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Posts: 18927

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Q: Is there a lack of native English teachers in China?

Relevant details out of yer favorite ... 

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/shocking-overhaul-china-bans-profit-tu...

 

In Shocking Overhaul China Bans For-Profit Tutoring, Wiping Out Billions In Value

 

Call it the end of "capitalism with Chinese characteristics" and the beginning of "socialism with socialist characteristics."

One day after Chinese tutoring and techedu stocks cratered the most in history after a report that China was seeking to ban for-profit school tutoring companies in a sweeping overhaul of the education sector, Beijing has done just that and on Saturday China unveiled an unprecedented crackdown on its $100 billion education tech sector, banning companies that teach the school curriculum from making profits, raising capital or going public.

The reason: as we explained yesterday, Beijing is scapegoating the sector for its own failure to reverse the ongoing shrinkage of China's population, and is blaming declining birth rates on "financial burdens from raising a child" as a result of surging tutoring costs. Apparently it never occurred to Beijing that the local housing bubble for example - the biggest in Chinese history - may have a far greater role in making "discretionary" spending - such as more children for example - impossible as the simplest of staples cost an arm and a kidney and apparently a second (and first) child. But of course, Xi would have to take the blame for that particular bubble; in the case of rampant tutoring costs, it's easier just to blame someone else.

And that's precisely what Beijing is doing with the following list of new regulations on the education sector:

  • *Companies and institutions that teach the school curriculum must go non-profit

  • *Such institutions cannot pursue IPOs, or take foreign capital

  • *Listed companies will be prohibited from issuing stock or raising money in capital markets to invest in school-subject tutoring institutions, or acquiring their assets via stock or cash

  • *Foreign firms are banned from acquiring or holding shares in school curriculum tutoring institutions, or using VIEs (variable interest entities) to do so. Those already in violation need to rectify the situation

  • *All vacation and holiday cirriculum tutoring is off-limits

  • *Online tutoring and school-curriculum teaching for kids below six years of age is forbidden

  • *Agencies cannot teach foreign curriculums

The unprecedented regulatory overhaul published on Saturday, threatens to up-end the sector and jeopardize billions of dollars in foreign investment. As previewed yesterday, tutoring companies that teach school subjects can no longer accept overseas investment, which could include capital from the offshore registered entities of Chinese firms; Companies in violation of that rule must take steps to rectify the situation, the country’s most powerful administrative authority said, without elaborating.

Additionally, public tutoring companies will no longer be allowed to raise capital via stock markets to invest in businesses that teach classroom subjects, while outright acquisitions are forbidden; all vacation and weekend tutoring related to the school syllabus is now off-limits. Finally, online tutoring agencies will also be forbidden from accepting pupils under the age of six. To make up for the shortfall, China will improve the quality of state-run online education services and make them free of charge, the State Council said, a good reminder that China is and always will be first and foremost a despotic, communist regime.

“All regions can no longer approve new subject-based off-campus training institutions for students in the compulsory education stage, and existing subject-based training institutions are uniformly registered as non-profit institutions,” according to the State Council notice.

13 weeks 3 days ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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My opinion - for what its worth - the direction is good - too bad if all the capitalist money leaves to go promulgate inequalities eslewhere - every child deserves a good education yet at the same time needs to play and have free time to socialize. Globally common sense is in short supply but its refreshing to see good family values once again. The children are our future and as a parent I can say GOOD JOB.

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12 weeks 9 hours ago
 
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I wonder how this will play out. I've been hearing training schools aren't too worried about it, I'd have thought it would be a huge problem for them.

 

Time will tell I suppose.

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13 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Minor Official

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Now you mention it.. the company I work for has less native English teachers recently. They operate in two campuses of the university and there has been huge fall in teaching staff for the past year. Not sure if the company will hire more new ones or not. Even the HR and the Director of Studies are worried about this. 

 

And Stiggs is right "I wonder how this will play out" and "Time will tell". 

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13 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Only party members should be able to receive an education

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13 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Crackdown in China all over the business place ... not only at the Education sector ...

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/everyone-crosshairs-china-sees-panic-s...

 

After China implemented a highly publicized crackdown on tutoring and techedu companies, wiping out tens of billions in value as Beijing confirmed it ordered the "for profit" publicly traded sector to, well, no longer be "for profit" while banning them from raising capital or going public - a move which has been viewed as the government’s most extreme step yet to rein in private businesses that regulators blame for exacerbating inequality, increasing financial risk and in the case of some tech titans challenging Beijing’s authority - Beijing has extended its unprecedented crackdown to various other sectors to extend to housing, tech and even food companies.

So after plunging on Friday when the news of the crackdown first hit, on Monday shares of Chinese education stocks listed in the US plunged some more: among the casualties, TAL Education Group tumbled -36%, New Oriental Education & Technology Group was down -32%; Gaotu Techedu - the stock popularized by Archegos whose total return swaps pushed it as high as $149 in January wiping out all the shorts, slumped another -36% and dropped as low as $1,70 this morning while China Online Education Group -11%.

To understand just how unexpected Beijing's crackdown was, consider the following: New Oriental Education & Technology's Hong Kong shares still had 15 analyst buy ratings and just one “underweight” as of Monday, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, after plunging more than 40% for a second straight session.

 

Other major tech and education-linked names were also hit: Alibaba, a Chinese tech conglomerate listed in the U.S. which among other things, invests in education companies, fell -4.9%; Didi Global continued its plunge, down 13% and dropping as low as $7, or half its IPO price of $14; JD.com -6.3%; Baidu -7%; Pinduoduo -13%; NetEase -7.2%; Nio -6.7%; Xpeng -6.4%; Li Auto -4.2% and so on. Today's rout means that the Nasdaq Golden Dragon China Index, which slumped last week posting its longest losing streak since 2019 over the risks posed by a potentially widening regulatory crackdown in the nation’s technology industry, is set for even more pain.

However, the crash wouldn't be confined just to the education sector.

With losses in Chinese tech and education stocks now exceeding $1 trillion since February, the questions reverberating across trading desks from Shanghai to New York are where regulators might strike next and whether markets are properly discounting regulatory risk. Property-management and food-delivery companies were among the biggest losers on Monday after Beijing signaled tighter rules for both sectors, while also lashing out at music streaming giant Tencent Music.

Tencent Music ADRs plunged in US premarket trading after Chinese regulators ordered the company to give up exclusive music streaming rights and pay half a million yuan in fines. ADRs of the recently IPOed company dropped 19% to $8.70, while Parent company Tencent Holdings sank 7.7% in Hong Kong, with investors Prosus and Naspers drop as much as 8.9% and 6.9%, respectively. This enforcement action made Tencent the latest Chinese internet giant to be brought to heel by regulators.

It wouldn't be the last. As China expanded on whirlwind crackdowns, Chinese food delivery giant Meituan’s shares -with 56 buys and no sells - also plunged as much as 15%, the most on record, after China issues new rules for food platforms. On Monday the government posted notices that online food platforms must respect the rights of delivery staff and ensure that those workers earn at least the local minimum income, according to guidelines released by seven agencies including the powerful State Administration for Market Regulation. And with Meituan the largest food-delivery service in the country, it naturally would be hit the hardest.

As Bloomberg adds, the Tencent-backed company is already grappling with an investigation into alleged monopolistic behavior. The food industry regulations, which echo previous warnings, came days after China unveiled a broad set of reforms for private and online education companies, seeking to decrease workloads for students and overhaul a sector it says has been “hijacked by capital.”

But wait, there's more: Evergrande Property Services Group, a unit of the massively levered Evergrande property developer, sank 12% after major Chinese policy-making bodies collectively issued a three-year timeline for bringing “order” to the property sector, long under scrutiny due to an excessive buildup of leverage among home-buyers and developers. The announcement detailed punishments for a range of transgressions by businesses in real estate development, home sales, housing rentals and property management services.

Beijing’s myriad clampdowns have shocked even some of the most seasoned China watchers, prompting a rethink of how far Xi Jinping’s Communist Party is willing to go as it tightens its grip on the world’s second-largest economy.

While some investors say the selloff has created buying opportunities, ongoing clampdowns on everything from internet platform operators to commodities producers and China’s gargantuan real estate industry suggest plenty of room for more surprises, especially for international investors as Xi’s government shows less concern than its predecessors did about spooking foreign capital.

As Goldman’s sales desk summed it up this morning, "Even when you think China risk is priced…it can get worse."

“Everybody’s in the cross-hairs,” said Fraser Howie, an independent analyst and co-author of books on Chinese finance qutoed by Bloomberg. “This is a very difficult environment to navigate, when over the weekend your business can basically be written down to zero by state edict, how on Earth are you to plan for that?”

... more ...

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13 weeks 1 day ago
 
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2-years old article I came across ... 

 

https://www.studyinternational.com/news/precarious-times-foreign-teacher...

 

Precarious times for foreign teachers in China

 

" ... This combination of factors has led to warnings that foreigners must be cautious about moving to live and work in China. As Dan Harris, a Seattle-based lawyer whose firm represents foreign companies who do business in China, explains, “The risks of going to China to teach far outweigh the rewards ..."

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12 weeks 6 days ago
 
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You all better drink some warm chicken blood   for boosting of the energy levels ... at this thread. 

This energetic recipe might be straight out of TCM ...

 

https://www.reuters.com/world/china/chinese-parents-fret-after-governmen...

 

Chinese parents fret after government bans for-profit tutoring firms

 

HONG KONG, July 26 (Reuters) - Anxious Chinese parents were rushing to hire private tutors to help their children navigate a fiercely competitive education system after the government moved last week to rein in companies in the massive tutoring services industry.

China's for-profit education sector has been under scrutiny as part of Beijing's push to ease pressure on school children and reduce a cost burden on parents that has contributed to a drop in birth rates.

New rules, to be implemented immediately, ban companies from making a profit from teaching core school subjects and offering classes on weekends or holidays. read more

But though many parents welcomed an effort to reduce the long hours their children spend studying, others said the ban would only add to parents' financial burdens and increase inequality.

 

After-school tutoring (AST) classes are seen as crucial to academic success in China's notoriously difficult college entrance exam.

More than 75% of K-12 students - roughly aged from six to 18 - in China attended after-school tutoring classes in 2016, according to the most recent figures from the Chinese Society of Education, and anecdotal evidence suggests that percentage has risen.

"Parents around me are actively looking for more one-on-one private tutors. It doesn't feel like a sudden stop of the tutoring frenzy, life goes on as before," said Ms Fan, a mother living in Beijing's Haidian district, renowned for its top universities and competitive academic environment. She declined to give her full name, as did the other parents interviewed.

Private tutors can charge between 600 yuan and 2,000 yuan($93-$310) per hour in the capital, depending on the teacher's experience, said Judith Bai, a mother in Haidian, who already spends more than 20,000 yuan on math and Chinese tutoring for her seven-year-old son each year.

 

"The new regulations will likely put more pressure on parents. With fewer AST services available, many Haidian parents around me are busy booking private tutors and organizing small tutoring groups on their own. The whole process is becoming more challenging and time-consuming for parents."

Rather than encouraging people to have more children, halting tutoring would only dissuade them, said Min, mother to a three-year-old living in Beijing.

"People want to have babies because there's hope that the kids can live a better life than the parents. But with the economic slowdown and no more tutoring in China, we don't know that for sure anymore. We're not considering having more babies," she said.

Parents in smaller cities where schools tend to have less funding said the policy would negatively impact their children who rely on after-school classes to make up for low quality teaching in classes of up to 60 kids.

 

China's Ministry of Education will work on improving the quality of the country's schools "to reduce the impulse of parents to send their children to off-campus training", reported official news agency Xinhua on Sunday.

But even with an improvement in teaching, many said it would be impossible to overcome the competitive nature of China's system.

Ms Huang, a mother from Hangzhou in eastern China, said she has quickly signed her son up to a math class run by a tutoring company before the firm closes to new registrations.

 

"As long as there is the test-based system in China, it is impossible for parents not to 'chicken their babies'," she said, using a popular term in parenting circles that describes pumping children with extracurricular classes and energy-boosting "chicken blood".

 

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12 weeks 6 days ago
 
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That has been the trend for the last 10 years. First, it was the non-speaking English country ren, then the Chinese returnees after their study abroad, and then anyone else who can speak English and look the part Smile

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12 weeks 5 days ago
 
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My opinion - for what its worth - the direction is good - too bad if all the capitalist money leaves to go promulgate inequalities eslewhere - every child deserves a good education yet at the same time needs to play and have free time to socialize. Globally common sense is in short supply but its refreshing to see good family values once again. The children are our future and as a parent I can say GOOD JOB.

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12 weeks 9 hours ago
 
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My high school renewed all foreign teachers for the next year, despite a significant decrease in international department enrollment for next year. Perhaps this is an oddity among public school programs or just our school. 

 

China seems to try to mirror the failed policy that Korea took a few years ago. Korea has since reversed their policy for training schools. I suspect that China will need to do the same thing. Afterall, what will parents do with their kids when they are still at work and the kids are sent home. It was not just about education, but childcare. In America, we called these kids "latchkey" kids. 

 

I do applaud China for trying to take the absurd amount of homework and studies from the kids. The problem facing China is that there are few things to fill in the gaps. In America, there are after-school programs, various entertainment outlets, and other resources. In China, there is KTV, walking the streets and malls, cafes, and the cinema for the kids. No real organized sports teams, after school activities like band or theater, or Youth clubs (YMCA/Boy Scouts). 

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11 weeks 3 days ago
 
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@icnif77 An off topic question. You're from the Philippines, right? I send a prayer to Philippines. Just got off with my friend who works at 51Talk in Makati, They've all been given a one month notice. That's over 30,000 employees.

 

Lucky nzteacher80 with his native English passport ... 'cause I've retired from English teaching ... 

10 weeks 4 days ago
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Stiggs:

Hell, now I want to give you a job...

10 weeks 3 days ago
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icnif77:

 "The mill in Istanbul was also the only joint I have ever worked together with the native English teachers, just so you'll know ... how lucky-strike you were in China ... we've never met."      

 

 

   No, thank you ... @Stiggs ... I ain't native Engl  ish sneaker. 

 

I am reading this RL again and ... can you see the lower case 'i'-s, letter 'i'?? ... These are Turkish 'i'-s without the dot. RL was written over the Turkish computer.

... 'abılıty' written with Turkish keyboard, i.e. lower case letter ' i ' without the dot ...

10 weeks 3 days ago
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Stiggs:

I always thought I'd like to go to Turkey for a year, see what life is like in that part of the world.

 

Oh well, can't see that happening anytime soon.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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icnif77:

You won't be appreciated as an English teacher. Wages around 7 EUR per class, no benefits whatsoever.

Maybe a bit better at International Schools, but you must have native English passport. I mean, I don't know how is at International schools in Turkey 'cause I don't qualify.

 

Going for the short vacation, yes ..., but working as a teacher, no. Much better places around the world than Turkey. 

Whole that area is the same, Russia, Turkey, Armenia and more ... They all want to learn English, but wages are too low.

I was doing over 40 classes per week for 5 - 6 EUR per class and no benes. I was just happy by doing good in Istanbul, i.e. being better than anybody else, so I didn't care for the monies much.

Also students appreciated ... when the word spread around among the students, I had a million classes .. most of them per request. I had 4 private students at once and none of them was assigned by the DOS. Workload at privates was over 60h each. These were all classes per request ..

I am guessing, native English passport holder can squeeze 7 or 8 EUR per class, no more.

Turkish International schools is a different matter, but still low pay comparable to other countries.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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Stiggs:

The idea wasn't to get rich there, just have enough to be comfortable while I saw a new country. It was never a concrete plan or anything, just something I always thought I'd like to do and maybe, one day....

 

But anyway, like I said, can't see that happening in the near future.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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icnif77:

You should aim at International schools, not as walk-in as I did. You'll get an apartment and 1000 EUR per month tops. 1-year contract.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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Stiggs:

That sounds alright, I assume the cost of living wouldn't be more than a thousand euros?

 

When Turkey puts out their fires, gets the covid situation under control and everything open and running normally again maybe I'll revisit that idea.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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icnif77:

With free apartment as a bonus, you could save some 200-300 EUR per month by not eating out and partying often. All booze is more expensive than in EU, tobacco, too. You can get rolling tobacco in bulk for decent price from small, private retailers, i.e. roll yer own.

Food cost in Turkey is similar to EU ... you'll get an abundance of cheap fruits and veggies., but all meat, diary and fish match EU prices.

If you look at Turkey as a state, you should look internationally. Turkish army is involved in every conflict in the wider area. Syria, Iraq, Libya, Kazakhstan/Nagorno-Karabakh ... somebody has to pay for all these ... Also Vlad's S-400 system in Turkey, i.e. the most advanced defence armament in the world wasn't cheap.

You'll experience high inflation (over 80% Y-o-Y) with relatively high cost of living in Turkey ... High inflation is combined with 'never receive a pay raise ..', ... twice or trice more expensive than China, ET wage is also way below the Chinese wage ...

Visit-yes, work-no ... IMO.

 

10 weeks 3 days ago
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Stiggs:

Good to know, thanks.

 

Fock it, I can't see the situation going anywhere but downhill there, I'll move Turkey back down on the list of possible future plans.

10 weeks 3 days ago
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icnif77:

I forgot to mention the transportation cost, especially if you live in any big city in Turkey and working as a 'walk-in' as I did.

I was working at the several different mills and many companies, banks in and around the 20 million residents city. All mills, companies and privates were yearning for the different English College Entrance exams prep. teacher, as TOEFL, both IELTS Exams, SAT, GMAT, GED, GRE and more. I forgot the titles of other English Entrance exams, but there were like 7 or 8 different ones .. and I was doing prep for all of them.  

I was coaching students at the Turkish Airlines for the Cabin Crew Exams ... using practice test website with the name "Paddle Your Own Kanoo" ...  .

It's an authentic Cabin Crew prep website, just the name cracks me up.

 

It was a thing in Istanbul, mill's manager would always ask you: "Do you want to take this group?" or "Can you prepare for this Exam?" and after yer confirmation, they would give you the timing and place of the first class.

After a while, managers had stopped asking a questions. They would just say or send a text, "New private student (name) for SAT Exam in Sisli (address) with the date and time of the first class and no. of the booked classes." ... and I'd reply: "I'll be there ..." or "OK", which meant I accept and have free time for the classes ..

The thingy was, I've never replied: "Ohh, I can't prepare for this Exam..". I only had to look at my existing schedule and tell them when I have free time.

After I completed the first TOEFL prep. course, I've taken them all, the Exams ...   .

It was very popular thingy at that time and I was all over the city, having an architects, MA/post-graduate students, bankers, business owners, even the head of the city's coppery and the director of the huge mall's security firm as a private students. Ordinary cops, too, working at some tourists saturated park,

In the same time, I was teaching groups Beginner courses, too. Days-of-the-Week, Present Simple Tense and all ...

 

... remembering my Istanbul's English teaching gigs "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" resonates in my ears ...  angel 

 

English teaching experience I have from China is like working in a 'kindergarten-for-a-life-time' comparable to Istanbul's, curriculum and otherwise ... except in China I had to became an expert in Contractual law ...'cause of the thieving bastards all over the place.

The other difference is in China students don't have or have only minimal saying about the assigned foreign teacher. In Turkey, if one or more students dislike you for some reason, you'll be gone before the next scheduled class ... Turkish English students are treated as a payees with all consumer protection rights,

 

OK, where was I? ... public transportation around Istanbul is new, modern with U-bahn (underground train), local busses, dolmush (private mini van) and so called 'finicular'. It's an ordinary gondola at some parts of the city, which takes you from one U-bahn stop to another and dolmush lifts you by the road from one part of the city to another for a ride of 20 or more km.

 

Istanbul is the city built in between the huge hill and sea. When they've filled the space below the hill close to the sea, they've started with buildings up the hill. Anywhere you turn in Istanbul is a hill, most at the 45 degrees ... I hate walking up-hill. I have an animosity toward the hills ... especially toward the up-move.

It's no different than in Nepal, but in Himalayas you have a minivans. You aren't required to walk (if you don't want to) like in Istanbul.

 

The transportation cost in the city will set you back some 30 EUR per week or more, which is a lot considering wage of less than 1000 EUR/month, which you will hardly get even with the native English passport, i.e. working at the International school.

Istanbul isn't worth to be working as an English teacher.

 

Woow, this turned into a long reply. Sorry, I had a kind of English teaching deja-vu, but English teaching was my best and the most enjoyable working experience to date ...

10 weeks 3 days ago
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Stiggs:

"English teaching was my best and the most enjoyable working experience to date ..."

 

I enjoyed it too, liked living in China also. Turkey still sounds like a great place to live for a while (except for the hills, I hate hills too) but possibly not as an English teacher.

10 weeks 2 days ago
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icnif77:

I remember my lesson on how to explain the meaning of the sentence "I have to go pee ..." to the Beginner level in Istanbul (most of them Syrian refugees, i.e. religious) without using of profanity ...

It still cracks me up ... I'm like "Who did that? That can't be me ..." 

 

I also think, that's the main reason why DOS Lynn wrote on RL "... his explanation of simple English concepts is truly superior ..."  

Before I posted Q on that 'lesson' here, I asked first at the mill's teachers office in Istanbul. Since, nobody could 'lit-a-light' to my Q, I had to go on with the show-you ...

Black dude from Philly was eager to repeat my moves while DOS and the rest of the crew were watching my 6-steps presentation ...

 

Do you know what I must do first when I encounter the hill while walking?

I must rest first 'cause only the view at the hill I have to climb kills me ... I tell you, I was always the sportish man ... 

Now, Istanbul is kind of special hills wise. All hills there are at 45*. I ain't exaggerating. It isn't just 'Ohhh, well ..' feeling. when you face the hill in Istanbul. Anywhere you walk there you'll encounter 45* degrees hill and I am a walker.

 

Once, I sorted out at which part of the city some address is and which U-bahn lines I must take and where to exit, you'd think 'I am all set. Let's go ...'.

No way, Jose! You better be ready for one or two Himalayan 45* treks after the U-bahn's exit stop to reach your destination address.

Even the huge shopping malls in some parts of the city have 'climbs in the program ...'

 

I don't think, I'll ever return to this city voluntarily ...

10 weeks 2 days ago
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icnif77:

I forgot to comment on China ...

 

The best part of China were the contracts for working as an English teacher with:

 

"... 56 classes (45') per month for 8000 Rmb (9 X 8000) - no office hours, with full 3 months recess and half pay (3 X 4000 Rmb) ... in 1-year contract" as my best one from 2012/13.

It was for the working at Fuk.'s, Xinjiang Public Primary School with free apartment and return flight home ... Apartment was huge, 2-bedroom bottom one with the garden and double exits. PIA to keep cleaning it, he he.

That is 14 X 45' classes or 10 full hours of working time per week in total. I was thinking to accept extra work at the other Primaries in the city just 'cause of the abundance of free time, but then I walked in the nature around the city and slept, instead. I've cooked and ate a lot, too. I had a tonne of free time ...

This contract offer was so high because Beijing's gov. gave an incentives at that time for any school in Xinjiang wanted to hire laowai English teacher.

It was Bj's support for the undeveloped areas in China, but I tell you, English level of the Chinese students in Xinjiang is the highest in the whole China, I've worked before and after my stint in Xinjiang.

Chinese English teachers there are also a level above of any Chinese English teacher I've met in other parts of China ... English pronunciation wise.

I would/wanted to coach them only at the teaching approach they had, but at English language subject I was like 'WOOW ...'.

Back to the Chinese contracts ... After I completed contract in Xinjiang, my pay at other schools didn't decrease. I accepted contracts with few (2-4) extra required teaching hours, but not for the the lower pay.

 

You won't meet such a contract offers anywhere abroad, i.e. out of China ...

 

I've faced Istanbul's offers with over 130 classes per month for the same or a bit higher pay ...

The thingy in Turkey was also different because I didn't want to complete so many classes. I just had to 'cause of the students' demand ... Where's my mirror?  

Is nzteacher80 undercovers, in hiding? ... 

I miss the guy's take on the English word 'successfu-li-lly' ... 

10 weeks 2 days ago
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Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: My friends who are managing schools still can't recruit from outside o
A:My friends who are managing schools still can't recruit from outside of China because of the borders being closed, as far as I know that doesn't look like it's going to change anytime soon. If you have a current existing residence permit etc you can re-enter the country, going through the usual quarantine process obviously but no new visas are being issued. I don't know about business visas but I suspect it wouldn't be much different. For up to date info you could probably contact the Chinese embassy in your country. -- Stiggs