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Q: Common practice for agencies to take a cut of salary?

Is it common practice for them to take cut of salary, on top of "finder's fee"?

Any worst offenders in the industry?  

11 weeks 15 hours ago in  General  - China

 
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Of course. How do you think they make money? They should never be asking you for money, so the hiring school does the paying. ESL teaching is a business from start to finish. We teachers are merely the equipment that keeps the business operating. Although we are treated much better than Black slaves all those centuries ago, we are still property to these schools and companies. 

 

That being said, we have all the power at the beginning of the negotiations. Insist on all the things that are important to you. Compromise on the lesser things. Make sure everything is in the contract that you negotiated for. Once the contract is signed, you become their property for that contracted period, unless you do a "runner". The recruiter is not working for you since you are not paying them. They are trying to get butts in the teacher's chairs of the schools. 

 

I am not sure how prevalent the scams are nowdays, as I have been with my employer for over 6 years, but I would never send my documentation to a recruiter or employer without some adjustments. I always blacked out the important details so that they could not sell my information on the "black market". I only provided clean documents in person as I was signing the contract. That never seemed to be a problem with serious schools looking for teachers.

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10 weeks 4 days ago
 
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Never use agents unless absolutely necessary. 

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11 weeks 3 hours ago
 
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Of course. How do you think they make money? They should never be asking you for money, so the hiring school does the paying. ESL teaching is a business from start to finish. We teachers are merely the equipment that keeps the business operating. Although we are treated much better than Black slaves all those centuries ago, we are still property to these schools and companies. 

 

That being said, we have all the power at the beginning of the negotiations. Insist on all the things that are important to you. Compromise on the lesser things. Make sure everything is in the contract that you negotiated for. Once the contract is signed, you become their property for that contracted period, unless you do a "runner". The recruiter is not working for you since you are not paying them. They are trying to get butts in the teacher's chairs of the schools. 

 

I am not sure how prevalent the scams are nowdays, as I have been with my employer for over 6 years, but I would never send my documentation to a recruiter or employer without some adjustments. I always blacked out the important details so that they could not sell my information on the "black market". I only provided clean documents in person as I was signing the contract. That never seemed to be a problem with serious schools looking for teachers.

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10 weeks 4 days ago
 
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They should not be taking a cut of the salary. If this job was legitimate then the employer would be paying the finders fee in addition to the salary and that's assuming they are honest to the person or company that referred. The problem in this specific type of recruitment industry is that many of the people and companies do not have exlusive agreements with the schools that are hiring, so often they refer candidates that are not accepted and the positon is filled with someone that another entity referred. Then they are not paid. The employer may also just choose not to pay. If there is no agreement and nothing official then this could happen. It also depends on the details - usually the referring company is not paid when you sign the contract but after a certain period of time during your employment. The employer may find you unsatisfactory in that time.

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10 weeks 1 day ago
 
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A:I'd say no, you don't need working permit to work for Chinese Co. remotely, i.e. by not residing in China.Best advice on that you'll get from your employer. https://www.china-briefing.com/news/china-foreigners-work-permit-application-and-renewal-recent-changes/ See this part: However, because a valid resident permit is one of the primary requirements for the renewal of a work permit, without a valid residence permit, expatriates stranded outside China may not be able to renew their work permits anymore. ... or in other words, if you don't reside in China, work permit is also not required. Some more details about Work visa requirements .. https://www.hongdaservice.com/blog/china-work-visa-requirements-what-you-may-not-know -- icnif77