the ECO, that's the end of the interview. I was told on the phone that I can bring as much evidence as I need in this interview, as I have just sold my flat, I wanted to provide proof of the money I have received recently, which shows in my current bank statements, but it was refused. The ECO told me that because I have already submitted my bank statement in the first place, so the same evidence won’t be accepted again.

So  I submitted a few more family photos, some Christmas cards that I drew for our common friends, a Mother's Day card I drew for David's mother's day, and the email records between us during this separation
time.

Then I left the Embassy in tears. 

 

6 years 30 weeks ago in  Visa & Legalities - China

 
Answers (20)
Comments (12)
Posts: 153

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

That's an interesting article and having a Chinese spouse myself I can relate to the stress and anxiety Chinese must go through to get a visa for other countries. In comparison, my stress and worries about Chinese visa are nothing. Having said that though, many countries especially in the West allow Chinese nationals to apply for long-term visas on the merit of being married to a foreign citizen. They don't ask for ridiculous amounts of investment, or years of contributions to society. Despite being strict and subjecting applicants to prison-like interrogations, they at least consider granting long-term visas to regular people. I can't say the same about China. Unless you're a multi-millionnairre who's done years of business with China or are an overseas Chinese, there's no hope in hell of getting anything longer than a 1 year visa even if you're married and have kids with a local.

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 1198

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

these problems occur through unhonesty and weird situations: e.g. i dont get a visa, ok marry me

 

seriously that is not a good startoff to apply for a visa. Many visas are sold through fake marriages in europe and us.

Sure it is unfair for those who dont marry for the visa ( i have the same prob)

getting a visa in china is also no fun and even though no one even wants to be chinese

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 1893

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Rule #1: Never marry someone who has more problems than you do. The article is not a written by a "typical" applicant but by someone who knowingly went against Chinese policies. A visa interview is like any job interview: how much do you know about the company (country) and your employer (husband/wife/school)? Or, take another, let's say a more diplomatic approach - you flip China the bird, China immediately restricts visa and makes life more difficult for people from that nation. China does not need more people, does not have to kow-tow to other countries. Other countries, however, seem to walk on eggshells when it comes to dealing with China. So, this woman flips China the bird, already has one failed marriage under her belt and marries a guy who, according to her own explanation, was a tad hasty in offering marriage. What's the problem?

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I have very little sympathy for this woman.

She wants a visa, therefore she has to answer the questions.

The Foreign Office employee is doing his job by trying to find out if she is legitimate in her application or not. she is not being victimised but her unusual circumstances are bound to attract a much more thorough investigation than your average person.

This was not an average interview and should not be taken as such by anyone.

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I would say that the visa refusal is justified.

 

I know that the British visa interviews are tough.  As a result of personal experience, I also understand why.

 

Add to this, the UK has more people wanting to go there then any other nation/country in the world - including the US.

 

We have the EU to contend with.  We have a Commonwealth which is made up mostly of countries of the former empire.

 

We have a health system which, despite it's faults, is the envy of the world due to it being largely free at the point of access.

 

The requirements etc of a visa have already cost me one marriage, but I don't for one minute blame the UK or the Home Office/Border Agency for any of this.

 

The fact that you were naive to get married after having your original visa application denied is just suicide in visa application terms.  That stinks of an arranged marriage for the sake of a visa.  The British Government will never buy in to that simply for the reason that so many illegitimate marriages occur in the UK for visa reasons.  Add to this the fact that, due to the number of people who wish to go to the UK, only one reason is needed to refuse/decline a visa etc.

 

Some British people will say the UK isn't paradise, but it is a damn sight better than 95% of countries on Earth, and the only reason why it is suffering now is because of the number of foreign piss-takers we've had over the last 10-15 years.

 

I accept I will get a bit of a hostile reaction to this post, but the above woman made so many errors.  She should have learnt more about her husband-to-be so that she can give quick straight answers.  They are looking for only slight discrepancies to be able to decline you.

 

Finally, I will finish by stating that, as I have done in other threads, that it is disgusting that genuine lovers should suffer because of those who have ill-intentions, and because of those who have money thus enabling them to get in to other countries such as Australia without speaking a word of the required language (English).

 

Tourist visas are fine.  We understand they are for visits, but if you want to stay, at least have a good reason, and try and show that you belong as part of your desired destinations society.  Learning the language and having some respect and knowing the dos and don'ts would all be advantageous too.

 

Sorry everyone, but as someone who has suffered a lot because of similar, I had to rant.

 

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Umm certainly domestic violence was the route to take.

 

Think you botched it for yourself, the story you gave the guy reeked of unintentional desperation. BTW suspected arranged marriages is a major red flag.

Read today that: Article 8 appeals, the appeals process and arranged marriages in particular are being tackled with a new proposed Bill.

 

UK is tightening up. 

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The really cool thing about China is that we are free to leave. 

For me, it's been really easy getting visa's. It's just been formalities. 

If China, or any other country chose to impose weird rules for immigration, then by all means. If people for that reason turn their back on that country and the country will descend into darkness isolated from the rest of the world, then that is a choice done by it's leaders. 

I think the above example, the applicant could be a bit more cooperative. Some of the answers, despite being correct, could be seen as sarcastic, trying to be funny, or belittle the person conducting the interview. 

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 120

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Foreigners married to citizens do not have working rights. This is commonly given in other places.......like Japan and may I dare say, Taiwan. In Japan, someone who is married to a citizen can get any job, including for instance working at a KFC or a 7-11.

 

In China, a foreigner married to a spouse does not have any rights beyond that they can get up to a one year visitor visa. The local government does not have to give the one year visa, an can give three months, six months or nothing at all. One cannot work legally just because  a foreigner is married to a local. Well, before we condemn China for being jerks, other nations do not honor full married rights.

 

However, in Thailand, a foreigner cannot legally own property. Want a business? Get a Thai partner. There is some protection to have a Thai spouse, but Thailand is strict about foreigners owning anything besides the clothes on their backs. There is loopholes and whatnot.

 

Taiwan does, as long as one gets a CBC and everything checks out after 5 years.

 

The other China laws are really not too harsh. Basically after years of being somewhat "laid back" on rules and laws, China is cracking down hard because a-holes have abused the system! and people have been jerks here and worse. Have a job. Respect the laws. Do not show your butt. To defend China, what in the new regulations is really out of line or crazy. Nothing really. One big thing is that they are cracking down on people working on tourist/L visas. I have. Guilty. I am married to a Chinese citizen and I worked illegally for a year in 2009 on an L. 

 

I have also gotten a Z visa from Shanghai when I worked in Hangzhou Because the school I worked for has franchises in Shanghai and the boss did not "have the right" to hire foreigners, so he floated the visa to the home office in Shanghai. I have also worked part t me jobs with companies who did not sponsor my visa and there was no problem or fear ...(Gawd, I miss the old days....). I had a legal Residence Permit. Chinese know all the legal mechanisms and loopholes to solve any minor problems.

 

Not anymore. The economy is going down. Too many foreigners now. Criminal background checks because of pedophiles, which screws those who have been here for years who was busted for a DUI 17 years ago and are pacing the floor with a life they love and embrace because their own asshole government holds it over them. But for those who have been completely law abiding or who was never was never caught for anything, no biggie. No problem. People can still work side jobs, I do not think that much issue unless they "crack down" or another payoff.

 

if someone is clean, the new visa rules are no biggie at all.

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

very interesting story- it should  show some Chinese people - nerve easy life to live in foreign country

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Her current husband asked to marry her the day she got the rejection letter. That alone is cause for rejection.
Add to it her "uncomplicated" story, her husband kicked her out because he thought she was having an affair. But they divorced because of domestic violence?
Reading her story , you can clearly see that she is manipulative and would say or do anything to stay in the UK. Her stating that she did not contact the home office but her ex did is also a key.
Kudos to the UK

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 5600

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Attention all visa seeking ladies, go with American. The women s rights groups have a strangle hold of the government

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 4985

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Outside of students, most Chinese in the U.S. aren't here legally. Most students overstay and disappear illegally. Since our government is so politically correct, we don't actually enforce immigration laws. We just leave them alone.

 

Too many Chinese refuse to respect any laws when they go abroad. Countries have to keep strict laws to keep them out. Of course, it doesn't do anything about those snake-heads.

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 2391

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Look, I know how hard it can be to try and go through immigration paperwork..... but, seriously!

 

"Which university? I cannot remember." Huh? WTF is that about!? You can't pass that off as being bad with dates.

 

When it comes to my partner I can tell you without having to even THINK about notes;

1. Which high schools he went to.

2. Which one he liked and why, which one he hated and why.

3. His final year results.

4. His favourite final year teacher and why. 

"5. How many and which universities he applied to and why. 

6. When he was accepted to all three, why he chose to reject an Oxbridge acceptance in favour of his local uni. Bonus points: why he also rejected the third option - another more prestigious one than the one he chose. 

7. Why he f*cked up uni the first time.

 

8. Why he chose to go back after a few years.

9. How he found his core area of study interest.

10. The contents of his thesis (i edited the bloody thing - girlfriend points!)

11. Why he doesn't really work in the same area as his area of study. 

12. His future study plans. 

13. What he wishes he had studied, as opposed to what he did study, and why. 

 

My point here is that in a genuine relationship that had lasted for a decent length of time, you would expect MUCH better answers than the ones she gave. 

 

As a final point, allow me to point out that UK immigration laws are crazy tight generally. Me, myself as the long term partner of a UK national (and marriage would not help), I would not be able to migrate to the UK with him because he does not have a large sum of money in a British bank and/or a salary well above the average for his part of the world. Their government does not make

 

 

 

 

 

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 2391

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Sorry... the rest of that was ... "does not make it easy and does not make exceptions."

 

Australia apparently does not routinely do visa interviews any more and I'm sorry for it. It would make it much easier for those of us with legitimate foreign partners.

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 2391

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Carl, instead of an interview we have to provide a forensically detailed and somewhat invasive amount of detail about our lives (including living arrangements, former partner, private emails, private photos, private financial arrangements). I'd much rather do the damned interview - neither of us have any doubts that an interviewer would realise we're genuine in the flesh, but having our last few years dissected by someone when we don't get to explain in person is deeply unappealing. 

Report Abuse
6 years 30 weeks ago
 
Posts: 307

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I think 'David' is buried under a patio somewhere, next to her other ex.. she sounds insane!

Report Abuse
6 years 29 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1053045/italy-news-giuseppe-conte-UN-global-compact-for-migration-Marrakech

 

yes, let the UN control each member countries immigration policies, outstanding idea, What could possibly go wrong with the wisdom of all leaders coming to a "consensus" with out good evidence or facts to back up the policy, come on folks, be a good progressive liberal, its the right thing to do.?

Report Abuse
1 year 23 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The UK visa process contributed to the breakdown of my marriage. I hate the UK Tory government with every fibre of my being.

Report Abuse
1 year 23 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The UK visa process contributed to the breakdown of my marriage. I hate the UK Tory government with every fibre of my being.

Report Abuse
1 year 23 weeks ago
 
Posts: 7204

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Good resurection ambi.. Noticed nobody above actually stated the obvious. China does not do immigration.

I was talking to a mate at the weekend. Been here since 1990, has factories etc.. He wants to take Chinese Citizenship. His entire adult life has been here.. nope. Foreigner.

But do know a few British citizens who used to be Chinese citizens.

Report Abuse
1 year 23 weeks ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs