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Q: Will this Chinese "princess" go to jail in the US?

https://nypost.com/2018/12/22/how-arrest-of-chinese-princess-exposes-reg...

 

I sure hope so. No Chinese food in prison unless you count chop suey. Hope she likes Salisbury steak for dinner - and that's on a good night!

12 weeks 6 days ago in  General  - China

 
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Recidivism.

Did I spell that right?

Anyway, it seems strange to me why ppl wish terrible things to others in jail, before a trial even.

Compare the figures for recidivism between the US system and the Norwegian system.

Watch the Shawshank redemption.

To hope bad things happen to ppl is just wrong.

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12 weeks 5 days ago
 
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https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-21/us-arrests-chinese-national-ch...

 

 One day after the US officially declared war on Chinese "cyberwarriors", the DOJ announced late on Friday that 35-year-old Chinese national and legal permanent resident, Hongjin Tan, was arrested on Dec. 20 and charged with theft of trade secrets from his employer, an unidentified U.S. petroleum company.

 

“Hongjin Tan allegedly stole trade secrets related to a product worth more than $1 billion from his U.S.-based petroleum company employer, to use for the benefit of a Chinese company where he was offered employment,” said Assistant Attorney General Demers. “The theft of intellectual property harms American companies and American workers. As our recent cases show, all too often these thefts involve the Chinese government or Chinese companies. The Department recently launched an initiative to protect our economy from such illegal practices emanating from China, and we continue to make this a top priority.” 

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12 weeks 6 days ago
 
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Recidivism.

Did I spell that right?

Anyway, it seems strange to me why ppl wish terrible things to others in jail, before a trial even.

Compare the figures for recidivism between the US system and the Norwegian system.

Watch the Shawshank redemption.

To hope bad things happen to ppl is just wrong.

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12 weeks 5 days ago
 
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https://www.globalresearch.ca/selected-articles-next-generation-5g-and-t...

 

5G - Next Generation of Mobile Network by M. Chossudovsky

 

The unspoken US policy objective behind the arrest of  Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou on trumped up charges, consists in breaking China’s technological lead in wireless telecommunications. 

What is at stake is a coordinated US and allied intelligence initiative to ban China’s Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd from the “next generation” state of the art 5G global mobile phone network.

The intelligence operation is led by “Five Eyes”, a so-called “intelligence-sharing alliance to combat espionage” between the US and its four (junior) Anglo-Saxon partners: UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand.  

Western media tabloids repeatedly refer to legitimate “national security concerns” as a justification for the banning of China’s telecom equipment.

What is at stake is a fierce battle in the global wireless telecom industry. 

Spy Chiefs Meet Behind Closed Doors in Nova Scotia 

 

On July 17, the spy chiefs from the “Five Eyes” nations travelled from Ottawa to Nova Scotia for a meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (who was on a Nova Scotia tour including meetings with NS Premier Stephen McNeil)

 

The meeting with the “Five Eyes” spy chiefs hosted by Trudeau was held at an (unnamed) coastal resort in Nova Scotia. It was casually described by The Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) as “an informal evening after intense talks in nearby Ottawa”. Nearby?

more ... 

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12 weeks 5 days ago
 
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https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2018-05-22/deadly-chinese-fentan...

Deadly Chinese Fentanyl Is Creating a New Era of Drug KingpinsThe opioid’s potency has transformed the global trafficking — and policing — of narcotics.

Outside the gates of a residential complex called Oak Bay, a construction frenzy tears up the central Chinese city of Wuhan, a metropolis of 11 million racing to catch up with Beijing and Shanghai. The aural assault of jackhammers and cement trucks fades at the walls of the complex. Inside, a leafy oasis of manicured grounds and winding red-brick walkways draws out residents for early morning tai chi sessions near the banks of the Yangtze River.

Among the 5,000 apartments, on a high-rise’s 20th floor, lives Yan Xiaobing, a chemicals distributor with short, spiky hair. His wife, Hu Qi, operates an English tutoring business. Their social-media feed shows the couple and their two young children under blue skies at the beach and posing at landmarks in Europe and Japan. One photo shows Yan reading to pupils in a classroom.

In half-frame glasses, blue plastic house slippers and button-down shirt, Yan could have passed as an ordinary office worker when Bloomberg News reporters found him late last year. Filling the apartment doorway with his 6-foot frame, he expressed soft-spoken bafflement at the portrait the U.S. Justice Department paints of him: not a modest businessman, but a new type of international drug dealer. “This is horrifying,” he said. “Their investigation must have gone wrong.”

Federal prosecutors in Mississippi charged Yan, 41, in September with leading an empire built on the manufacture and sale of drugs related to fentanyl, one of the world’s deadliest and most profitable narcotics. So strong that it’s been studied as a chemical weapon, the drug has saturated American streets with breathtaking speed: It kills more people than any other opioid, including prescription pills and heroin, because it’s so easy to overdose. Authorities say they have linked Yan and his 9W Technology Co. to more than 100 distributors across the U.S. and at least 20 other countries. Investigators expect scores of arrests as they dismantle his alleged network.

A month after the indictment, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein held a Washington news conference to shine a spotlight on Yan and another man, Zhang Jian, 39, who’s accused of a similar scheme. Their indictments, Rosenstein told reporters, marked “a major milestone in our battle to stop deadly fentanyl from reaching the United States.” 

Yan is the first Chinese national the U.S. has ever added to its “consolidated priority organization target” list of individuals thought to command the world's most prolific drug-trafficking and money-laundering networks. Investigators say his strategy was to offer fentanyl-like compounds called analogues — which differ slightly on a molecular level but produce similar effects — in order to exploit discrepancies between the laws in the U.S. and China. Rosenstein expressed optimism that his Chinese counterparts would hold Yan accountable.

But if Yan doesn’t resemble a stereotypical drug lord, neither is fentanyl your average drug. It has upended how traffickers conduct business and how such activity gets policed. Bloomberg News examined hundreds of pages of court documents and government reports and interviewed drug dealers and law officers, retracing a byzantine path that took investigators from a Mississippi parking lot all the way to Wuhan.

What emerged looked less like the movie fantasy of guns and fancy cars and more like an operation that brokers souvenir keychains or counterfeit cosmetics. It is barely more trouble to dispatch deadly drugs than any of the other goods Americans import from the country of 1.4 billion every day. 

The Drug Enforcement Administration might have never found Yan if not for a traffic stop in Ocean Springs, Mississippi on March 20, 2013. On an overcast Gulf Coast morning, Roslyn Demetrius Chapman, then 26, turned into the parking lot of the AT&T call center where she worked. A police officer suspected the windows of her silver Mitsubishi Galant were tinted too darkly, then found her license was suspended. He arrested her, and a search of her car turned up bags of synthetic marijuana and white powder.

Gulfport police Sergeant Adam Gibbons, a native New Yorker with a hockey player’s build and buzz cut, was two towns over when he got the call. As a then-13-year veteran who split time between street patrols and investigations with a DEA task force, he had insight into the trade from top to bottom and an expertise in synthetic narcotics. He took the lead. His team searched Chapman's home and a storage unit, finding more synthetic marijuana, chemicals used to make it, U.S. Postal Service boxes, shipping labels, ledgers and receipts.

He and DEA intelligence analyst John Metcalf scoured Chapman’s phone records, Facebook account and laptop. It looked like she was in love with someone named Rasheed Ali Muhammad in Bridgeport, Connecticut, whom she’d met on the phone through a mutual friend. They’d rendezvoused in Washington and New York and he’d gifted her shoes and Godiva chocolate. She'd gotten his name tattooed on her chest.

“Im all in with u baby,” she wrote in one email, pledging to help him in “building an empire.” 

Their so-called empire was an online operation that sold synthetic drugs known as spice, bath salts and flakka that mimic marijuana and stimulants. It wasn’t some haphazard thing: They treated first-time customers to free samples and free shipping, took credit cards and PayPal, and provided next-day delivery, tracking numbers and 100-percent money-back guarantees. 

But where were the fake weed and bath salts coming from? Gibbons obtained a search warrant for a Yahoo email account created by Muhammad and spotted the drugs' source: Yan Xiaobing in Wuhan.

A Sept. 14, 2011, message to Yan read: “Can I pay to have this stuff shipped faster? I need this stuff like yesterday,” referring to JWH 210, a synthetic cannabinoid. 

Using the alias William Zhou, Yan confirmed the shipment with a tracking number. “UPS is the fastest way to USA, we have tried our best to send it quickly and charge no extra fee,” he wrote. A similar compound, he wrote, “is just out of stock, the new batch will be ready tonight, so we will send it tomorrow. Since September, the purchase amount are soaring, so we will increase human power and equipment to expand the production capacity.” 

He signed it, “Best regards.” 

On Aug. 10, 2012, Yan sent Muhammad’s account a price list for 26 mind- and body-altering chemicals ranging from $1,400 to $3,600 per kilo.

(Chapman and Muhammad would later get prison sentences of nearly 17 and 120 years, respectively. In interviews, Muhammad, now 45, admitted to selling chemicals but said he did extensive research to remain within the law.)

Fentanyl wasn’t on offer, but agents kept following the digital trails that have made it easier for people like Muhammad and Yan to enter the global drug trade and for investigators to hunt them down. Because Yan used Gmail, operated by U.S.-based Google, Gibbons and his team could persuade a judge to let them monitor his communications in real time. What they found broke the dam: Yan wasn’t just selling fake weed and bath salts to Muhammad in Connecticut. Gibbons said he was peddling fentanyl analogues around the globe. 

“This guy has hooks all over the place,” Gibbons recalled thinking as he traveled to New Orleans; Baltimore; Portsmouth, New Hampshire and dozens of other cities to track down buyers. Metcalf, the intelligence analyst, worked the international angle, alerting his counterparts about customers in Russia, Kuwait, Sweden, Brazil and 16 other countries. They went undercover as distributors, prompting Yan to send them seven shipments containing kilograms of fentanyl analogues and other synthetics. Yan labeled the packages as clothing, buttons, radios and cleaning supplies, and when Gibbons claimed that one had been confiscated by customs, Yan sent another for free.  

By the time of the indictment, investigators had tied Yan to at least two Chinese factories equipped to produce deadly chemical compounds by the ton. The indictment charges Yan with conspiring to manufacture and import 22 substances banned in the U.S. over six years beginning in 2010. Included on the list are four fentanyl analogues — none of which were illegal in China at the times he’s accused of sending them to Mississippi.

That wasn’t by accident, Gibbons said. “He stayed abreast of the law to stay ahead of it.” 

While the blossoming of fentanyl as an internet-era plague is new, the drug itself isn’t.

Paul Janssen, the physician-founder of Janssen Pharmaceutica, now a unit of Johnson & Johnson, synthesized it in a Belgian laboratory in 1960. It is the world’s strongest opioid approved for human medical use, soothing the most excruciating pain and helping to put surgical patients to sleep.

For years, fentanyl-related overdose deaths never exceeded a few thousand. Then, in 2014, the drugs killed more than 5,000 people. By September 2017, they accounted for more than 26,000 deaths, half the opioid total. One of the seeds of demand had been sown in the 1990s, when doctors began overprescribing legal painkillers like OxyContin. Abusers eventually turned to their stronger cousin, heroin. That in turn created an opening for dealers to offer fentanyl. 

The drug is potent almost beyond comprehension — and that’s what changes the game. It’s prescribed by the millionth of a gram. Two milligrams, the equivalent of seven poppy seeds, can kill. It’s often crudely diluted, which makes it difficult for illicit users to determine how much they’re consuming. 

The drug’s rise has coincided with that of the dark web, encrypted messaging apps and cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, all of which help manufacturers remain anonymous. They can transport hundreds of thousands of doses via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx — slipping past law officers accustomed to tracing narcotics by the truckload.

 

 

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12 weeks 5 days ago
 
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Wow the OP is on top of current events

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The western press of course was making a big deal of the 3rd Canadian. She is home now. Done her administritive detention for being an illegal teacher. Now she is home, not saying a word.

Will she go on Fox or Oprah to say how she is a victim of the terrible commies?

In my view, Fox or CNN could pick this up and tell ppl not to try to work illegally in other countries. They could explain the scam jobs that say its ok to work on a tourist visa.

Will they?

Of course not.

Because even with a teacher working illegally in China, who is caught and thrown out..the story has to be bad China.

Getting back to the first 2. If I was an ice hockey promoter, what visa should I apply for?

Everyone who posts here knows what is involved in getting a legal work permit etc. Its the bane of our lifes.

If you were an NGO agent or an Ice hockey promotor, how on earth would you apply for that?

Western MSM seems to be forgetting to research that. Or maybe they saw these pages, and decided not to report it?

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11 weeks 5 days ago
 
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