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Q: Anyone else have a lot of respect for Xi Jinping?

Yeah, yeah. I've heard it all. Everyone's saying he's just trying to consolidate power. Yet, he's going after corrupt officials who have already fled abroad. Even the United States has signed an agreement to give them data on corrupt officials, and help return them to China for punishment.

 

Fact of the matter is, he seems to be doing a really good job in cleaning up China, both tigers and flies. He seems to genuinely care about the common person as well.

 

Maybe I'm wrong, but I think he's doing a great job at cleaning up a big mess.

7 years 18 weeks ago in  Arts & Entertainment - Beijing

 
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Why is this in Arts & Entertainment??

 

Oh, yeah, got it! Tongue

 

No, I don't (have respect for Xi).

 

He's just another guy at the top, trying to use his power to control whatever he can, and fatten his bank accounts. Xi is just as corrupt - or vastly more so - than any of the other fat pigs he's apparently been chasing.

 

When he met with his nation's biggest 'antagonist' for 'talks', he publicly snubbed him in front of a whole host of media - surely the work of a peasant mentality and completely idiotic in world politics. The BS in the East China Sea invading the territorial waters of sovereign nations - again, stupid, and merely a demonstration of his inadequacy as a world leader.

 

What has actually changed in the lives of the ordinary people - the one's he's charged with protecting and improving? Well, basically nothing... and that's not going to change either.

 

Xi's comment mentioned above about democracy... of course he'll never consider democracy - he'd lose all his power. It has nothing to do with any 'effective' versions - it's all about control. Democracy - of the many types around the world - can and does work.And, what's his definition of 'effective'? Obviously - who gets to control everything?  (I'm not saying democracy is the best system, however I do think that the people at the bottom, whose lives are most affected by the decisions at the top, ought to have a say in what happens to them. Certainly, the guys at the top shouldn't be treating them as their own personal slave store they way they have been here).

Shining_brow:

Oh, I forgot to mention... "the west is bad, we should all keep our kids here in China where it is good"... but then sending your daughter to Harvard University.... yeah, no respect!

7 years 18 weeks ago
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Nope. Not much respect for him or his party. Although, I will give him props for the wonderful game of "smoke and mirrors" he plays. And, he would fit right in with any American politician the way he says one thing to fool the people and does another.

When President Xi came into power, I was curious to know if he was another wolf in sheep's clothing. It turns out that he is. But, you really can't blame him entirely. He is nothing more than a product of his Communist beliefs and his culture. And, he is trying so hard to make himself into the next Chinese God for the 21st century (mao), that he has lost sight of what his original intent for China was. If Presidedent Xi gets his way, b ythe end of his term, he will do to China, what Putin has done to Russia. Both are using similar playbooks to achieve their ego stroking, legacy building agendas.

He could have been a great 21st century leader and bring China into the world as a great superpower and leader of the world. But, his current actions, which have been tried before in history, is destined to fail. The reason for the failure...Communist and Socialist theology. No country has proven the stability of such a system to advance and prosper their nations under such systems. Governments do not make a prosperous and successful nation. It is the people of the nation that do it. And, they do it through, among other things, free thinking, creative thinking, initiative, and critical thinking. All of which the Chinese government fears in giving to their citizens.

President Xi responded to a question last year that I originally thought was smart. But, under reflection, I realized how truly wrong he was. He was asked why China does not try a form of Democracy in China. His answer was that they have looked at various models of democracy in the world and have not found a successful model that has worked in the world. At first I thought he was correct. Even America has faultered in that great democracy experiment in the past. But, then I realized that through democracy systems, places like Japan, Thailand, and even the COUNTRY of Taiwan, has prospered and advanced themselves under such systems. It does not have to be a USA, UK, Canada, or Australian based model. But, a similar model could and would work, in time, in China.

So, long story short...NO. I do not think President Xi deserves respect yet for his accomplishments as a great leader in China. Maybe one day I can change that answer.

Shining_brow:

I'm glad you made  the comparison to Putin, though I'm not so much against P as I am against X. Putin is somewhat more interested in public opinion than Xi - which is a good sign.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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xinyuren:

Your definition of prosperity is very different from mine.  Advancement too.  Japan, Thailand and Taiwan all suffer from serious problems as a result of their governments.  I wouldn't hold them up as shining examples.  In fact, there isn't a single government that is an example of prosperity.  It's just a matter of which flavor of domination you prefer to have.  Given time, every government goes thru the same phases of hope, rejuvenation, stagnancy, and finally decline.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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Xi is just helping us understand how efficient the Coué method can be. Take over the media, impose optimistic autosuggestion, hammer, hammer, hammer, hammer. There's no lie too big for it.

 

For a long time I have been wondering whether this anti-corruption graft was either for show, out of genuine care or simply for replacing the seats with loyals. Either way it was indeed all doomed to fail.

 

Given what I have seen on the ground, given the good glimpse I could have at the replacement personnel, I can say with enough confidence that the answer is the last one. The central government doesn't give a damn about corruption, and I don't think at any point did they ever hope that China could be ridden of corruption.

Apart from the fact that the CCP would evaporate in thin air should this be actually fought with success, there is one simple fact:

Greed leads to corruption, and greed is hard coded in this society, to the extent that it's a constant in their history. A history that's been turning in circles for the best part of the last thousands of years it claims to have. It's who they are, it's what they do. They burn fake money for their deceased elders to use. What would you expect from people who think of money as a transcendental extension of the human being. Corruption is just a symptom, and you can only trick the body into thinking it's better for so long when you only treat symptoms.

 

The new president is looking at giving the longest longevity to the oligarchy it leads. Which means #1 setting up clear barriers so the peons can't look away, #2 making sure the personnel is in check, loyal and well within aforementioned barriers, #3 keeping the fantasy running and the stability intact at any cost, as contradictory as it sounds.

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Why is this in Arts & Entertainment??

 

Oh, yeah, got it! Tongue

 

No, I don't (have respect for Xi).

 

He's just another guy at the top, trying to use his power to control whatever he can, and fatten his bank accounts. Xi is just as corrupt - or vastly more so - than any of the other fat pigs he's apparently been chasing.

 

When he met with his nation's biggest 'antagonist' for 'talks', he publicly snubbed him in front of a whole host of media - surely the work of a peasant mentality and completely idiotic in world politics. The BS in the East China Sea invading the territorial waters of sovereign nations - again, stupid, and merely a demonstration of his inadequacy as a world leader.

 

What has actually changed in the lives of the ordinary people - the one's he's charged with protecting and improving? Well, basically nothing... and that's not going to change either.

 

Xi's comment mentioned above about democracy... of course he'll never consider democracy - he'd lose all his power. It has nothing to do with any 'effective' versions - it's all about control. Democracy - of the many types around the world - can and does work.And, what's his definition of 'effective'? Obviously - who gets to control everything?  (I'm not saying democracy is the best system, however I do think that the people at the bottom, whose lives are most affected by the decisions at the top, ought to have a say in what happens to them. Certainly, the guys at the top shouldn't be treating them as their own personal slave store they way they have been here).

Shining_brow:

Oh, I forgot to mention... "the west is bad, we should all keep our kids here in China where it is good"... but then sending your daughter to Harvard University.... yeah, no respect!

7 years 18 weeks ago
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No.  Not one bit.

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It seems like they must be losing control if they "ban" western TV shows and western thought in schools. It's even worse in Beijing. But then again, if they lose Beijing they lose the whole country.

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He certainly is better that other leaders China has had. Respect, no. Has the guy ever actually done anything or did all his power just drop onto his lap because his parents happened to be near the power. 

 

Does he have the respect of the people. Probably not. In China the people don't respect the government, they fear it. 

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China has certainly seen worse leaders than Xi.  For those who say he doesn't really care about corruption,  you are wrong.  Corruption is the enemy of all forms of government and China's corruption is at epic levels.  Xi wisely sees that corruption could very well lead to the fall of the party.  I think he's serious about it.  But let's be honest, he's trying to kill two birds with one stone.  First and foremost, he's wants to secure his position as head of CCP, military, and head of State.  While I don't agree with his ideology, I respect his office and I feel he is doing a competent job, considering his goals.

 

Democracy works?  Who thinks that?  Please define "works".  In my opinion, it doesn't work any more than Communism or Socialism.  For a moment, adjust your world view and pretend that the majority of governments were communist and democracy was the minority - the opposite of reality.  Most likely we would all be demonizing "wicked" democratic values. Communism's black eye is largely the result of being in the  minority. But if you define "works" as running smoothly, then you won't find a single government that meets that criteria.  If your definition is more liberal, Xi's form of government also works.  It definitely appears he has a clear plan and he has the fortitude and means to carry it out.  Whether or not he will meet success is another matter altogether.

RiriRiri:

He's serious about looking serious about it. Period.

 

Sorry, I have seen first hand how this is playing on the ground, and the conclusion is that the replacement personnel globally is much, much worse than those taken out of office.

There will be no rise in morals and values, trust me.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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xinyuren:

He has made some tangible changes in domestic policy designed specifically to deal with corruption.  These changes have started to affect government officials' public conduct to some degree.  Of course they will never get rid of corruption.  Nobody does. The west has rampant legalized corruption. Corruption is a product of moral failing and you can't legislate morality. But he is making a creditable attempt to stem the tide, even if it's only for self interests.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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nashboroguy:

Xinyuren...have you ever read the Little Red Book about Mao? Even Chairman Mao wanted democracy. He saw China as a Democracy one day. He was trying to work towards that goal. Unfortunately, he thought the path to democracy was first through Communism. Once Communism got the people prepared and educated about democracy, Communism would be disolved and Democracy would take over. You should read the Little Red Book sometime. Very interesting and shocking at some of the thoughts Mao had. Granted, Mao was a murderous nut in the end. He definitely did not like western cultures. And, the similarities of what the CCP is doing now and what Mao proposed in the book are very nearly identical. If you see the countries that Mao wanted to align himself with and the countries China is aligning themselves with today...it is nerly the same.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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xinyuren:

No, I haven't read the book.  I am not that interested in politics, but i have no reason to doubt what you say.  Unfortunately Democracy, in practice, is hampered by human failings to the same extent as other doctrines.  In the end, we can't run away from ourselves.

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ScotsAlan:

Yup. What Xin says. No perfect system, but we all think our system is best... well..no system is best. They are al flawed.

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Shining_brow:

Firstly - Democracy is a system of electing a government, while Communism is a socio-economic system regarding wealth and means (control) of production. Apple and orange! It's quite (and possibly ideal) to have a democratic communist nation. The 'opposite' to democracy would be dictatorship, or oligarchy, or monarchy. In my view, it's clearly a dictatorial oligarchy - total control by an upper-class elite (which was empowered through a military revolution/civil war). According to Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China#Communist_Party), "China supports the Leninist principle of "democratic centralism",[155] but the elected National People's Congress has been described as a "rubber stamp" body.[156] As a single-party state, the General Secretary of the Communist Party of China holds ultimate power and authority over state and government.[m

 

Communism, however, is a socio-economic theory, and it's opposite would be Capitalism, where the means of production and wealth distribution are (in extreme) completely controlled by market forces. Socialism, practiced to a greater or lesser degree in most countries, is in between, with the state holding/controlling many aspects of 'production' and 'wealth' (eg, capital works projects, welfare, etc). The USA is, at least slightly, Socialist (as is France, Sweden, Australia, NZ, UK,  etc etc).

 

Confusing these two completely different ideologies and systems really gets my goat!

 

In regards to this particular question - Xi has no intention of ever letting go of the power - he has no interest in having democratic elections, in which the government is controlled by the people through a voting system. However, he does like a version of Communism, where the 'state' controls the major aspects of social cohesion (eg, electricity, QA of goods, etc), purely because that's where the richest parts of the corruption come from.

 

Does democracy 'work'? Obviously! You'd have to be completely ignorant to say it doesn't! There are so many countries, and so many centuries (going back a couple of thousand years, at least) of it working. If it didn't 'work', then the governments and countries would have fallen apart from internal problems (rather than external invaders, etc). Dictatorships also 'work' too - for a time. So do monarchies. Perhaps coincidentally, it's been pretty rare to see a democracy change back to some other form of government, whereas the others all seem to end up as democracies. Perhaps not surprising - the mass of people all want some say about their life!

7 years 18 weeks ago
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xinyuren:

@shining.  So obviously your definition of "works" is liberal and as I have stated, by liberal standards, Xi's governance also "works".   My first car was a 1973 Ford Maverick (bought it in 1985).  It was a beater, but it "worked".  My last car was a 2005 Cadillac CTS-V.  That also worked.  There isn't a government in the world that runs like a Cadillac.  Most of them work like my old Ford, including democracies. They all have their limited lifespans.   My personal definition of "works" is a bit more strict than yours and I have just as many complaints about the government in America as I do about the CCP.  They both fail to satisfy the needs of the majority.

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The "clean-up" : since pretty much all officials of any level are corrupt, it's easy to push them out on corruption charge. Exactly like Judge Dredd : police, judge, jury, executioner rolled into one, and don't you dare question his almighty judgement ("it's our culture", "China is different"). Sounds more like a purge to me, since the investigation process is completely opaque.

Does he care about the country ? Yes. But so far, it's more about the oligarchy than the commoner. Son of the oligarchy (I mean, look who his Dad is...), servant of the oligarchy. The cleaning going on is more about ensuring the oligarchy have a future, rather than the well-being of the commoner. "But it's like this in the West too" : depends on the country, and you have to look into the details to see major difference in quality and quantity.

Respect ? When there are lots of talks about curbing foreign influences and encourage local innovation... but sending his daughter studying to Harvard and sending to jail home-grown civil right activist, nope, no respect.

RiriRiri:

Have you ever felt that strange sensation, after you have repeated a word so many times you eventually forget what it means?

That's exactly how innovation feels to me when I read the news lately. CCP-Chinese is a very, very, very repetitive language.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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DrMonkey:

@RiriRiri The dilution of meaning through repetition and crafted language is mentioned and discussed in the book 1984 :)

7 years 18 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

Riri-riri & DrM - you just made me think of something... (whic I'll create a question out of).. is China the land of the 1984 "double-think"? Knowing a word/phrase has two, completely contradictory meanings, and being able to use it (the word/phrase) effectively employing both meanings at the same time?

7 years 18 weeks ago
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DrMonkey:

@Shining_Brown Yes. Note that Orwell took the inspiration for his book from Stalin's era USSR, which itself served as inspiration to the CCP.

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Governor

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some copying and pasting

 

“Why must we stand firm on the Party’s leadership over the military?” Xi continued, “because that’s the lesson from the collapse of the Soviet Union. In the Soviet Union where the military was depoliticized, separated from the Party and nationalized, the party was disarmed. A few people tried to save the Soviet Union; they seized Gorbachev, but within days it was turned around again, because they didn’t have the instruments to exert power. Yeltsin gave a speech standing on a tank, but the military made no response, keeping so-called ‘neutrality.’ Finally, Gorbachev announced the disbandment of the Soviet Communist Party in a blithe statement. A big Party was gone just like that. Proportionally, the Soviet Communist Party had more members than we do,but nobody was man enough to stand up and resist.”

[…] Xi Jinping didn’t mention “political reform” in the new southern tour speech. In fact, he has not made any reference to it since after the 18th Party’s Congress. Instead, in his southern tour speech, he laid out his ideological bedrocks: “Only socialism can save China. Only (economic) reform and opening-up can develop China, develop socialism, and develop Marxism. 

This was from 2 years ago.

Also reading on how Xi is an adherent of Legalism.  Which is very autocratic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legalism_(Chinese_philosophy)

 

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simply put.... yes.... I have respect for what he is doing.

the system and the society is not going to change overnight. I believe he is on the right track.

get rid of the "bad apples" for starters. train some new ones (hope he is doing that).

Putin, as far as I can see and believe "mostly from western media", has just gone backwards ... does he have a trainee that is not from the "good old days"?

 

the people here, Chinese people, would not know how to "vote" ...  who to vote for or why........  

for now, a strong leader is required and I think Xi Jinping is being that strong leader.. spread the wealth dammit.

not gonna happen overnight!!!

xinyuren:

It may interest you that Xi isn't grooming his replacement as has been the custom of past Chairmen.  Many people believe it is because he doesn't plan to relinquish power after his 10 year term.  Could this mark the return of the Emperors (rhetorical question)?

7 years 18 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

I would suggest that Putin's low popularity in 'the west' is due to media propaganda. At home, in Russia, he's very popular with the majority of the people (perhaps not as high as the ratings suggest, but he is still far more popular with his 'voters' than any other political leader in the world today (well, maybe Castro and Kim... :p).

 

His negative stereotyping mostly comes from his stances against the US and EU (which, really, haven't been as bad as suggested...). "The west" (ie, US) has acted quite aggressively towards Russia for some time, so when he then looks after Russia's interests first, he's seen as a demon.

 

Xi, admittedly, is doing similar - but Xi doesn't give a rat's arse about the people - only about his own power and prestige.

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In the world, a new age has come..... nobody is reacting fast enough to it...or is prepared for it ....  it is a GLOBAL WORLD ......   nobody could have or should have expected the unbelievable speed at which technology has taken over. 

Obama (USA) and Jinping (China) have a handle on it...I believe ....  it is a world that needs to smarten up or destroy itself ..at least the human part of it.  ...  others of course know this too, but they are the 2 big guns. .....  

everybody I know here, educated or not, has access to a smartphone and more information than they ever, ever could have had just 10 years ago.....small town China.

India's democracy could show some light to the Chinese and the billions of people involved in this region .....

 

BHGAL:

my wife is a perfect example ... little education (no university)... she only knows about her neighborhood ....  until the past 5-6 years....now she is so full of questions and comments about world things  ..  gets news on her smart phone... watches  satellite TV...she knows the weather in my home town. I know the streets of this town better than she does...  just her neighborhood before I got here.  LITTLE THINGS .. small steps.

7 years 18 weeks ago
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Shining_brow:

I will disagree with you on one point - who you think are doing things right.

 

Obama, Xi, Merkel, Abbott, Cameron, etc etc etc... they are all, somewhere, controlled and controlling..

 

Yes, the world could change hugely... but those 'at the top' have no great interest in making it the best global world it could be - but only in keeping it as much in the status quo as possible.

 

We - humanity all across the world - should have had free electricity, clean drinking water, ample food, sufficient housing for decades. Certainly, the last 20 years has had more than adequate technology for all of these things, There should never be wars over oil.

 

"New figures from the the Worldwatch Institute indicate that by 2014 there will be more cell phone plans than actual people. That’s right: the number of mobile subscriptions- that is, the number of active accounts that have access to a mobile network- far surpasses the number of phone owners, and the number is expected to hit 6.8 billion by the end of 2013." (http://betakit.com/number-of-cell-phone-plans-expected-to-surpass-worlds-population-in-early-2014/ - my emphasis).

 

We (humanity - and in particular, the controllers) destroy the planet in ridiculous ways, while people die in solvable ways... when, with any real consciousness and forethought, we'd be saving the planet, doing this that are effective and long-lasting, and the people would have safe, secure, long and healthy lives....

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Very easy to confuse fear and respect in Mainland China these days............

coineineagh:

The perfect answer. Up next: Watch more adults switch off their brain, squint happy eyes and sing along to children's cartoons of jolly unkie Xi and cheerful Mao. With flag-waving, cutesy semi-automatic weapons and Big Big Wolf enemies to shoot at. Happy Happy Joy Joy. Xi so good. Japan so bad. Can I get my 50ct. please?

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I have more respect for Xi than I do for the 47 Republican traitors who seem to the the only way forward is to go to war.

rasklnik:

I have little respect for people who think mao hats and red stars are any more acceptable than wearing sheets or double lightning bolts.

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in my home town.....  I do not believe there is fear of progress or fear of Beijing..... what I see is a glimpse of opportunity.....people  do have a belief that  things are getting better....even those that bought houses last year or 2 years ago....  overpaid for their homes......but what the hey, shit happens ........I overpaid for mine back home too. (twice).

no fear.

the respect part is kind of indifferent..... prove it "prick"  make my life better.  ... and of course that is not going to happen in an instant....  time will tell.

I do respect "him" ..... the locals have been burnt more than once.... prove it.

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Shifu

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YOU SHALL RESPECT MA AUTHORITA!

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Who is Xi Jinping? 

DrMonkey:

A guy who likes eating bao zi in the street and tour the country, bringing blue skies on his trail.

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Ideology is a specious way of relating to the world. It offers human beings the illusion of an identity, of dignity, and of morality while making it easier for them to part with them. As the repository of something suprapersonal and objective, it enables people to deceive their conscience and conceal their true position and their inglorious modus vivendi, both from the world and from themselves. It is a very pragmatic but, at the same time, an apparently dignified way of legitimizing what is above, below, and on either side. It is directed toward people and toward God. It is a veil behind which human beings can hide their own fallen existence, their trivialization, and their adaptation to the status quo. It is an excuse that everyone can use, from the greengrocer, who conceals his fear of losing his job behind an alleged interest in the unification of the workers of the world, to the highest functionary, whose interest in staying in power can be cloaked in phrases about service to the working class. The primary excusatory function of ideology, therefore, is to provide people, both as victims and pillars of the post-totalitarian system, with the illusion that the system is in harmony with the human order and the order of the universe. . . . Vaclav Havel

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A: Teaching English in China Requirements for 2022 (chinabyteaching.com)&
A:Teaching English in China Requirements for 2022 (chinabyteaching.com) This link will answer your visa questions. There is NOT a requirement for two years experience to be a teacher in China.  If you come with your husband under a different visa, make sure you have all the required documentation to get a Z visa when you find a job in China. It will make your life much easier.  To work in China, you MUST have a Z visa and only a Z visa.  -- nashboroguy