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Q: Changes in English Teaching curriculum at Universities - Good or Bad?

I am not sure if any of you heard about this but apparently the university I work at in Shanghai as a foreign teacher of English, the university told me and rest of my colleagues, "from September 2020 onwards, the university has decided to announce that all foreign teachers will only be teaching Speaking component, not the Listening component to go with Speaking component while the Chinese teachers of English faculty will be teaching Listening component". Has this happened at other universities in other parts of China or is it the only university I work at that decided to change the curriculum? 

3 weeks 4 days ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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One would assume you are paid to do as the school's management wishes you to do provided it is within the terms and conditions of the contract.

Let's not forget, you are paid to teach English as the school requires. You are not paid to think, as it were.

The choice remains: just get on with it or find a new job where they will do whatever the teachers want to keep them happy.

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3 weeks 3 days ago
 
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I have not heard this, but I have always found that teaching English by Chinese teachers is often lacking due to the quality of the Chinese teacher's own lack of proficient English. A good example of this is extra "Ah" that is put on the end of words, such as "dog-ah" or "east-ah". Many Chinese teachers do not command the precide knowledge of English, and they try to teach grammar that winds up being incorrect. As for listening skills, playing rehearsed and programmed audio segments has some usefulness, but listening requires much more. 

 

It is China, and if they think they know best, then so be it. 

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3 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Haven't heard a word of it in Nanjing. 

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3 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Of course ... It's a money saving pitch.

 

Chinese English teacher will listen to the tape without losing a face by observing in person to the live native English teacher's lesson and learn a thing or two ... 

 

It will also save an embarrassment of Chinese teacher to conduct real English speaking lesson filled with all Chinese language add ons.

 

Real solution which would bear a results would be:

 

"Hire native English speakers to teach Chinese teachers speaking of the proper, non-accented English same as it's done in other countries around the world."

Also, send Chinese English teachers abroad to get proper rhyme of the real spoken English language.

 

Stick yer face culture, where sun doesn't shine. 

 

 

European non-native English teachers speak properly accented English and they can teach it, too.

 

Bonus:

http://journals.euser.org/files/articles/ejls_jan_apr_15/Lorena_Manaj.pdf

 

 The Importance of Four Skills Reading, Speaking, Writing, Listening in a Lesson Hour

... in 3-pages .pdf file.

 

You don't need to go much further than the read of the .pdf's title. IMO.

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3 weeks 3 days ago
 
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One would assume you are paid to do as the school's management wishes you to do provided it is within the terms and conditions of the contract.

Let's not forget, you are paid to teach English as the school requires. You are not paid to think, as it were.

The choice remains: just get on with it or find a new job where they will do whatever the teachers want to keep them happy.

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3 weeks 3 days ago
 
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A: If you earned a Master's Degree in English Literature or a related sub
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