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Q: Where's everyone here?

Can I say ... "Make sure you type with the face mask  on ..."

 

I'll tell you, you can't go into the Bank in EU dressed same as you walk outdoors in China ...

 

I want to hear ... how is in your city! Let's go ...

24 weeks 4 days ago in  General  - China

 
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I am in Shenzhen Longgang,very quiet here.My  started school online yesterday.I am bored.getting a bit fed up.but over the last couple of months been doing the keto diet and for the past 3 weeks been doing a tefl course with bridge education.

 

also playing a lot of play station,watching tv only going out to do food shopping.

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24 weeks 3 hours ago
 
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I got home to my country on Sunday after a 52 hour journey. Not sure when or if I will ever return to China. Before I left Zhengzhou, there were a lot of restrictions and few people (and cars) on the streets. Most shops were closed except supermarkets and mini marts. Some residential areas severely restricting when people can go out.

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24 weeks 4 days ago
 
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I left China for three weeks . . . six weeks ago. Can't get back in. Damn the bad luck, I'll just wait out this "I eat bats and cause world-wide pandemics" virus at a beach in Thailand.

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24 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Still in China. Haven't been able to leave my building in two weeks. 

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24 weeks 2 days ago
 
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In china too,,,,  up north,,, quite a ways from Wuhan.....   I've been staying in apartment 97% of the time.  Just runs to local supermarket.

 

at least 7 confirmed cases in city.....  campus very much on lockdown,,,  we will conduct online classes until,,, well until whenever...

 

I feel really ill today.  

 

Massive headace, Body ache, sore arms, eyes hurt,, mostly eye sockets, like been punched in the eyes.  chills,, lethargy,,,  had nap and bit tongue medium bad,, had blod in salive/phlegm, trouble concentrating, legs sore,, but not as sore as arms,, back sore some too....

 

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24 weeks 2 days ago
 
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a good topical Q from OP But such a poor responce shows how poinless this site is................ SHUT DOWN

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24 weeks 2 days ago
 
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https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3050791/missing-chinese-...

 

Missing Chinese citizen journalists highlight risks of telling Wuhan’s story during coronavirus outbreak

*Chen Qiushi and Fang Bin had become well-known for their reports from the city at the centre of the Covid-19 outbreak, but both are now thought to have been taken away by the authorities

*Tightly controlled state media has tried to put a positive gloss on the situation despite the rising death toll from the disease

Linda Lev ... Published: 4:23pm, 15 Feb, 2020

The disappearances of two prominent citizen journalists who dare to challenged China’s online censorship during the Covid-19 outbreak has heightened concerns about how far residents and activists will be allowed to challenge the official narrative.

Chen Qiushi, a lawyer, and Fang Bin, a Wuhan resident who became well known after he released a video clip of dead bodies in a van outside a major hospital, both disappeared last week.

The last video Chen posted was one of him interviewing a Wuhan native called A Ming, whose father died almost two weeks ago.

A Ming had described how his father probably contracted the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 during a visit to Wuhan Union Hospital at the beginning of January for a health check-up. There were no safety precautions in place at the time.

 

During their conversation Chen noted that “many people are worried I will be detained” and he was last heard from on February 7.

 

His friend Xu Xiaodong, an MMA fighter who has become well known for challenging and defeating traditional martial arts practitioners, said Chen had been forcibly quarantined but no one knew where he was.

The Wuhan resident had become well known for the videos he filmed at the city’s hospitals and had called for people to resist the Communist Party.

 

The pair were two of the most high-profile citizen journalists documenting the Covid-19 outbreak and highlighting stories that did not appear in China’s tightly controlled state media, including photographs of dead bodies in hospital corridors and piled up in vans.

Although some established media outlets, including Caixin and Sanlian Lifeweek, have published unusually in-depth and critical reports, there are still lines they cannot cross.

By contrast, state media outlets have stuck to the official line and focused on the government’s efforts to tackle the epidemic.

Fu King-wa, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Hong Kong said transparent reporting was hard to do in mainland China and citizen journalists played an important role in “informing the public and filling a gap that state media cannot fill”.

But by doing so they risk falling foul of the law, which requires reporters to have a press card issued by the General Administration of Press and Publication.

Only those working for registered media can apply for the card and reporters who work without one

risk being punished for illegal reporting under the cybersecurity law.

The Covid-19 outbreak, which is thought to have originated in Wuhan, has so far killed more than 1,500 people and infected more than 66,000.

The authorities put the city in lockdown on January 23 and neighbouring cities in Hubei followed suit soon afterwards.

Many Chinese people have gained an insight into what life is like in the cities thanks to ordinary residents sharing videos, pictures or stories on social media.

For instance, one woman known as Xiaohang documented her feelings of despair and helplessness as her parents fell ill and died.

She later fell ill herself, last posting on February 9, and her current condition is unknown.

But such stories are in stark contrast to the official media’s reporting. For example, on January 23, the day Wuhan went into lockdown, the evening news bulletin from state broadcaster CCTV led with a speech President Xi Jinping gave at a Lunar New Year celebration and devoted less than three minutes of the 50-minute broadcast to the outbreak.

Around a third of that report was devoted to the World Health Organisation’s support for China’s efforts in fighting the outbreak.

The Australian-based political artist and dissident Badiucao said Chinese state media was notorious for only portraying the positive aspects whenever a crisis hits.

“Whenever something tragic happens, they turn it into a celebration of heroes and heroines … Everyone seems happy that China is still strong and can deal with any situation,” he said.

Badiucao has been publishing a series called the Wuhan Diaries, written by a city resident who got in touch with him after a social media appeal for information about life inside the city.

Badiucao said that for safety reasons he did not know any personal information about the author and he has been working with a team of volunteers to translate the diary entries.

The first entry, published on January 27, described panic buying in Wuhan supermarkets. The author also criticised the central government for its handling of the outbreak.

The author noted that officials from Wuhan and Hubei had been the main focus of criticism, but wrote “I see it differently! Are they the only ones who shall take responsibility!”

Badiucao said that if more people became citizen journalists the risk would be more widely shared.

“We need more people to serve as citizen journalists,” he said. “A lot of journalists in China, young journalists, are risking their lives in Wuhan by reporting on the frontline. But they face restrictions. Citizen journalists complement those reporters.”

 

But while citizen journalists can share valuable information, there is also a danger that they will help spread misinformation.

Hong Kong University’s Fu said the nature of social media means that any content uploaded online, verified or not, can spread quickly and widely.

“If they do not do the job well, that could be dangerous because people trust them. They could post something and delete it, but the content would remain in the public domain,” he said.

Badiucao agreed that this was a risk, but said it was unavoidable given the tight controls on information in mainland China.

He pointed out that the author of the diary is “locked in this information black hole as well”.

He continued: “All the author can see or hear is the other people who are in similar conditions. So there must be misinformation, misunderstanding of the information,” he said.

“But the diary, it is a kind of an internal reflection that is really loyal to the feeling of how life is inside there.”

 

 

 

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24 weeks 2 days ago
 
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I am in Shenzhen Longgang,very quiet here.My  started school online yesterday.I am bored.getting a bit fed up.but over the last couple of months been doing the keto diet and for the past 3 weeks been doing a tefl course with bridge education.

 

also playing a lot of play station,watching tv only going out to do food shopping.

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24 weeks 3 hours ago
 
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IS THERE ANY ORGANIZATION HELPING PEOPLE WHO ARE STRANDED DUE TO CORONAVIRUS?

I JUST FOUND OUT THAT WE (MY WIFE INCLUDED) CAN'T GO BACK TO THE CITY I WORK IN, MIGHT NOT EVEN BE ABLE TO GET BACK TO CHINA. 

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24 weeks 2 min ago
 
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A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs
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