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Q: HK,,, wow,,, I mean what do we say?

say anything?  I guess a lot of us here don't really feel comfortable saying anything at all,,,,,, I'll just say 'wow,,,,,  w o w....

 

https://www.foxnews.com/world/hong-kong-protests-smash-legislature-build...

 

11 weeks 6 days ago in  General  - China

 
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How do you explain to your kids that you sold their freedom, prosperity and opportunity for the future before they ever become adults? How do you tell someone that life will get worse with more control instead of better but it's for your own good. Pissed off does not even begin to explain the feeling.

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11 weeks 6 days ago
 
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How do you explain to your kids that you sold their freedom, prosperity and opportunity for the future before they ever become adults? How do you tell someone that life will get worse with more control instead of better but it's for your own good. Pissed off does not even begin to explain the feeling.

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11 weeks 6 days ago
 
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Wow, that's an escalation.

 

I bet there's some scary sh*t going on behind the scenes now... wonder if stories about unexplained 'suicides and accidents' involving the ringleaders and reports of 'foreign organisers' will start coming out soon.

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11 weeks 6 days ago
 
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Kids in HK don't give a flying fuk ...! They are very hearty ...

 

They were demanding protection at UN session in Osaka, however 'mother' opposed as 'that is China's internal matter (same as Xinjiang)'.

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11 weeks 5 days ago
 
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Aaaaaand, it's Western countries to blame.

 

I'm curious to know if anyone reading that in China actually believes a foreign country can convince 'happy, content people' to come out in their millions - risking tear gas, police batons and who knows what else - to protest something they agree with.

 

 

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-hongkong-extradition-china/chinese-st...

 

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11 weeks 3 days ago
 
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This was escalation and throwdown. July 1, party day for the mainland, anniversary of the hong kong agreement, and also canada day for the canucks. This was in your face world humilation like gorbochov having to use the back door instead of the red carpet in june 89, hope it does not end like the last time China lost face to the world.

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11 weeks 3 days ago
 
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https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-05/core-hong-kong-protesters-prep...

 

Core Hong Kong Protesters 'Prepared To Die For Their Cause' During Riots

Fri, 07/05/2019 - 09:12

A core group of radical protesters who led the violent siege of Hong Kong's legislature on Monday were willing to die for their cause as martyrs, according to SCMP

Approximately ten 'diehards' with a 'bring it on' attitude had no qualms about facing police batons, rubber bullets or worse, as they broke into and trashed the Legislative Council building. 

"The protesters at the front were willing to sacrifice themselves. They turned so violent, hoping police would use aggressive force against them or shoot them with rubber bullets or beanbag rounds," said SCMP's source, adding "If the individuals were badly injured or even killed, all the blame would have been placed on police so as to spark global condemnation, and eventually bring the whole administration down." 

 

 

Hong Kong leadership expects the radical group to organize future protests in order to spark future clashes with the police that may lead to their desired outcome. 

 

Hong Kong police made their first arrest on Wednesday after searching for those who used makeshift battering rams to smash the glass in front of the legislature - many of whom were wearing masks to avoid identification.

At 1pm, the protesters led by the 'kamikaze' core of radicals began using a metal cart and iron bars to break the building's glass as riot police stood by. After they finally broke in around 9pm, the protesters ransacked the building, spraying graffiti on the walls and tearing down political leaders' portraits.

A new protest is planned for Sunday according to the Straits Times.

... more ...

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11 weeks 2 days ago
 
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I bet the drug dealers are having a field day with crowds like that.

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11 weeks 1 day ago
 
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Ah, and it brings out who people are. Back in Scandinavia a local debate group for Chinese people blew up over this. The majority of course thinks "Hongkongers are doing a dangerous thing".... standard Childish retoric used to clearly mark support for the motherland, but no real argumentaion as to why. 

 

Simple questions like "then why does people cross the border every day to buy safe products in Hong Kong" ? gets random answers. People are blind to the fight the people of Hong Kong are fighting. 

 

But the very real fight against extradition of course should be supported by anyone who ever plans to spend time in HK, as, if passed, will no longer be a safe place for anyone, who has ever in a public forum, utters his/hers opinion about the great leaders penis size. 

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11 weeks 1 day ago
 
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Re education camps in HK by the end of the year

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8 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Relentless HK-ers ...

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-26/theres-no-end-sight-hong-kong-...

 

"There's No End In Sight": Hong Kong Protests Spark Comparisons To France's Yellow Vest Movement

 

Similarities are starting to be drawn between Hong Kong's mass rallies and France's Yellow Vest movement: according to Bloomberg, both are "hard to pin down" and both are evolving. It's a "recipe for trouble" for each country's respective government. 

The Hong Kong protests that started against legislation that would enable extradition back to the mainland have now grown to include cries for Lam's resignation and investigations into police abuse during the protests themselves. 

One anonymous 28 year protester in Hong Kong said: 

“We have to continue to protest until our demands are met. There is no end in sight.”

 

 

... more ...

 

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8 weeks 1 day ago
 
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... and-dd-o ... warning from Admin. (I  could say ... ):

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-07-29/beijing-warns-more-unrest-hong...

 

Beijing Warns More Unrest In Hong Kong "Won't Be Tolerated"

In what appears to be a first since Hong Kong was handed back to China by the UK in 1997, the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office, a mainland authority that oversees the two Chinese territories, held a press conference on Monday where they reiterated that the violent protests that continued through Sunday wouldn't be tolerated by Beijing's government, BBG reports.

 

The HKMAO, which answers directly to China's cabinet, reaffirmed its support for the city's government and police during what was a rare press briefing on Monday. After the briefing, the heads of the authority brusquely left the room, ignoring questions shouted by journalists.

 

"No civilized society under the rule of law would ever allow acts of violence to take place."

 

According to the SCMP, Yang said the CPC has three 'hopes' for Hong Kong: That segments of the population start opposing violence, that various sectors firmly protect the rule of law, and that society can "get out of political conflict as soon as possible." 

 

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7 weeks 6 days ago
 
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What do they say? ... yesterday:

 

 

"The more the government suppresses us, the more we will come out until the government responds to our demands," protester Ah Kit, 36, told AFP."

 

Two marches are also planned for Sunday - one on Hong Kong island and the other in the Tseung Kwan O district - as well as a city-wide strike on Monday and rallies in seven locations.

 

https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-protesters-block-tunnel-112602260.html

 

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7 weeks 19 hours ago
 
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and some people we know like to blame the Am...devil for Imperialism and hegemoney. Beijing is learning a lot about world domination. Stay tuned for more world wide dramasad from the "Near Arctic" nation.indecision

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7 weeks 5 hours ago
 
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Beijing wont put up with this much longer ....thats a heavy dutie bridge that connects hk to the mainland

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7 weeks 51 min ago
 
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https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-claims-u-s-black-hand-is-behind-hong-kong-protests-11565356245

 

If all else fails, blame the west, that always works. Since the British faked a chemical attack on Assad to draw the US into a War, I bet any backing is coming from the British delegation, Trump certainly does not care but if they screw with Taiwan, Trump will bring hell down on the whole region.

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6 weeks 1 day ago
 
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  •  

Hong Kong Police Fire Tear Gas On Protesters In 10th Week Of Demonstrations

 

"Flash mob-style protesters broke off from an earlier approved demonstration..." 

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  • Aug 11, 2019 11:35 AM

 

'Flash-mob'? That's 'hit&run' I think ...

 

Hong Kong has fallen into violence amid the 10th straight week of protests, as police fire tear gas on thousands of demonstrators donning yellow helmets and black clothing.

In Causeway Bay, an approved rally at Victoria Park earlier morphed into an illegal march, with anti-government protesters engaging in a stand-off with police in Wan Chai, while in Sham Shui Po, clashes at a police station result in the first tear gas rounds of the day. Meanwhile, in North Point, tensions run high with the local community bracing for confrontations with protesters, while at the airport a third day of a sit-in is under way.

Locations where rounds of tear gas have rained down on protesters are: Sham Shui Po, Wan Chai, Tsim Sha Tsui and within Kwai Fong MTR station in Kwai Chung. -SCMP

The protests were sparked by outrage over a controversial extradition bill which would have allowed suspects to be transferred to mainland China to face trial. In response, the government shelved the bill - however much like France's Yellow Vest movement, Hong Kong's demonstrators have expanded their cause into a general anti-government protest despite Beijing's dire warnings that a nearby military contingent will use deadlier measures to control the situation.

Protesters flooded various Mass Transit Railway (MTR) stations on Sunday, some of whom were met with tear gas.

Meanwhile, activist Ventus Lau Wing-hong, who organized two anti-government rallies last month, had his home vandalized and received what he says was a death threat.

Three days of demonstrations at the Hong Kong International Airport are winding down, as protesters gathered in the halls on Friday to try and explain what's going on to foreigners - passing out handmade postcards and stickers.

Crowd in the airport’s chanting “stand with Hong Kong/fight for freedom” Credit: SCMP staff

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6 weeks 9 hours ago
 
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wow,,, at first I thought it would just be a few kids acting cool,,,  but look at this!  we are talking Russia early1900's!  These folks look serious.  as most of us here know it ain't exactly easy to get out to HK International....  These folks are seriously motivated to keep the Han out of their buisness.

 

Canton Rulz!

 

 

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5 weeks 5 days ago
 
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"But many continued to stay on, peacefully chanting in the arrivals hall, “Liberate Hong Kong!” and approaching arriving visitors with flyers that listed their demands and explaining the political situation." 

 

 

See the pics on this:

 

https://news.yahoo.com/hong-kong-violence-escalates-police-020156553.html

 

I can't c&p pic, but my fav is young girl with face protection mask (bank robbers thingy) holding sign:

 

" AN EYE for AN EYE "

 

That's message to cops, he he ..

 

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5 weeks 5 days ago
 
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The next stage will be a work stoppage and everybody stays home and throws shit at the troops and makes them blow up the city.

 

I can't wait to see troops try and drag people to work.

 

The unintended consequences of this even if it ends tomorrow are unimaginable over the long run.

Some really great planners though, singing the American national anthem and flag waving will get some attention. I think because Trump want interfere and the western media always do the opposite of Trump, they think western journalists will help bring shame on China. Not sure it will work but they got nothing to lose. Live free or die. My Chinese friends don't understand but they live without freedom and accept it because they know nothing else to compare to.

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5 weeks 4 days ago
 
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https://www.cnet.com/news/anti-surveillance-clothes-foil-cameras-by-making-you-look-like-a-car/

 

This is f**ing brilliant. I got to get some of these clothes. It's much better than giving the finger to red light cameras.

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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NEW YORK, August 15, 2019 — Two members of Hong Kong’s Legislative Council, Dennis Kwok and Alvin Yeung, discuss the current crisis in Hong Kong. ChinaFile editor Susan Jakes moderated the discussion. ... watching it live over u-tube ... excellent!

 

... proposal is to establish independent comission to find out causes for 11-weeks of riots in HK and more ...

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4 weeks 5 days ago
 
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Maybe some rioters are fake. Who are the hand behind them? Western countries? You can't be so sure, politics can get ugly.

Maybe some lost control and did something nasty to the Hongkong police, but did you ever seen how Hongkong police treat the citizen in the past? 

I can't say much on this forum for my own security, you all know.

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4 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Hong Kong protests: Police storm Yuen Long station to disperse protesters

 

 ... today (or yesterday by HK-time 08/22nd) watching over u-Tube, 1:20 minutes long clip:

 

... cops in riot gear with shields, masks and things .... kids on the other side with laser beams, he he ... construction/hokey helmets and face masks standing ... ready ... i.e. come and get me if you dare ... 

These are 18-years olds with  hearts of an elephant ... for 11th week straight ... protesters set off fire extinguishers on the walls of the train station ...

Yuen Long demolished ... and closed for the day at the end.

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Fine read ...:

 

https://nationalinterest.org/feature/what-i-saw-hong-kong-75621

 

August 22, 2019

 

What I Saw in Hong Kong

The people are fighting for their rights and institutions, but things are only getting worse.

by Brenda Hafera 

I spent July in Hong Kong. It’s a regular part of my year, as the director of an international program for undergraduate students. But this summer the city was immersed in protests. And I witnessed something inspirational, disquieting, and foreboding. I saw people fighting for the character of their country. 

Background

Hong Kongers have been protesting since the introduction of an extradition bill which would have allowed citizens, residents, and potentially visitors to be sent to China for trial. The public reaction was as immediate as the implications were recognizable. Under that bill, political dissenters could be handed over to a regime which dubiously defines crimes and where prisoners are made to commit suicide. In the face of such a reality, two million of Hong Kong’s seven million came out in protest. 

 

Though the bill has been suspended, protests have continued for eleven straight weeks. In part, this is because there is an important distinction between “suspended” and “withdrawn.” A suspended bill can be ushered through more rapidly than new legislation subject to normal procedures. Anyone who studies politics knows this is how things are done—wait until people become complacent, and then pass legislation in the quiet of the night. 

But the protests have become about more than the extradition bill as Hong Kongers are now fighting for self-government.

Hong Kong vs. China

Many locals explain the reason for the protests simply as “we do not want to be China.” In 1997, Hong Kong agreed to leave Britain and become part of China if it could maintain a democratic regime and a separate judiciary. Hong Kong has long had its own institutions, intuitions which have cultivated a culture distinct from that of mainland China. They do not even speak the same language.

 

The tension between the two peoples is palpable, especially as there has been an influx of mainlanders to Hong Kong and many undergraduates maintain isolated social circles. Mainland students frequent neighboring restaurants where owners only communicate in Mandarin, rather than the local Cantonese, while Hong Kongers grow more concerned their language is being subverted. 

China also interferes in—and influences—elections in Hong Kong. This leaves Hong Kongers feeling as if they are being forcibly governed by a foreign entity. The extradition bill would have intertwined Hong Kong’s judiciary with China’s, which obeys the party’s whim rather than law and procedure. The Hong Kong people refused to allow their judicial system to be diminished like their electoral system. China threatened Hong Kong’s animating principle: the rule of law. 

 

Who are the Protesters?

On a sunny afternoon in Hong Kong, I observed people of all ages gathering in protest. Mothers were carrying their children, and the shops lining the street were open. Drifting from a loudspeaker was the protesters’ mantra: “Do You Hear the People Sing.” The opening lines reverberated through the streets like a pulse: “Do you hear the people sing? Singing a song of angry men? It is the music of a people who will not be slaves again!” The atmosphere was energetic, lively, and serious.

 

As darkness descends, the crowds become dominated by young people. They are bolder and have less to lose, while some say previous generations favor stability over democracy. 

However, older Hong Kongers are showing their support in other ways. Anecdotes featuring elderly heroes are swirling around Hong Kong. A restaurant owner invited protesters to disguise themselves as customers to dodge police. More financially secure, the middle-aged are leaving clothes at train stations so young people can shed their identifiable black attire before going home. These clothes are also placed alongside money and train tickets which enable a quick exit without the use of personal and traceable cards. Yet, it is unclear where the public opinion of older generations will ultimately fall as they continue to watch their children being tear-gassed.

 

The actions of protesters also give insight into their character. On July 1, the anniversary of when Hong Kong was handed over to China, protesters stormed the Legislative Council and vandalized the building. Yet they left money for drinks they consumed, refusing to be petty looters. They also did not touch the priceless art housed in the building. The protesters protect what is most valuable to Hong Kong. 

In large part, the marches are nonviolent. Of course, there are instances which are deserving of blame. That’s not surprising of a leaderless movement which includes at least two million people. The government has also not responded to their demands, causing the protesters to become more desperate. If the very character of your regime was at stake, where would you draw the line?

 

Police Activity

Concern for police conduct has metastasized itself in the protests. Officers have been using tear gas and rubber bullets liberally. Moreover, on the day protesters targeted the Legislative Council, the police curiously withdrew. Many in Hong Kong speculate this was a trap—that the police were hoping protesters would finally cross the line and subsequently lose the force of public opinion.

 

But the most critical shift in the dynamic between the police, protesters, and the public happened on July 21. That day, protesters, in what was taken as a challenge to Beijing, spray-painted the Chinese Liaison Office and threw paint over the building’s emblem, a symbol of China’s power over Hong Kong. The response was swift. Hours later dozens of alleged triad gang members clad in white appeared in Yuen Long station, which is located in the region closest to China. Armed with steel bars and wooden rods, they targeted those clad in black but also indiscriminately assaulted passengers in the station. 

The police were absent, did not respond to emergency calls, and even shut their doors as the violence ensued. Many Hong Kongers, in disbelief, voiced sadness and despair at being abandoned by their protectors. Others reacted with the disdain and anger felt towards those who have betrayed their own people. 

 

When I asked locals the reason for the police’s behavior, most just shook their heads mournfully, at a loss for words. The best explanation I received is that Beijing learned from the Umbrella Movement of 2014, sit-ins which promoted democracy, and began propagandizing the training of Hong Kong police. 

The police claimed their resources had been depleted by earlier protests. Hong Kongers balked at this justification. Indeed, the Hong Kong police force is formidable and well-organized. On a night during which protesters changed direction and were scattered in multiple locations, in approximately an hour I observed over thirty police buses a block away from protests. There is some disconnect when the police are able to deploy that level of force but could not muster a presence in Yuen Long. 

 

In the days that followed, protesters brazenly announced marches in Yuen Long and near the Liaison Office. A plastic cover appeared over China’s emblem and two-meter high water barriers barred the doors. The same barriers cropped up at entrances of police stations throughout the city. The lines have been drawn. 

 

What Now?

Since Yuen Long, clashes between the police and protesters have escalated. The police are contemplating deploying water cannons with tinted water so protesters can be identified long after they have been sprayed. Meanwhile, protesters are vying for the attention of the international community. Recently, departing and arriving flights were canceled as protesters descended on the airport.

But the protesters face an opponent more formidable than the police. China is tightening its grip on what is a valuable region. Beijing has reaffirmed its support for the police and Chief Executive Carrie Lam. They have also reminded the world it is within their authority to deploy the People’s Liberation Army to Hong Kong. 

Hong Kong is a bastion of not only economic freedom but human freedom in Asia. I am not qualified to recommend the best means for supporting them. Yet echoing in my mind is a line from the protesters’ mantra: “Who will be strong and stand with me?” 

Brenda Hafera is the director of an international program for undergraduate students, based in Hong Kong.

 

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A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs