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Q: HK,,, wow,,, I mean what do we say?

say anything?  I guess a lot of us here don't really feel comfortable saying anything at all,,,,,, I'll just say 'wow,,,,,  w o w....

 

https://www.foxnews.com/world/hong-kong-protests-smash-legislature-build...

 

20 weeks 2 days ago in  General  - China

 
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How do you explain to your kids that you sold their freedom, prosperity and opportunity for the future before they ever become adults? How do you tell someone that life will get worse with more control instead of better but it's for your own good. Pissed off does not even begin to explain the feeling.

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First day of G7 meeting ....

 

Hong Kong protesters throw bricks and petrol bombs at riot police

 

yesterday ...

Narration: HK people are standing up for liberty ... some British cops speaking Cantonese in riot gear helping HK police ...

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12 weeks 3 days ago
 
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I wonder if this whole thing will erupt?  Are we witnessing History being made?  Looks like a he** of a lot more than firing into the air.  Other pics show shooting a shotgun,,,  but I guess it was a 'bean-bag' round.

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 Does anybody know what 'PoPo' stand for? angel

You can see these words written as grafitti at demolished government building in HK on two of Zero's c&p ...

 

I was searching the web to find out what the entire graffiti means and ... 

 

It is a song by Corey Smith ... Have a look at the lyrics of song 'Fuck the PoPo':

 

 

COREY SMITH
Fuck The Po-po Lyrics

 

 
Blue lights flashin'
They got traffic stopped 
And highway 11's done turned into a permanent road block.
I wasn't drivin', my wife was my DD, she hadn't drank a 
drop,
still got hassled by the JPD.
And I said "Hey dude, can't you just leave her alone, she 
ain't done 
nothin' wrong, man, and we just wanna go home."
Whoa whoa.

(Chorus)
And I was mad as hell thinkin' f**k the popo. 
And they wonder why, folks don't trust 'em no more.
Whoa whoa.
And I'm not gonna let this go, and I'm sayin' f**k the popo.

So I got arrested,
Just for speakin' up and that cop said "Boy the only right you 
have is to 
shut the f**k up."
Now I'm a jailbird, I've done time in the pen.
And I've got a real messed up story to tell all my friends.
My name was in the newspaper in my hometown, 
They ruined my reputation because I wouldn't bow down.
Hell no. 

(Chorus)
And now I'm mad as hell,
Singin' f**k the popo.
And they wonder why folks don't trust 'em no more. 
Whoa whoa.
And I'm not gonna let this go,
And I'm sayin' f**k the popo. 

Two fingers in the air for the JPD, 
The long arm of the law comin' down on me. 
Now I understand why all those rappers are mad,
They must have been treated as badly as I have.
Now I'm screamin thug life, f**k the popo.
Shootin birds out the window whenever the cops go by,
They're puttin roadblocks in front of my house man,
I'm startin' to feel like I live under the Taliban.
Can't drive home without a gun in my face,
Thursday through Sunday they're invadin' my space,
Tellin' me its for my sake,
They're keepin' the streets safe,
By gettin the drunks off of the highway.
But I say man thats a big f**kin' lie.
It's all about the money from the dui's
Otherwise they'd be parked out in front of this bar,
Givin' free breathalizers before we get in our cars.
Instead they just hide about three miles away,
Sit and wait for one of us to make a mistake.
Drink a little too much you'll be cuffed and stuffed
And probably roughed up if you complain enough.
You'll be carted off to jail in the land of the free
Another victim of the overzealous JPD.
Now don't get me wrong I don't mean disrespect,
There's a lot of good cops who serve and protect.
They boldly put their lives on the line to protect our rights 
and give us 
peace of mind.
But for every cop who thinks his badge is a crown,
This song is for you and I'll never bow down.

And now I'm mad as hell singin' f**k the popo.
And they wonder why folks don't trust 'em no more. 
And I'm not gonna let this go,
So I'm singin' f**k the popo.

 

 

Man, HK kids are something else ... he he

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Leading Hong Kong democracy

 

activist Joshua Wong arrested

 

 

 

Leading Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has been arrested again, a day ahead of a banned protest rally in the city (AFP Photo/VIVEK PRAKASH)

Leading Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong was arrested Friday, his party said, a day ahead of a planned rally in the city that has been banned by police.

His arrest came just hours after the reported detention at Hong Kong's airport of a vocal independence campaigner, and as Beijing continues to pile pressure on the anti-establishment movement in the city.

"Our secretary-general @joshuawongcf was just arrested this morning at roughly 7:30," Demosisto tweeted. "He was forcefully pushed into a private minivan on the street in broad daylight. Our lawyers following the case now."

There was no immediate confirmation of Wong's arrest, and police did not respond to multiple calls.

More than 850 people have been arrested in connection with the recent protests since June, including prominent independence campaigner Andy Chan who was detained by police at Hong Kong airport on Thursday night.

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https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-activist-joshua-wong-004032534.html

 

Three Hong Kong Protest Leaders Arrested Before Weekend RalliesIain Marlow and Natalie Lung,•August 30, 2019  

Bgc(#444.8) Bgc(#444):h" data-reactid="29" href="https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-activist-joshua-wong-004032534.html">1 / 2Three Hong Kong Protest Leaders Arrested Before Weekend Rallies

(Bloomberg) -- Prominent Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong and other opposition figures have been arrested as the city’s authorities try to clamp down on historic pro-democracy demonstrations ahead of another planned wave of marches, rallies and strikes.

The 22-year-old Wong, who was scheduled to speak about the protests in the U.S. next month, was among well-known pro-democracy activists arrested by police on Thursday and Friday. The others included Wong’s fellow Occupy activist, Agnes Chow, independence advocate Andy Chan and Hong Kong District Councilor Rick Hui.

The arrests appeared to be part of a broader push back against the largely leaderless protest movement, which flared up in June over now-suspended legislation allowing extraditions before widening into a broader push for more democracy. Also Friday, the Civil Human Rights Front -- the organizer of the biggest recent demonstrations -- said it was forced to cancel a rally to mark the fifth anniversary of an election edict from Beijing that sparked the 2014 Occupy protests after police withheld approval.

The crisis in the former British colony threatens to distract from Chinese President Xi Jinping’s celebrations of 70 years of Communist Party rule on Oct. 1, which will highlight the country’s rebound from imperialism, war and inner turmoil. Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, Carrie Lam, earlier this week called for a dialogue with the opposition, while refusing to rule out invoking a sweeping colonial-era law easing arrests, deportations, censorship and property seizures.

The summer’s political unrest has been the worst since the city’s return to Chinese rule in 1997, with demonstrations that have resulted in often-violent clashes between protesters and police. Political observers said the moves ran the risk of drawing more people into the streets for unauthorized rallies, which can more easily get out of hand.

“Such actions are tantamount to inciting trouble at a time when the government is talking about dialogue and trying to lower the temperature,” said Kevin Yam, a political commentator and member of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy Progressive Lawyers Group. “You can’t on the one hand say, ‘Let’s lower the temperature, let’s talk, let’s make nice,’ and on the other hand do something like this.”

Separately, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. warned employees not to take part in a general strike planned for next week, after the airline’s chief executive, Rupert Hogg, stepped down to take responsibility for the uproar over airline staff’s participation in earlier actions. Two other organizers of recent protests, including CHRF leader Jimmy Sham and Max Chung, were attacked Thursday in the latest of several reported incidents of mob violence against activists.

891 Arrests, 2,071 Tear-Gas Canisters: Hong Kong’s Protests By the Numbers

“They’re trying to plant a seed of fear in people’s minds so that people will stop from attending protests, either the one tomorrow or ones in the future,” said Alvin Yeung, a pro-democracy lawmaker. “But my judgement is they won’t succeed, because Hong Kong people are very brave.”

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen -- who has helped resuscitate her re-election prospects by criticizing Beijing’s handling of the protests -- was among the first officials to express concern about the arrests. She called on authorities to comply with their promises of democracy, freedom and human rights to the city’s people, according to a statement from her office.

While the three arrested activists are among Hong Kong’s most prominent opposition voices --- Wong was the subject of a Netflix documentary titled “Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower” -- none has been seen as a central figure in the recent protests. The decentralized movement relies on social media apps and chat rooms to propose, vote on and revise protest plans on the fly.

Still, Wong has come under scrutiny for his meetings with U.S. officials, with China’s foreign ministry urging Americans to “draw a clear line with all anti-Chinese rioters, stop sending wrong signals to illegal violators, stop meddling in Hong Kong affairs.” Wong was planning to travel to the U.S. in September to speak out against what he described as authorities’ plans to establish “martial law” ahead of the National Day holiday.

The latest charges against Wong resulted from his role in a June 21 rally, in which he encouraged demonstrators to surround the police headquarters complex in Wan Chai, days after his release from jail on separate protest-related charges. His party Demosisto said Wong was on his way to a subway station when he “was suddenly pushed into a private car on the street,” adding that the group’s lawyers were working on the case.

Chan, the pro-independence founder of the banned Hong Kong National Party, said in a post on his personal Facebook page that he was stopped at the city’s airport departures area on Thursday night. Police said the Organized Crime and Triad Bureau arrested a 29-year-old man with the last name Chan at the airport for participating in riots and assaulting police, Radio Television Hong Kong reported, citing a police case with matching information.

Countdown to 2047: What Will Happen to Hong Kong?: QuickTake

Joseph Cheng, a local pro-democracy activist and retired political science professor, said Lam’s effort to contain the unrest could backfire if the arrests drew more people into the streets.

“There will be a lot of anger against these arrests,” Cheng said. “It’s generally believed that the Carrie Lam administration is sort of cleaning up the mess, so to speak, as instructed by Xi Jinping. And she would like to bring the situation under control by the Oct. 1 National Day.”

 

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Mass rally for tomorrow is called off , police arrested 7 pro-democracy activists in today's  AM hours, fines (up to 5-years jail time) as warning to anybody who would dare to participate in unlawful assembly on Saturday ... buTT ...

 

https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-police-round-activists-ahead-rally-0330...

 

After an appeal to hold the rally was rejected, Bonnie Leung of the avowedly peaceful CHRF said "no option but to cancel the march tomorrow".

But pockets of protesters swiftly vowed to hold creative events at the scheduled time and place of the rally, including a mass shopping trip, football match and impromptu religious gatherings in downtown Hong Kong, while a YouTuber with 800,000 followers called a fan meeting. 

With a hardcore minority among the protesters, mainly young students, unlikely to heed the police ban, the weekend appeared poised for renewed violent clashes.

 

 

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Bonus ... surprise

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-hongkong-protests-ban/hong-kong-prote...

    WORLD NEWSAUGUST 31, 2019 / 5:59 AM / UPDATED 42 MINUTES AGO

 

Hong Kong protests turn into chaos amid tear gas and petrol bombs

 

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong police fired tear gas and water cannon on Saturday as pro-democracy protesters threw petrol bombs in the latest in a series of clashes that have plunged the Chinese-ruled city into its worst political crisis in decades.

Police fired round after round of tear gas and protesters took cover behind umbrellas between the local headquarters of China’s People’s Liberation Army and the government. Protesters also threw bricks dug up from pathways at police.

The water cannon unleashed blue-dyed water, traditionally used elsewhere in the world to make it easier for police to identify protesters later.

Riot police then marched on foot toward the neighboring Admiralty district, followed by 20 police cars, where protesters had thrown fire bombs from flyovers, some landing close to police. Others shone blue and green lasers at police lines.

There were unconfirmed reports of an off-duty policeman being wounded.

In the Wanchai bar and restaurant district, police fought running battles with protesters, beating them with truncheons. There were several arrests.

The protests, which at one point blocked three key roads, came on the fifth anniversary of a decision by China to curtail democratic reforms and rule out universal suffrage in Hong Kong, a former British colony that was returned to China in 1997.

“The government today said rashly embarking on political reform again will further polarize society, which is an irresponsible act,” the government news.gov.hk website said.

 

“It noted any discussions on constitutional development have to be premised on the legal basis, and be conducted under a peaceful atmosphere with mutual trust in a pragmatic manner.”

The People’s Liberation Army on Thursday rotated its troops in Hong Kong in what it said was a routine operation. Their Hong Kong HQ was the former base of the British military garrison.

Thousands took to the streets of the Asian financial hub for a largely peaceful, meandering rally in the afternoon rain. Many of them joined a “Christian march” from Wanchai and congregating next to the Legislative Council, stormed by activists in an earlier protest.

Other protesters, many wearing black and face masks, marched in the Causeway Bay shopping district. The crowds grew after dusk in Wanchai, where demonstrators built roadblocks and banged iron sticks. Firemen battled a huge blaze outside a Methodist church in the main Hennessy Road where water cannon moved in.

There were also standoffs in North Point and Fortress Hill, to the east of Causeway Bay, and tear gas was fired against protesters over the harbor in Tsim Sha Tsui.

The protests have gone on for three months, sometimes turning violent, and have targeted the airport, the legislature and the Liaison Office, the symbol of Chinese rule.

“Hong Kong has religious freedom,” said Sally Yeung, 27, a Christian. “...If they prosecute us simply because we are praying, they infringe our religious freedom.”

Hovering under an umbrella outside the government offices, Eric, a 22-year-old student, said telling people not to protest was like telling them not to breathe. “I feel it’s my duty to fight for democracy. Maybe we win, maybe we lose. But we fight.”

Police erected water-filled plastic barriers around key government buildings, and two water cannon, used briefly for the first time last weekend, were at the ready near the Liaison Office, still daubed with graffiti from an earlier protest.

 “BE LIKE WATER”

Police arrested a number of prominent pro-democracy activists and three lawmakers on Friday, seeking to rein in a movement that began with anger over planned legislation allowing extraditions to mainland China, where courts are controlled by the ruling Communist Party. It soon broadened into calls for democracy amid fears China is squeezing Hong Kong’s freedoms.

But the latest protests have no leaders. The slogan is “be like water”, meaning be flexible. Marchers on Saturday were marching here and there, wherever streets took them, communicating with different hand signals and chanting “stand with Hong Kong” and “fight for freedom”.

China denies the charge of meddling in Hong Kong, which it says is an internal affair. It has denounced the protests and warned of the damage to the economy.

China is eager to quell the unrest before the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China on Oct. 1 but protesters vandalized a long red banner celebrating the event to cheers from the crowd.

Beijing has also accused foreign powers, particularly the United States and Britain, of fomenting the demonstrations and warned against foreign interference.

Hong Kong returned to China under a “one country, two systems” formula that allows it to keep freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland, like the freedom to protest and an independent legal system.

There have been frequent clashes between protesters and police, who have often fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds, amid accusations of excessive force.

“A lot of people from the outside think it is the police who escalate (the violence) first,” a police officer told a media briefing. “This is not true.”

An off-duty policeman was attacked late on Friday night by three unidentified men with a knife in the Kwai Chung container port area, suffering wounds to his limbs and back, police said. The news was a top-trending topic on China’s Twitter-like Weibo.

With protesters and authorities locked in an impasse and Hong Kong facing its first recession in a decade, speculation has grown that the city government may impose emergency laws, giving it extra powers over detentions, censorship and curfews.

 

Lawmaker Fernando Cheung said the arrests of the three legislators were probably aimed at causing more anger and chaos to justify the use of emergency laws.

“To incite more people to come out today is totally ridiculous,” he told Reuters.

 

 

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Get into u-Tube ... I know you can't see it in Chiner, but I can't go anymore with transcription what am watching ... all major news agencies (Canada, BBC, USA, France, Ozz ...) are reporting from HK on u-Tube.

... 300 000 Canadians, 100 000 Ozzies, 200 000 Brits, 250 000 Americans, 100 000 French live in HK ...

In short, HK government isn't independent anymore. Beijing runs the show ... but protesters are unstoppable ... 3 traffic accidents in Central can block the whole HK ... police force in HK is using decoys ... cops in regular clothes attacking protesters, triad members work hand-in-hand with police ... PLA must be among cops in HK already ...

'60 Minutes Australia': "Do you think you can win against the biggest commi country in the world?"

Joshua Wong, 22-years old: "We shall never surrender .... David vs. Goliath battle ...!"

Protesters: "Be like a water ..." ... That's Bruce Lee's quote ... I think.

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"Western sponsored protests in HK, here we go ...":

 

https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-students-plan-strike-035201855.html

 

Hong Kong students, workers strike as commutes disrupted

HONG KONG (AP) — High school students in Hong Kong added gas masks, goggles and hard hats to their formal white uniforms as they participated in a strike Monday on the first day of school to show their commitment to the city's fiery anti-government protest movement.

The nearly three months of youth-dominated protests — calling for democracy and an independent inquiry into police conduct — will be tested as classes resume after the summer break in the semiautonomous Chinese territory.

Strikers gathered in the hundreds at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and two public spaces in the city's central business district. Workers on strike congregated in Tamar Park, while at nearby Edinburgh Place, high school students who were skipping class rallied around a black banner that read, "With no future, there's no need to go to class."

At St. Francis' Canossian College, uniformed students kneeled in a line and held up hand-painted signs that read, "The five major demands: Not one is dispensable." The elite girls' school is where Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam was educated.

Hong Kong Education Secretary Kevin Yeung said he hoped students would stay in class.

"Schools should not be used as places for political demands or exercising pressure," he said at a government briefing.

The protesters' demands include dropping charges against demonstrators who have been arrested and formally withdrawing an extradition bill that would allow Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China to stand trial. The appeals are undergirded by a sense among some Hong Kong residents that the Communist Party-ruled mainland government has been eroding the autonomy and civil liberties promised when the former British colony was returned to China in 1997.

Some demonstrators disrupted the morning commute on Monday by blocking train doors, attempting to evade riot police who were hot on their heels by moving quickly between multiple public transit stations.

Officers at Lok Fu station hit protesters with batons and arrested one. Another three were arrested at Lai King station.

On Sunday, the MTR Corp. suspended train service to the airport after several hundred protesters gathered there following calls online to disrupt transportation. They blocked buses arriving at the airport but police in riot helmets kept them out of the terminal.

After protesters allegedly vandalized ticketing machines in Prince Edward station on Sunday, video footage showed police storming into the facility and beating up, pepper spraying and arresting passengers who police said were violent demonstrators.

Clashes between police and protesters have become increasingly violent, as the self-described "front-line" demonstrators use petrol bombs and throw rods at officers. Authorities in turn have employed water cannons, tear gas, rubber bullets and batons.

The protesters say that a degree of violence is necessary to get the government's attention after peaceful rallies were futile. Lam's administration, however, maintains that the violence must first end before any fruitful dialogue can begin.

"We always say that we must stop the violence right away, and then kick off the dialogue," said Administration Secretary Matthew Cheung Kin-Chung.

 
 "You Westerners are really bad ... " 

 

 

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Latest ...

 

Carrie Lam announces Hong Kong government will withdraw extradition bill

 

... watching report by 'The Guardian', 'Bloomberg', 'SCMP' over u-Tube ...

 

Lam's ''Address the Nation" calls for dialog-with-public in 5-points ... doesn't include 'independent inquiry into police violence during 13-weeks of unrest ...'

 

This came just in time for your '7-days-in-bed' Chinese October holidays ...

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OT: WATCH WHAT YOU ARE POSTING ONLINE!

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-09-05/now-its-official-us-visas-can-...

Now It's Official: US Visas Can Be Denied If You (Or Even Your Friends) Are Critical Of American Policies

 

 

There have been several interesting developments in the United States government’s war on free speech and privacy.

First of all, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Customs and Border Protection Agency (CBP), which is responsible for actual entry of travelers into the country, has now declared that it can legally access phones and computers at ports of entry to determine if there is any subversive content which might impact on national security. “Subversive content” is, of course, subjective, but those seeking entry can be turned back based on how a border control agent perceives what he is perusing on electronic media.

  

Unfortunately, the intrusive nature of the procedure is completely legal, particularly as it applies to foreign visitors, and is not likely to be overturned in court in spite of the Fourth Amendment’s constitutional guarantee that individuals should “…be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.” Someone at a port of entry is not legally inside the United States until he or she has been officially admitted. And if that someone is a foreigner, he or she has no right by virtue of citizenship even to enter the country until entry has been permitted by an authorized US Customs and Border Protection official. And that official can demand to see anything that might contribute to the decision whether or not to let the person enter.

And there’s more to it than just that. Following the Israeli model for blocking entry of anyone who can even be broadly construed as supporting a boycott, the United States now also believes it should deny admittance to anyone who is critical of US government policy, which is a reversal of previous policy that considered political opinions to be off-limits for visa denial. DHS, acting in response to pressure from the White House, now believes it can adequately determine hostile intent from the totality of what appears on one’s phone or laptop, even if the material in question was clearly not put on the device by the owner. In other words, if a traveler has an email sent to him or her by someone else that complains about behavior by the United States government, he or she is responsible for that content.

One interesting aspect of the new policy is that it undercuts the traditional authority of US Embassies and Consulates overseas to issue visas to foreigners. The State Department visa process is rigorous and can include employment and real property verification, criminal record checks, social media reviews and Google-type searches. If there is any doubt about the visa applicant, entry into the US is denied. With the new DHS measures in place, this thoroughly vetted system is now sometimes being overruled by a subjective judgment made by someone who is not necessarily familiar with the traveler’s country or even regarding the threat level that being a citizen of that country actually represents.

Given the new rules regarding entering the United States, it comes as no surprise that the story of an incoming Harvard freshman who was denied entry into the United States after his laptop and cellphone were searched at Boston’s Logan Airport has been making headlines. Ismail Ajjawi, a 17-year-old Palestinian resident of Lebanon, was due to begin classes as a freshman, but he had his student visa issued in by the US Embassy in Beirut rejected before being flown back to Lebanon several hours later.

Ajjawi was questioned by one immigration officer who asked him repeatedly about his religion before requiring him to turn over his laptop and cell phone. Some hours later, the questioning continued about Ajjawi’s friends and associates, particularly those on social media. At no point was Ajjawi accused of having himself written anything that was critical of the United States and the interrogation rather centered on the views expressed by his friends.

The decision to ban Ajjawi produced such an uproar worldwide that it was reversed a week later, apparently as a result of extreme pressure exerted by Harvard University. Nevertheless, the decisions to deny entry are often arbitrary or even based on bad information, but the traveler normally has no practical recourse to reverse the process. And the number of such searches is going up dramatically, numbering more than 30,000 in 2017, some of which have been directed against US residents. Even though permanent resident green card holders and citizens have a legal right to enter the United States, there are reports that they too are having their electronic media searched. That activity is the subject of an American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security that is currently working its way through the courts. The ACLU is representing 10 American citizens and a legal permanent resident who had their media searched without a warrant as required by the Fourth Amendment.

It is believed that many of the arbitrary “enforcements” by the CBP are carried out by the little-known Tactical Response Team (TRT) that targets certain travelers that fit a profile. DHS officials confirmed in September 2017 that 1,400 visa holders had been denied entry due to TRT follow-up inspections. And there are also reports of harassment of American citizens by possible TRT officials.

A friend of mine was returning from Portugal to a New York Area airport when he was literally pulled from the queue as he was departing the plane. A Customs agent at the jetway was repeatedly calling out his birth date and then also added his name. He was removed from the line and taken to an interrogation room where he was asked to identify himself and then queried regarding his pilot’s license. He was then allowed to proceed with no other questions, suggesting that it was all harassment of a citizen base on profiling pure and simple.

My friend is a native-born American who has a Master’s degree and an MBA, is an army veteran and has no criminal record, not even a parking ticket. He worked for an American bank in the Middle East more than thirty years ago, which, together with the pilot’s license, might be the issue these days with a completely paranoid federal government constantly on the lookout for more prey “to keep us safe.” Unfortunately, keeping us safe has also meant that freedom of speech and association as well as respect for individual privacy have all been sacrificed. As America’s Founding Father Benjamin Franklin once reportedly observed, “Those who would give up essential Liberty to purchase a little temporary Safety will wind up with neither.”

 

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u-Tube:

Hong Kong protesters, riot police standoff outside Mong Kok station by Global News Streamed 3 hours ago 1 hour, 10 minutes 29,808 views

Hong Kong riot police and protesters clashed outside Mong Kok station as demonstrators demanded CCTV footage of alleged police brutality,

Police shot rubber bullets and fired tear gas to disperse the protesters into Prince Edward MTR station as demonstrators burned paper money creating a giant bonfire.

 

1. Carrie Lam must resign! ----> protesters aren't buying Lam abolished extradition bill independently ... he he;

2. Independent inquiry into police brutality during 13-weeks of protests ... ----> 'Fuck the PoPo';

3. More than 1000 arrested protesters must be released ...;

4. Maria Bartiromo's interview with Jimmy Lai on Hong Kong protests: The resistance will go on ...

Talk is about facial recognition software in place all around China ...

Protests won't stop because only one protesters demand was fulfilled ... 14th week ...

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I wouldn't advise anyone travel through the US of A, nor Hong Kong. HK is obvious right now. But the US seems to have become a little more paranoid lately. sad It will be only a matter of time before the west adopts the systems used in the east to track it's people

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https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/politics/article/3029855/teenage-boy...

 

Teenage boy and girl, both 13, among youngest arrested on Saturday night amid Hong Kong protests

-The boy was detained in Tseung Kwan O after officers found a laser pen and can of spray paint on him

-The girl was arrested over the burning of the Chinese flag in Tuen Mun

Published: 4:02pm, 22 Sep, 2019

A teenage boy and girl, both 13, were among the youngest people arrested 16th straight weekend of anti-government protests rocking Hong Kong.

The boy, identified by his surname Kong, was arrested in Tseung Kwan O for “possession of offensive weapons” after police found a laser pen and a can of spray paint on him, the force revealed on Sunday.

Separately, the girl was arrested in Tuen Mun for burning the Chinese flag.

“It is hard to understand how the laser pens and spray paints are weapons, unless the police can see or have evidence of the boy using it to attack someone,” said Billy Li on-yin, the convenor of the Progressive Lawyers Group. “There is no sufficient indication to regard laser pens and spray paint as offensive weapons.”

Li said there were three possibilities where an object could be considered a weapon, including if something is a weapon by nature, such as a gun, or if something has been adapted into a weapon, such as a toothbrush with a sharpened handle. The third situation is where someone is found using an object to attack or attempt to attack another person, or if someone said they would use the object as a weapon.

He said the arrests of minors and adults was worrying not because of age, but rather because they appeared to be arbitrary.

“Minors are less informed about their rights when they are under arrests however, which makes the situation more concerning,” Li said.

Kong was arrested with another male suspect, 19, surnamed Chan. The latter was held over illegal assembly, police said. Officers were responding to a call about a fight on Tong Yin Street, Tseung Kwan O at about 11pm on Saturday, where some protesters had gathered. The two suspects had reportedly pointed lasers at police.

After the pair were taken away, residents surrounded the local police station, and officers later fired at least two rounds of sponge grenades, as well as pepper sprayed the crowd, according to media reports.

The crowd eventually left at about 2am on Sunday.

Police have yet to announce total arrest figures for Saturday’s unrest, which started with an authorised march in Tuen Mun that descended into chaos, where police fired tear gas as protesters blocked roads and set fire to barricades.

In Yuen Long, a sit-in occurred at the MTR station to mark two months since a mob in white with wooden sticks and metal rods attacked protesters and commuters.

Earlier on Saturday, calls by pro-Beijing protesters to remove protest posters and notes from “Lennon Walls” across the city drew lower-than-expected turnouts.

Since June 9, more than 30 young people, aged between 12 and 15 have been arrested by police for taking part in protests against the now-withdrawn extradition bill. Police have said they follow appropriate protocol when handling cases involving children or teens, but social workers have criticised the use of the Juvenile Court to punish protesters.

On August 31, three suspects aged between 13 and 15 were removed from their parents’ custody after police obtained a care and protection order from the Juvenile Court. The 15-year-old boy was eventually released and placed on curfew until his next court appearance on September 27.

Separately, the Good Neighbour North District Church said on its Facebook page that a man, 73, known as “Uncle Chan”, who had gone on a hunger strike as part of the protests, was not arrested on Saturday.

Speaking to reporters at Lai King MTR station on Sunday, he said: “I was just trying to negotiate with police and they suddenly pepper sprayed me. Police have been trying to dig up evidence on me to arrest me, but they can’t find any.”

The elderly volunteer with the “Protect the Children” group is often spotted trying to convince police not to arrest protesters. He was on Saturday seen being pepper sprayed by police and taken to a back alley in Tuen Mun, leading to fears he was arrested.

The church said Chan was doing well after receiving treatment for his injuries. However, another volunteer with the group was arrested and would meet a lawyer.

 

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How do you say " Happy October holidays ..." in Mandarin?

 

https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/politics/article/3030862/police-batt...

 

 

Police battle protesters as they set streets ablaze in central Hong Kong

  • Plain-clothes officer fires live-round warning shot skywards to drive away demonstrators, while water cannon, tear gas and rubber bullets are also used
  • Petrol bombs thrown and fires lit as chaos and violence engulf Admiralty, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay, with MTR stations again targeted
  • SCMP Reporters  

     

     

    Published: 12:21am, 30 Sep, 2019

    Rioting protesters set many parts of Hong Kong’s bustling commercial streets ablaze on Sunday as the city saw a 17th straight weekend of unrest.

    Chaos and violence engulfed Admiralty, Wan Chai and Causeway Bay, with riot police battling mobs of protesters for hours. Amid the mayhem, a plain-clothes officer fired a live-round warning shot skywards to drive away protesters who were near him and his colleagues.

    More than 100 people were arrested, and as of 10.30pm, 25 had been taken to hospital with injuries.

    Sunday’s protests were noticeably more violent than the day before, an ominous sign ahead of National Day on Tuesday, when China will mark the 70th anniversary of Communist Party rule.

     

    Protesters have called for a general strike on Monday and vowed to go out in full force on Tuesday to spoil Beijing’s celebration. Sparked by a 

    now-abandoned extradition bill

    , the protest movement has broadened, and the central government is a clear target.

     

    The day began with thousands of protesters, in defiance of a police ban, gathering in Causeway Bay to march to the government headquarters in Admiralty. Police warned them it was an illegal assembly and they were obstructing traffic, and just before 2.30pm they fired the first round of tear gas at the crowd.

    Many people ran into nearby shops for shelter but quickly regrouped, and the outnumbered riot police eventually pulled back while the protesters pressed on to Admiralty. A National Day billboard was removed from the Pacific Place footbridge and burned in the middle of the road.

     

    Emotions ran high as they reached the barricaded government headquarters, with some throwing bricks and petrol bombs into it. Police used water cannon to disperse them, and fired tear gas and rubber bullets. 

    A 39-year-old Indonesian journalist working for Suara Hong Kong News was said to have been hit in the right eye by a beanbag round and was in a serious condition in hospital.

     

    Some protesters headed for Wan Chai, venting their anger on the city’s railway operator the MTR Corporation. The company, whose majority shareholder is the government, has frequently been targeted by protesters who say it has colluded with the police. The MTR closed several stations in anticipation of trouble, including Wan Chai.

    A mob of protesters smashed the windows at an entrance to the Wan Chai station, throwing at least two petrol bombs inside, and other objects. Unable to force open the shuttered gate, they eventually set the whole entrance on fire, creating a thick plume of black smoke.

     

    Soon, fire broke out in many other places, from Admiralty to Causeway Bay. Some protesters tried to torch another MTR entrance in Causeway Bay and burned garbage in the middle of the road near the Methodist Church in Wan Chai.

    A block away, a huge bonfire was lit on the junction of Fleming Road and Lockhart Road, with riot police watching from the other side. The protesters tried to throw petrol bombs at them but most landed instead in the middle of the road. A shuttered shop around the corner briefly caught on fire.

    Police also stepped up their use of force. Tear gas was fired at far more frequent intervals than the day before, which marked the fifth anniversary of the largely peaceful Occupy protests in 2014. They also pepper-sprayed many protesters at close range, including lawmaker Eddie Chu Hoi-dick, who was not wearing a mask.

    The Special Tactical Squad, also known as Raptors, chased protesters up and down the streets, wrestling them to the ground to make arrests. Just outside Pacific Place on Harcourt Road, police took away at least 37 suspects, and they also rounded up a few dozen on Queensway. The operation continued well into the night.

    Police confirmed the firing of a live round in a statement issued early on Monday morning that “strongly condemned” protesters for their violent acts.

    The force said that at about 5.30pm, some officers were surrounded and attacked by a large group of violent protesters while executing their duties near Wan Chai MTR station, “With their lives under serious threat, an officer fired one warning shot into the sky to protect their own safety,” the statement said.

    In the evening, scuffles broke out between protesters and people who argued with them. In Causeway Bay, a man in black was kicked and punched by a group of protesters and his shirt was torn. He was knocked to the pavement and suffered head wounds and was eventually escorted away by a Caucasian. The protesters accused him of being a “gangster” from Fujian.

    In another incident, a man dressed in white was taken to hospital after he was beaten on the ground by a gang of protesters, who went on to stamp on him.

    Also in Causeway Bay, a crowd surrounded a taxi, accusing the driver of speeding, saying he almost hit one of them. Police arrived and escorted the driver away but the crowd then smashed the taxi’s windows, vandalised its interior and even destroyed the engine.

    Many shops and restaurants with owners considered to be pro-Beijing were also defaced and vandalised.

    After another weekend of chaos, attention will now turn to Tuesday, when Beijing celebrates the founding of the People’s Republic of China.On Sunday, President Xi Jinping presented honorary medals to 42 Chinese and foreigners, including former Hong Kong chief executive Tung Chee-hwa, for their contributions to the country. It was the first time the awards were given out, and Tung was the first person from Hong Kong to receive one – for his outstanding contribution to the “one country, two systems” principle that allowed the city to retain its unique way of life after returning to Chinese rule.But as Hong Kong’s biggest political crisis continues, its future is far from certain.This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: violence, and chaos and a warning shotViolence, chaos and a warning shot as protests go on

     

     

     

     

 

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Next weekend i recon it will be on for toung and old..
300000 people in one place and no after party to go to.
And this will also put Taiwan on notice .
Shit going to hit the fan very soon

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The Genie is out of the bottle now....there is only one way this can go and it is not the way of the protesters.
This will end up in total un forgiving crack down...all hand over arrangements will go out the window ..
This is the end of HK as a stand alone icon...just another Chinese Blackwater in the very near future.
Some countries can expect a rush on asylum applications from people that will be persecuted by Chima if they stay or return to HK.
Sad days ahead

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Yeah,,,  mask ban not working out too well.  devil  kinda a dumb move in a place where so many wear them all the time, way b4 all this sh*t started...

 

looks like another shooting...

 

One man shot (2:45 a.m.)

A plain-clothed policeman fired a shot which injured a man at about 9 p.m. on Friday after the officer was attacked and beaten by protesters, Yolanda Yu, a police senior superintendent, said a press conference early Saturday morning. The incident is being investigated, she said, defending the right of the officer to discharge his weapon as his life “was threatened.”

The police haven’t been in contact with the man, who’s undergoing surgery at a local hospital. While she didn’t link the case to the earlier injury sustained by a 14-year-old, Yu said she believes it’s related to the open-fire incident in the Yuen Long district.

Injured 14-year-old, officer assaulted: (12:18 a.m.)

A 14-year-old who was sent to hospital is in a serious condition after this evening’s protests, according to a spokesman for Hong Kong’s Hospital Authority. The spokesman couldn’t specify how the patient was injured.

 

 

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Hong Kong Protesters Build Makeshift Catapult On Third Day Of Unrest Over 'Anti-Mask' Law

Lam's bill, which she hoped would discourage the protests, is having the opposite effect.

  •  
  • OCT 6, 2019 12:00 PM

After protesters on Saturday destroyed dozens of ATMs during a rampage across the city, the Hong Kong Association of Banks warned on Sunday that cash refills to certain banks and ATMs would likely be delayed a while longer.

Even as protests died down elsewhere in the city, a hard-core group of radicals in Mong Kok threw Molotov cocktails and police barricades and caused general mayhem.

In what can only be described as a creative triumph for the protesters (and one of the most impressive accomplishments since the demonstrations began), a handful of mask-clad demonstrators used bamboo scaffolding and countless zip-ties to build a makeshift catapult to keep the police at bay.

The catapult was situated on Nathan Road, outside the HSBC building In Mong Kok.

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Protesters smashed windows and set train leaving for mainland on fire ... so ...

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/first-public-warning-hk-leader-sa...

 

Chinese Army Ready To Step In Against Rioters - HK's Carrie Lam Warns For First Time

Tue, 10/08/2019 - 10:25

Given there's no sign the ferocity of the unrest will stall or lessen, and given Carrie Lam's first formal warning of the mainland's People's Liberation Army intervention, it appears Hong Kong authorities are prepping for a worst case scenario, which Beijing will only be too happy to oblige. 

 

... with pics and vids on weblink ... more text, too ...

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Is Martial Arts popular sport in HK ...?

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/watch-hong-kong-cop-taken-out-fly...

 

Watch: Hong Kong Cop Taken Out By Flying Drop-Kick To Stop Arrest

 Video of the fly-kick ... on the weblink ... anti-riot cop in knock-down ...

 

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Over 4 months and still going strong

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Caught On Video: Hong Kong Protester Shot By Police During Morning Clashes; Hang Seng Tumbles

20' vid of altercation on the weblink ... with warning:

"A longer clip of the shooting is below. Reader discretion advised."

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/health/caught-video-hong-kong-protester-shot-p...

 

Police issued a statement saying that radical protesters had set up barricades at multiple locations across the city and warned the demonstrators to "stop their illegal acts immediately." They did not comment immediately on the apparent shooting.

Services on some train and subway lines were alsodisrupted early on Monday, with riot police deployed near stations and shopping malls. Many universities cancelled classes on Monday and there were long traffic jams in some areas.

Monday's violence followed a 24th straight weekend of anti-government unrest as activists blocked roads and trashed shopping malls across Hong Kong’s New Territories and Kowloon peninsula.

 

Today's chaos follows the death last Friday of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology student Chow Tsz-lok, days after he fell in a car park near a police dispersal operation where tear gas had been fired.

Protesters are angry about what they see as police brutality and meddling by Beijing in the former British colony’s freedoms, guaranteed by the “one country, two systems” formula put in place when the territory returned to Chinese rule in 1997. Meanwhile, China has repeatedly warned that continued violence could be met with a ground invasion of Hong Kong, although so far Beijing has demonstrated an unwillingness to escalate.

The Hang Seng stock index tumbled more than 2% in early trading following news of the shooting.

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Yeah, it's getting pretty intense there now. Don't see any way it can end well.

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Civilian force to be reconed with ... 

 

"I'll Die For Hong Kong": Students Transform Campuses Into Armories As Protests Rage For 4th Straight Day

  •  

"We would probably throw petrol bombs and bricks because we don’t want our friends to be injured..."

 

 

icnif77:

 "Where's everybody ...? I am ready ...c'mon!"  

In one video circulating on Twitter, students at CUHK have established check points around the campus's perimeter to stop any undercover cops from entering.

6 days 5 hours ago
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diverdude1:

haha,,, 'l'obean hrood' is lookin' serious!  check out that quiver!   that'll be the news story soon enuf,,, some Fuzz gets done by an arrow!  haha

*Life is Hard, and then You Die.

6 days 5 hours ago
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icnif77:

Look how many spears he's got in the bag ... LOL

As Reuters described it, "hundreds of young people dressed in black set about turning several of Hong Kong’s top universities into fortresses, well stocked with improvised weapons."

At City University of Hong Kong, Reuters said protesters were using ping pong tables, potted plants, furniture, sports equipment, and bamboo to build a network of barricades to block roads and fortify the entrances to the student residence complex. Some took garden hoses and hammered nails into them to create rope-like lines that would rip up car tires. Meanwhile, hundreds of protesters wearing gas masks and helmets accumulated piles of paving bricks and ceramic tiles to hurl at police, while others stockpiled dozens of petrol bombs to distribute to their forward positions.

With protesters wielding increasingly deadly weapons - and the HK police resorting to increasingly harmful tactics (they've shot at least three protesters as of Thursday evening, local time) - the situation in Hong Kong is threatening to spiral into a whole new level of violence.

One anonymous demonstrator told Reuters that the protests are just trying to even the odds between them and the police, who carry guns.

"It has never been a fair war zone," said 23-year-old Josh, as he watched protesters practice shooting arrows at Baptist University (BU).

"We have nothing, only masks and the police have guns. We’re only trying to defend ourselves." 

Another young student protester insisted that they tried the non-violent approach, but the police escalated.

"We try every peaceful means but we fail," said Chris, 19, a student from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

"We would probably throw petrol bombs and bricks because we don’t want our friends to be injured," he said, breaking into tears as he described police crackdowns.

"I’m willing to die for Hong Kong."

Of course, incidents of violence by both sides have been increasing.

Down in the central business district, protesters had gathered to paralyze the city's economy for the fourth straight day. Even more companies have asked employees to stay home, and according to Bloomberg, JP Morgan has cancelled its planned Global Technology, Media & Telecom Conference that had been set for Nov. 18 and 19 in Hong Kong. Schools remain closed, and the city remains largely immobilized by the violence.

In another disconcerting development, the Global Times, a Communist Party-controlled tabloid, tweeted Thursday that Hong Kong's government would impose a curfew over the weekend. The tweet was up for roughly 40 mins before it was deleted, with the paper's editor later claiming that it was a premature editorial misfire.

But was it a trial balloon? A warning? or truly just an editorial snafu?

Is Beijing finally setting the stage for the PLA to arrive and forcibly restore order?

     

    6 days 3 hours ago
    Report Abuse

    icnif77:

    I am watching over u-Tube ... riot at Chinese University ... man these kids are acting as pros ... one is rolling big plywood folding round table which serves as a shield to 10 others, all dressed in black with umbrellas, fires burning all around and gas projectiles falling out of the sky... These kids don't give a flying fuk ... Even the last link I pasted from Zero is full of pics ... roads full of stones and other items ... where do they get all this?

    Man, I often think about the days I spent in HK on visa runs. These kids never gave an impressions as I can see it and read about now ... more of impression of politeness, kindness ... and now this.

    Next time I'll stop in HK, I'll just bow to these kids.

    That thingy on u-Tube already has 200 000 views. Not too shabby ...

    5 days 22 hours ago
    Report Abuse

    icnif77:

    Who'da thunk it?

     

    Live | Officer shot with arrow, police deploy water cannons as university clash escalates

    ... we need new thread. This one is too long ...

    3 days 11 hours ago
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    A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
    A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs