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Q: Do you think, you are good as an English teacher in China?

This one is funny ...

 

As I was in China, I spotted that Chinese understand English their way ...

 

OK, please, read this:

 

Massive Scandal Erupts In China Over "Racist" UBS "Chinese Pig" Comment 

"Not only did it not offer a sincere apology by saying that this was about consumer prices and higher pork prices, but also implied that Chinese people could not read English properly."

 

Paul Donovan, UBS top economist talked about Chinese inflation print ... and he said:

 

"Chinese consumer prices rose. This was mainly due to sick pigs. Does this matter? It matters if you are a Chinese pig. It matters if you like eating pork in China. It does not really matter to the rest of the world. China does not export a lot of food. The only global relevance would be if Chinese inflation influenced politics and other policies. "

 

OP: On the side note, Chinese consumer prices rose and were mostly driven by 14.4% Y-O-Y higher prices for pork.

 

To be sure, we didn't find Donovan's comment offensive, racist or excessive in any way - and was generally representative of his caustic and dry wit - yet someone else did. In fact, quite a few humorless someone elses.

Shortly after we tweeted UBS' snide take on China's inflation, our tweet made its way all the way into the mainland, where it caused quite a stir, and resulted in a furious backlash against the largest Swiss bank. Here is what China's notoriously globalist tabloid said on Thursday morning:

 

"UBS chief global economist Paul Donovan used distasteful and racist language to analyze China’s inflation in a recent UBS report, sparking uproar across Chinese social media. Chinese netizens called for an official apology from #UBS."

 

His comment draw an uproar on Chino-media, Global Times and all ... : 

 

But it was too late, as by then Donovan’s remarks had sparked outrage on social media sites in China, with users saying the comment humiliated Chinese people. At least three public accounts published articles about the report on WeChat, drawing more than 10,000 hits. Screen grabs of the report also circulated on chat groups. Some users posted a link to a UBS web page for filing complaints.

 

 

Native English (yes, YOU!) are lousy English teachers ...  ... in China. ...

22 weeks 4 days ago in  Arts & Entertainment - China

 
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Yes,

 

I have this logical discussion with students and some teachers all the time and of course i get the blank stare, deer in the headlights look.

 

So student when did you start learning English? grade 3,  no, no, full sentence

I started or began learning English in grade three of primary school.

 

Great excellent sentence.

 

Now student

How many students were in your English class?

 

60

 

no, no, a sentence

 

My English classes usually (no r in usually) were about or (academic, approximately) 60 students in the class.

 

How long was class?

40 minutes, no, no,

My English classes were approximately 40 minutes.

 

So student asian math wizard. lets forget English a minute.

 

word problem

 

If the teacher does nothing for a 40 minute class and every student gets a fair amount of time to say something in English, how much time do you get to talk?

 

60 students 40 minutes yes teacher we all get 40 seconds to talk.

 

So if the teacher talks half the class you get 20 seconds to talk each, correct

 

Yes teacher,

 

Gee, I wonder why nobody can speak English.

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22 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Yes,

 

I have this logical discussion with students and some teachers all the time and of course i get the blank stare, deer in the headlights look.

 

So student when did you start learning English? grade 3,  no, no, full sentence

I started or began learning English in grade three of primary school.

 

Great excellent sentence.

 

Now student

How many students were in your English class?

 

60

 

no, no, a sentence

 

My English classes usually (no r in usually) were about or (academic, approximately) 60 students in the class.

 

How long was class?

40 minutes, no, no,

My English classes were approximately 40 minutes.

 

So student asian math wizard. lets forget English a minute.

 

word problem

 

If the teacher does nothing for a 40 minute class and every student gets a fair amount of time to say something in English, how much time do you get to talk?

 

60 students 40 minutes yes teacher we all get 40 seconds to talk.

 

So if the teacher talks half the class you get 20 seconds to talk each, correct

 

Yes teacher,

 

Gee, I wonder why nobody can speak English.

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22 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Is it bad English, rubbish translation to Chinese, or just despirate Chinese media looking to whip-up Nationalist fervour? 

 

Everytime I see one of these 'faux-outrage' stories about what someone allegedly said about Chinese people, I'm reminded just how much what someone ponits at is more a reflection of themselves than what has actually been said. Let's remind ourselves of some facts about China:

 

1) Chinese media has no problem being overtly racist towards non-Chinese. No Chinese personality has ever been reprimanded for saying appalling things about foreigners. Comedians routinely make fun of caricatures of different races. And Chinese politicians have said some pretty horrendous things about non-Chinese. When they are so overtly racist, it's little wonder they assume everyone else is racist towards the Chinese.

 

2)The black-white issue. Not racism, but the constant flipping between two opposing views. There is no gray here, not consideration that things are not cut and dried, that there's a huge gulf between racist and non-racist. Here it's either love Chinese people, or hate Chinese people. Try saying you prefer Indian food next time you're asked "Do you like Chinese food?" Liking something more is seen as hating something else.

 

3) Baidu Translate is terrible. Very few of the objectors will be able to read the English, and even of they could, most resort to just translating with Baidu. The number of times I've sent innocuous messages to Chinese friends, and them getting upset because what I say in English translates badly into Chinese. In the article there are two sentences, clearly divided. What's the betting Baidu puts them together to mean more like "It matters if you're a Chinese pig and like eating pork in China." 

 

4) They so desperately want to take offence that they won't even consider that there's no way, I mean absolutely NO WAY, the UBS Economist would have written anything potentially racist. In the West people lose their jobs for writing racist or sexist messages. Businesses won't allow their name to be damaged by an employee, let alone a high ranking employee, writing something that would damage their brand image. Their 'apology' is just doing what needs to be done when dealing with children who won't play fair. 

 

Yet again this is all down to Chinese Media attempting to raise nationalist fervour to push any non-Chinese company out of China. 

 

As for us being bad English teachers. Yes, yes we are. Most Middle and High Schools have ESL Teachers for nothing more than face, with 40 minutes a week per class, and no one really caring what the ESL teacher does, because their lessons won't help in the slightest with the Chinese tests. The textbooks are full of grammar errors, their tests are even worse (how many of us have seen the multiple choice quizes that, due to no context, have more than one possibly correct answer, yet students are expected to remember the 'right' answer their Chinese Teacher has  taught them, they are not encouraged to read extensively, their writing is rarely practiced, and students just copy each others homework. You can attempt to fight against the system and actually be a great teacher, but you're going to have a bad time unless you luck out in a training centre that wants you to be different. But there's few of them here, you're just a money making face, the 'real' teaching is done by Chinese S.A.'s behind your back.

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22 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Are Native English teachers in capital any better ...?

https://news.yahoo.com/1-haitong-intl-securities-cuts-052925718.html

 

Haitong Intl Securities cuts business ties with UBS after pig comment

"BEIJING/SHANGHAI, June 14 (Reuters) - Haitong International Securities Group Ltd said it has cut ties with UBS Group AG, following a comment about Chinese pigs made by the Swiss bank's global chief economist that was perceived by some as a racist slur."

 

Haitong International has suspended all collaboration with UBS, including corporate finance and trading, the Hong Kong-listed firm said in an email to Reuters on Friday.

"There is not a clear timetable on when to resume the collaboration, which is subject to the management's decision," Haitong International said.

"Regrettably, this information (UBS' apology) is not only insincere, but also arrogant, again hurting the feelings of Chinese people," it said in an open letter to the UBS board.

It wasn't bad translation, he he ....

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22 weeks 3 days ago
 
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https://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-china-trade-war-preventing-meat-com...

 

 

 Article from Market Watch with explanation what Donovan was talking about.

 

Are you Chinese blind? I know myopia, buTT ... this is too much ...

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22 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Minor Official

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Come on, let's call a spade a spade.

This article was deliberately misinterpreted to play yet another glass hearted victim card.

This continuous desire to find something to be offended by is embarrassing to witness becoming the new normal.

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22 weeks 3 days ago
 
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https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-17/ubs-loses-chinese-bond-deal-ov...

 

A perfectly innocent comment about "Chinese pigs" has now cost UBS millions of dollars in lost revenue and one chief economist, even as the cowardly Swiss bank refuses to back its employee knowing perfectly well he has done nothing wrong.

* * *

The most bizarre and outright ridiculous conflict to have emerged in recent months, that between a grammatically challenged China and UBS's chief economist, Paul Donovan, who in a note last week commented on "Chinese pig" inflation which a few overly sensitive Chinese commentators (with a 780 GMAT score) immediately interpreted as a personal attack against Chinese civilization (it wasn't) continues to escalate, and even though UBS put Donovan on a leave of absence, on Monday one of China’s biggest state-owned infrastructure companies excluded UBS from a bond deal due to the ongoing frenzy over the chief economist's use of the phrase “Chinese pig.”

The decision, first reported by Bloomberg, by China Railway Construction, marked the first known case of a corporate issuer distancing itself from UBS over last week’s comment by economist Paul Donovan. As reported here on Friday, his sarcastic comment - which was not at all meant to slight Chinese citizens - on the swine flu epidemic led to a public uproar in China even as some on Wall Street said the reaction was overblown.

 

Meanwhile, the Financial Times writes overnight that "UBS must resist social media bullying over ‘Chinese pig’ comment":

... cultural sensitivity is important for any multinational. But it is an absurdity to translate an innocent English phrase in a certain way and then take offence at it. Mr Donovan’s original remark was merely a factual explanation of what has caused inflation — swine flu — followed by a droll aside that inflation more generally was not a problem and therefore that only pigs, because of the risk of flu, need worry. The explanation rather kills the witticism.

Mr Donovan can feel rightly sore about his enforced leave of absence, though if UBS continues to kowtow, and accedes to demands to convert suspension into sacking, it will be another level of injustice.

...

UBS is naturally keen to protect its business in China. In response to similar instances in the past, western banks have acted decisively — or brutally, depending on your point of view. In 2006 Morgan Stanley parted company with respected economist Andy Xie, after he made critical comments about Singapore which were leaked to the authorities.

UBS cannot go down the same path. Mr Donovan is highly rated, has had a 26-year career at the bank and has done nothing wrong. His employer must stand by him and resist a misguided bullying campaign stoked by social media and mistranslation.

For once we agree with the FT.

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22 weeks 20 hours ago
 
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