The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Q: Is this a success of the wumaos ?

SCMP has this article today about student protests in Taiwan being a failure of democracy

 

http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1456109/student-occupation-and-cl...

 

This raises a couple of questions. 

1. Does Chinese schools have ANY education about different types of government and different political ideologies ? 

2. Does this mean that Taiwan is not part of China; because China doesn't have democracy and if it can fail in Taiwan it must mean that Taiwan is not part of China. 

3. .... sigh....

 

 

CSmack has some of the comments translated here http://www.chinasmack.com/2014/stories/taiwan-students-protest-china-trade-pact-occupy-parliament.html

 

6 years 15 weeks ago in  Culture - China

 
Answers (6)
Comments (3)
Posts: 2634

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

first off..... I am a retired simpleton

 

Q.1 .... I  seriously doubt that Chinese are taught anything about politics around the world in school, at least until their last year of university

 

Q.2 ... Taiwan is not part of China..... neither is ...  and neither is ...  

 

while the population is huge and thus "the market"....  how in the hell do you get blood from a stone?...then again, many millionaires (shear numbers does this)...but the other billion have nothing and will never have anything to contribute to a flourishing market....fast food is an obvious exception ...... ...

 

like I said......  simpleton!!!

 

 

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
Posts: 3263

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Democracy is a model of political organization/management.

Ransacking a building while holding banners is rioting. Those students are rioting because they somehow (I honestly don't know if they are right or wrong) feel unheard and that the only way to get heard is ... rioting. They claim that some very important decision is made, without any consultation of the people, which is not how things are supposed to roll in Taiwan.

1. It might depends on which school, and which generation. One friend told me that she though "democracy" means "everybody does what the heck they want to do", something close to "anarchy". My wife told me she was told that it means that decision is equally distributed amongst the group. My sample size is 2 individuals ^^

2. LOL. Face and self-coherency are mutually exclusive.

3. Yes, using a riot to denigrate anything that is convenient to denigrate, paint me surprised. Of course, trying to understand why the students seems so damn worried and angry, nope.

[PS] This post is not to excuse vandalism. I personally believe that one can make his voice heard without vandalizing property. I also believe making your voice heard peacefully requires a damn good preparation and lots of determination.

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

To answer your questions, I'd say that :

1. They do, but just like with everything else, it always comes with an attached justification for why the CCP dystopian dictatorship is the best governing form in the universe. "Oh, look at how messy democracy is, look at how China is harmonious and united in comparison..." and blah and blah and blah. Oh, yeah, and the first year of mainland university is entirely dedicated to political brainwashing, for those who didn't know. This is why it takes 4 years.

2. Shut Up It's Magic. D&D players know the deal.

 

Now, for "netizens" reactions, I had a quick look at the media portals, ans I just saw the usual deal of wumaos being boring as ever, and people trying to refer to You-Know-What events in subtle ways (unsubtle ways are probably gone already), or just saying that "students are easy to brainwash". Not sure if there is a duplicity intended there.

 

Didn't bother reading the articles, I know what's in them already.

Side note : definitely seems strange to see Chinese gathering up and protesting for something else than unpaid wages or village riot. Catches me every time I see HK/TW news.

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Yeah I heard about China's response. Made me laugh.   I just ignore any news posted by the mainland in regards to things like this.  It's like Mark Twain said: "If you don't read the newspaper you're uninformed. If you read the newspaper you're misinformed."

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I think also what part of the problem is, is that people think 'democracy' means everyone gets what they want. They don't! It just means that (in theory) the majority decides what's best for everyone...

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

1. You may recall that last year Xi Jinping introduced a list of seven topics that Chinese teachers are no longer allowed to discuss. Amongst them was "alternative forms of government".

 

2. That would be the obvious and logical conclusion. Therefore - not the conclusion a Chinese person would make. I think Chinese people are supposed to conclude that the students are acting that way because of American interference in China's affairs. Not because China has a horrible government that wants to invade and subjugate Taiwan. Not at all.

 

3. Indeed.

 

By the way - I think public protest and saying no to China are very good signs of democracy.

 

Report Abuse
6 years 15 weeks ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs