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Q: End of golden expat era, declared by major chinese newspaper

"Rising living costs, new visa rules and a move towards hiring locals are making life on the mainland harder for foreigners, expats say".

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2039288/locals-come-first...

It is looking not so good anymore for people planning to go to China....

5 years 49 weeks ago in  Business & Jobs - China

 
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I can understand top talented jobs are going away and the cost of living isn't matching the salaries people earn now. But ESL will always be here and always will be needed. I heard news like this in 2009, and here I am hearing it again. Remember in China the golden days end for the weekend and the golden days start again on Monday. Don't think too much about it.

Curiousdude:

well said!

5 years 49 weeks ago
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DBushiri:

Indeed the market demand is really unsatisfiable, but the worrying part is that the PRC doesn't give a shit about the market and makes it own rules.

They have their own agenda and I have no idea what their stances and plans are for the future, but sadly in the end the PRC has the last word, even if the markets are crying for more foreigners.

5 years 49 weeks ago
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ironman510:

For any sign of the end is when we actually start hearing groups or small hand fulls of teachers reporting to us or us witnessing them say: "I was told to leave, I'm a B class talent and I was replaced by a new type of A class talent." ( FYI, We're a long long way from that, I do believe A class and B class talents will be changed or modified a bit after a year or so.)

5 years 49 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

Yes and no.

 

For now, most of us are safe. But, as we've already seen, the NNES is finding it harder to teach ESL.

 

There are many countries in the world that no longer need the native language speaker to teach a language, as their own teachers are quite competent. While this is not yet true of China, within the next decade it could be.

 

Also, by being more nationalistic, they reduce the need for English, and thus, reduces demand for teachers. Especially true when China sets its own standards (CET anyone??)

5 years 48 weeks ago
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5 years 49 weeks ago
 
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You need VNP for scmp. Here's Reddit repost:

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/China/comments/58w604/scmp_locals_come_first_th...

 

Locals come first: the end of the golden era for expats in China?Rising living costs, new visa rules and a move towards hiring locals are making life on the mainland harder for foreigners, expats say

PUBLISHED : Saturday, 22 October, 2016, 11:54pm

UPDATED : Saturday, 22 October, 2016, 11:54pm

Julia Hollingsworth

http://twitter.com/juliaholli

When American Bob Furnow first came to China in the mid-2000s, he found a country open to outsiders. A decade on, he feels a growing and official resistance to expatriates.

“I think the sense now is the fewer foreigners in China, the better,” the management consultant and entrepreneur told the Post from his home in Beijing.

“I think there’s a sense that the country needs to be Chinese.” Furnow is not alone. According to an HSBC survey, China has been slipping down the rankings on attractiveness to expats, from third place out of 34 countries in 2014 to 34th place out of 45 this year. An InterNations survey found a similar trend, ranking China 38th out of 61 countries in 2014, and 48th out of 57 this year.

An HSBC spokesman said the trend was due to new entrants to the survey putting downward pressure on the league table, while InterNations founder Malte Zeeck said falls in China’s quality of life and family life index were behind it.

Another part of the picture could be the increasing cost of living, with Chinese cities getting more expensive over the past few years, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit’s worldwide cost of living reports editor Jon Copestake. Shanghai, for instance, ranked 102nd in the world for cost of living in 2011 – it is now at 11th place. Copestake put that down to wages and inflation staying relatively robust, and a stable yuan.

But some expats say there has been an increasingly negative response from the government to foreign workers. This follows a string of visa changes over the past few years and government posters earlier this year warning locals against falling in love with strangers from overseas.

Furnow, who is the managing director of RGI Limited, says the golden era of the expat is over, with reduced opportunities for expats in top-level positions as businesses look to cut costs in a tighter economic climate.

“I wish that China would be more open. I’m sensing a closing down somehow,” he said.

In the past, when China’s GDP was growing at faster rates – it was 14 per cent in 2007 – companies were prepared to put up with bureaucracy, pollution and the difficulties of doing business. But now that the period of “fast growth, easy money” is over, and GDP sank to 6.9 per cent growth last year, the overall sense from the business community is “why bother”, he said.

Marcel Austin-Martin, a New Zealander who has lived in China for nine years, said moves such as visa-tightening measures meant life was becoming increasingly difficult for foreigners, although long-time expats might be able to figure out ways around them.

The latest working-visa change, for example, came into force this month for foreigners in selected provinces, and will see expats given an A, B or C rating depending on work experience, language abilities and education.

“As a foreigner who has been here for a long time and is quite well-established, these changes tend to have much less impact,” he said. “By being well established here, one is accustomed to the Chinese ways and better able to be malleable and find a way around the changes, legal or otherwise.”

icnif77:

Word 'nong' is prohibited on Reddit .... so there's one handle 'MaoZeNong' 

"MaoZeNong 10 points 5 days ago 'Even Welsh people don't speak fuckin Welsh''

5 years 49 weeks ago
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Hotwater:

MaoZeNong should try visiting North Wales where about 75% of the residents still speak Welsh as a first language.......

5 years 49 weeks ago
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icnif77:

Did you look at Reddit about 'nong'? I c&p. It was from the 3rd or 4th  thread.

5 years 49 weeks ago
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5 years 49 weeks ago
 
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You mean locals who teach their students to say managerer?

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5 years 49 weeks ago
 
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“I think the sense now is the fewer foreigners in China, the better,” the management consultant and entrepreneur told the Post from his home in Beijing.

 

Darkness hates Light; the two cannot co-exist.  Having grown up the wolf bares its claws and is out to destroy.

 

“I think there’s a sense that the country needs to be Chinese.”

 

Keep dreaming. They completely erased all authentic Chinese religions, philosophies and culture with the so-called cultural revolution.

 

Even the authentic chinese written language was altered. Wherever the authentic Chinese written language is in daily use (predominantly the APAC region in places like Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia....etc) every Chinese calligrapher (including theirs) considers Mainland China's "simplified" chinese an eyesore.  Even a slightly artistic foreigner can tell the difference at a glance and say which is elegant and which is a monster.

 

How long did it take to build what two planes took a few minutes to utterly destroy on Sept.11, 2001?

 

Fake China wants to "install" thousands of years of culture back just like that? Keep dreaming.  

 

"According to an HSBC survey, China has been slipping down the rankings on attractiveness to expats, from third place out of 34 countries in 2014 to 34th place out of 45 this year."

We all know why;  people have eyes! 

DBushiri:

“I think there’s a sense that the country needs to be Chinese.”

I think the meaning behind this is not about the chinese culture, but rather about seeing less foreigners in china and keeping the jobs in the hand of natives.

5 years 49 weeks ago
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earthizen:

Localisation of jobs is nothing new, this goes all the way back to the early 2000s. MNCs replaces senior management positions to save costs without CCP asking. It simply is business. Large companies trim redundant staffs once in a while like gardeners prune their trees. Those being laid off find another job. So, monetarily there is little to gain in tightening visas offered to foreigners after more than 16 years of natural, self-driven business localisation. The market adjusts itself through supply and demand.

 

Xi's administration is about a strong china, this goes all the way back to 2008 Beijing Olympics when he succeeds Wu. The little girl sang "strong china" in the opening ceremony of Beijing Olympics in front of the world. It is Xi's broadcast both to the world and mainlanders.

 

If you look at internet and foreign textbook censorship you can see the theme, it is all about culture. Xi is fanning patriotism. Another look at what PRC is doing in the S. China Sea and you can see it even more clearly.

 

The wolf is asking for wars to prove its power. Jealousy and hatred for developed countries, generally speaking anyone who is better than them, has never left communist china. Communism is still being taught in schools. The only difference is when they still need western technology and money they put on their smiling facade. You see people's true color when they don't need your help any longer. PRC is asking for wars, be it trade wars, currency wars or cultural wars. Wars on all fronts. Capitalists want money. Communists want money and blood. This is the kind of thing weaklings do to prove their strengths, to settle old scores (i.e. vendetta).

5 years 49 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

"Localisation of jobs is nothing new, this goes all the way back to the early 2000s."

 

Bwahahahahahaaaa.......

 

"Early 2000's"???

 

Try a few thousand years ago, when migrating populations were travelling around. Or when one manufacturer/producer had enough money to afford a slave, where others couldn't!

5 years 48 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

"Communism is still being taught in schools."

 

That's communism with Chinese characteristics... they leave out the bits where the people at the top take far more than they merit, and leave others far more deserving to starve in bleak conditions.

 

They also ignore the 'State Owned Enterprise" actually means a lot of the money is siphoned off to pay for houses, cars, holidays, etc.

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This doesn't come as a surprise... why would it?

 

Xenophobic countries will always be xenophobic when brainwashed to be xenophobic... 

 

They only tolerated foreigners for the money and knowledge. 

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But who is "American Bob" Furnow? He could be a fool, a bastard, or a simpleton and how would we know because the article doesn't give us enough information to see if he is credible.

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I can understand top talented jobs are going away and the cost of living isn't matching the salaries people earn now. But ESL will always be here and always will be needed. I heard news like this in 2009, and here I am hearing it again. Remember in China the golden days end for the weekend and the golden days start again on Monday. Don't think too much about it.

Curiousdude:

well said!

5 years 49 weeks ago
Report Abuse

DBushiri:

Indeed the market demand is really unsatisfiable, but the worrying part is that the PRC doesn't give a shit about the market and makes it own rules.

They have their own agenda and I have no idea what their stances and plans are for the future, but sadly in the end the PRC has the last word, even if the markets are crying for more foreigners.

5 years 49 weeks ago
Report Abuse

ironman510:

For any sign of the end is when we actually start hearing groups or small hand fulls of teachers reporting to us or us witnessing them say: "I was told to leave, I'm a B class talent and I was replaced by a new type of A class talent." ( FYI, We're a long long way from that, I do believe A class and B class talents will be changed or modified a bit after a year or so.)

5 years 49 weeks ago
Report Abuse

Shining_brow:

Yes and no.

 

For now, most of us are safe. But, as we've already seen, the NNES is finding it harder to teach ESL.

 

There are many countries in the world that no longer need the native language speaker to teach a language, as their own teachers are quite competent. While this is not yet true of China, within the next decade it could be.

 

Also, by being more nationalistic, they reduce the need for English, and thus, reduces demand for teachers. Especially true when China sets its own standards (CET anyone??)

5 years 48 weeks ago
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5 years 49 weeks ago
 
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Like some YouTuber recently said, "get bent!", I am here making more money than most locals and most people in my country, I work for myself and myself only. I and only I will decide when it's the right time for me to leave and nothing the nationalist fools say or do will make me leave faster.

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5 years 49 weeks ago
 
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                   Teachers ESL Native  ---- no you worries  !!! 

 

 

 

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A: What is 'formal offer letter'? Only legally accepted employment o
A:What is 'formal offer letter'? Only legally accepted employment offer I know is a Contract! ... so, you just don't accept and sign the contract with the lower salary! Email exchanges, verbal discussions and other promises between you and employer aren't legally binding, so legal action isn't recommended. Mainly legal effective thingy is employer's stamped and signed contract! ... and after you ink it, employer can/will use your signed contract to apply for all necessary documents at Chinese governmental agencies as Working permit and all ... It would be better for you to not accept employment with such an employer, IMO 'cause you'll experience similar troubles by employer not respecting the contract later on. -- icnif77