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Q: "Hong Kong Refuses to bend ... the knee!"

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-12/hong-kong-refuses-bend-knee

 

Sun Tzu, the legendary Chinese general of the 6th century BC Zhou Dynasty, famously wrote in the Art of War:

 

“When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men’s weapons will grow dull and their ardor will be damped. If you lay siege to a town, you will exhaust your strength.”

 

Modern day governments understand this principle very well. And that’s lesson #1 I want to discuss today.

 

If you’ve turned on a television, seen a newspaper, or casually browsed the Internet today, you probably saw some startling news about more protests erupting in Hong Kong.

I told you about this earlier in the week when I was on the ground there– over a million people took to the streets to demonstrate against a Draconian new law that the Hong Kong government is proposing which aims to make it easier to extradite political dissidents to mainland China.

People in Hong Kong are militant about their freedom, and they’re refusing to bend the knee over this proposed law.

 

Yet the government is still pressing ahead despite overwhelming opposition. So much for representative democracy.

Other governments around the world have spoken out about it, including even the United States, which issued a statement expressing “grave concern” about the law.

 

(I’m sure Julian Assange and Edward Snowden are still in disbelief that Uncle Sam has a problem with the extradition of political dissidents…)

 

But… China understands its Sun Tzu very well. This is a siege. Foreign governments, media, and people in Hong Kong are all attacking against this proposed legislation.

more ...

 

 

22 weeks 5 days ago in  Relationships - China

 
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Anyone else suprised how much info / coverage / pics  is getting thru to the Mainland?  What's going on?  I can only figure basically these 3 things...

 

I.  BJ doesn't give fk if it's covered on ML or not....

 

II.  BJ can't block all 'net anymore....

 

III.  The coverage I'm seeing is really not the kind BJ thinks is worth blocking....

 

well,, anyway it just suprised me to see,, mainly the pics...  looks like a good ol' fashioned Central/South American riot to me...

 

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22 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Yeah that's a developing situation for sure. I saw a video today with a group of cops attacking a lone protestor who was just standing there... he caught a lot of boots, batons, maybe a face full of pepper spray.

 

It's things like that that could see things go from tense to out of control.

 

 

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22 weeks 5 days ago
 
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I saw the news on reddit. A number of protestors are injuried in the peaceful protest. The situation is escalating. 

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22 weeks 5 days ago
 
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 I think eventually the people of Hong Kong will give up the protests and just decide to sit at home with a massive work stoppage. What are they going to do, drag everybody to work?

A lot of CCP leaders money are hidden and depend on the Hong Kong economy, just shut the MF'er down. They are trying to tone this down as unimportant, but 1 million of 7 million hit the streets and those numbers are probably low given the suppression pressure already placed on the Hong Kong media. I can't imagine 35 million Americans surrounding the White House or 180 million surrounding Beijing over a law.

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22 weeks 5 days ago
 
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https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-48645342

 

 

 

Well I didn't expect that to happen.

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22 weeks 3 days ago
 
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this kind of thing happened a long time ago when HK's soverienty was returned to Beijing. But when HK became an SAR things changed again. History has a way of predicting the future.

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22 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Anyone else suprised how much info / coverage / pics  is getting thru to the Mainland?  What's going on?  I can only figure basically these 3 things...

 

I.  BJ doesn't give fk if it's covered on ML or not....

 

II.  BJ can't block all 'net anymore....

 

III.  The coverage I'm seeing is really not the kind BJ thinks is worth blocking....

 

well,, anyway it just suprised me to see,, mainly the pics...  looks like a good ol' fashioned Central/South American riot to me...

 

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22 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Wow, I thought the protests were going to stop after they agreed to postpone the law.

 

Nope, they got bigger.

 

 

 

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-48656471

 

 

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22 weeks 1 day ago
 
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It looks, Lam must be gone ...

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-06-18/hong-kongs-lam-offers-sincere-...

 

For the third time since withdrawing the extradition bill over the weekend, embattled Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam has softened her stance on the extradition bill, though she has neither resigned, nor promised that the hated legislation, which catalyzed the biggest street demonstrations since HK was handed back to China, won't be reconsidered.

In a statement on Tuesday, Lam again apologized for her handling of the extradition bill, which she said is now "unlikely" to pass, offering a "sincere and solemn" apology to the people of Hong Kong. Lam said the bill wouldn't be revived until demonstrators' concerns had been addressed.

"I personally have to shoulder much of the responsibility. This has led to controversies, disputes and anxieties in society," Lam said.

"For this I offer my most sincere apology to all people of Hong Kong."

  

Asked by a BBC reporter why she hadn't resigned, Lam said her decision to withdraw the bill showed she was listening. She said she understood that she needed to "do better."

 

Her statement marked the first press conference since some 2 million demonstrators, more than one-quarter of HK's population, took to the streets for a largely peaceful march on Sunday.

 

Lam said she would not resign and insisted that the extradition law would be left on the books until it legally expires in just over a year. She said only protesters who had used violence would not need to worry about rioting charges, citing a previous statement from the city’s police chief.

While Lam said her government had "stopped all work" on the extradition bill, Lam refused to confirm that the bill had been truly abandoned. That's bound to anger demonstrators, who see abandoning the bill as an essential condition. Already, one protest leader has slammed Lam's statement.

Jimmy Sham of Civil Human Rights Front said: "We don’t need to hear her feelings. We want her to respond to our demands..."

For now, at least, it looks like Lam will hang on. She retains the support of Beijing, and the Executive Council Secretariat issued a statement of support in response to Lam's statement.

 

But the threat of more civil unrest will continue to create problems for Lam's government, as protests have brought commerce in the Hong Kong to a virtual standstill. There's also the fear that Beijing might soon find it easier to sacrifice Lam to ensure that the unrest doesn't spread across the border into Shenzen.

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21 weeks 6 days ago
 
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I am sure Lam is authorized to do and say ONLY what she is told to do and say. The people in HK know this. Her appoligies mean nothing. She will eventually be replaced by the people who appointed her.

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21 weeks 6 days ago
 
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But for Beijing it is still a high-stakes gamble. At least 60 per cent of overseas direct investment into China flows through the city — and it remains the primary offshore market for the renminbi, which the People’s Bank of China one day hopes to make a truly international currency. “Hong Kong still serves as China’s most important international financial centre,” says Peter Cheung, professor of politics at the University of Hong Kong. “Any capital flight, [the] leaving of major business or concerns about Hong Kong’s stability as an international financial centre would be of concern to the mainland.”">

Money talks bullshit walks.

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21 weeks 5 days ago
 
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