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Q: Are Associate's degrees acceptable when looking for a long term job as an English teacher in China?

I am currently attending a community college in the U.S. and plan to move to China spring 2014 to teach English in Beijing. I am currently building my resume and will be applying to job offers soon. I will have my Associate's degree by the end of this year, so when applying for jobs in China, should I say that I already have an Associate's Degree or that I WILL have one by next spring? Also, I am a bit concerned by the fact that many jobs seem to require a Bachelor's degree as minimum requirement. Will an Associate's degree be sufficient? I know many job postings only say "degree required". I have looked at some interesting jobs that either say nothing about a degree or specifically say "no experience required" or "no degree required".
Also, is getting TEFL certified worth it if they don't require it and have a training program?
THANK YOU.

7 years 10 weeks ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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Posts: 2418

Emperor

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In any country other than China, a BA & TEFL would be 95% required.  However, this is China.  There are lots of people here teaching without a degree or TEFL certificate.  The schools are known to simply make up or forge anything that is required to put a white face in front of students.

 

The laws have been more enforced over the last few years, but still lots of shady stuff going on.  Best advice I can give is: "Proceed at your own risk."

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
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Emperor

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You can easily find a school that is willing to hire you without the required degree and TESOL certificate. However, bear in mind that this means the school and you are both cheating the government.

 

If a school is willing to cheat the government, it will have no qualms about cheating you. Because you are cheating the government, you cannot then expect the government (or anybody) to help you because you are being cheated.

 

The requirement is a bachelor degree (not associate degree) and a TESOL/TEFL certificate. You must also be a native speaker. If you take a job without meeting these requirements, you should not complain later if you meet difficulties.

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
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Yang Luxin, professor at Beijing Foreign Studies University and researcher at China’s Foreign Languages Research Center, said “Despite 300 million Chinese studying English, only a minority can speak English very well. Chinese students spend a lot of time studying – not just a few hours a week, but a lot more, but the problem is the teaching methods of the teachers and their proficiency in English“.

Read more: http://www.economicvoice.com/use-of-english-language-to-increase-in-china/50016957#ixzz2JEhibfKt

 

Do you really think China can 'afford' 'ONLY English Native Teachers Law' with this number of students?

 

At the moment, I am working for 3 different Schools, with 2 private students in my 'free time', in total of a bit more than 30 hours per week. I hold valid Residence permit and FEC, as Non-native English teacher. And, I don't cringe at anybody.

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
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Enmasse - when you say 'long term', do you mean as a career? Or just a couple of years??

 

But, to answer your question - legally, no, an Associate's degree does not meet the requirements as set down by the Chinese government. Also, legally you need at least 2 years work experience. (and, if I can find the right link... I'm sure you also need a TEFL certificate...not sure if there's a requirement on how good it needs to be or not...). I'm also sure I read that you do need to be a native speaker of the language you are teaching.

 

As per a similar thread, while I don't think being a native speaker ought to be a requirement, certainly there needs to be a standard of English that is met, and a standard set by English speaking countries - not China! There are a few countries around that officially 'control' their native language (France and China, just to name 2). Not a bad idea!!! Too many teachers here are teaching stuff they really don't know too well....

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
Posts: 205

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Yes in order to teach English legally in China you'll need a Bachelor's degree.  Like has been mentioned above, its possible to find work without it but if you are really interested in doing it long term you'd better finish your Bachelor's before coming.  As more and more foreigners come from struggling economies the requirements to teach will probably only grow. 

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
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