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Q: Do American-bought electronics work in China?

Is the voltage different for gadgets like ipads or is it no problem?

8 years 41 weeks ago in  Web & Technology - China

 
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You must check the transformer on the charger.  If it says 240/120 volts input, they will work.  If said 120 volts you will be out of luck. 

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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You can use American bought electronics. The ipad comes from the same company it would be the same thing. The only difference sometimes is they have things in the chinese language if you buy products in China sometimes. They will work just fine!

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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the issue is not if its the same company or not. Its the voltage it uses, I believe (i could be wrong) that china uses 240v (the same as mostly everywhere else) however USA uses 140v. Some consumer electronics can uses both voltages such as apple products, i think they have an inbuilt converter. Other products may have a swith to flip betwen voltages. Some however just dont work, such as the old xbox which i bought in the states and then found out was not compatible with the UK 240v in a big cloud od smoke.
You can buy a converter but beware it has to actually be voltage converter, not just a plug socket converter.

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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Let me see if I can explain it to you in easy to understand words.  The problem is with the charger, not with the machine itself.  Once the electrical power enters your machine, it is changed just after it enters from whatever voltage (220 or 110 volts) AC to most probably 12 volts DC (some use 9, or 6 DC). 

Again, look at your charger label.  If it says input voltage 240/120 volts you have no problem.

If it says 110 or 120 volts, you will need a small transformer or rectifier to change the 220 volts input available here to 110 volts AC for the charger of your electronic machine.  Be aware, it is not a plug adapter what you will need, it is a rectifier, transformer or converter.  Only consideration will be the wattage needed.  I have a couple rated at 5,000 watts, bought them at radio Shack back home for $ 30 US d each.  They handle computers, samll appliances, etc without a problem.  The cycles (here 50, your machine 60) is no problem except if it is a clock, then it will run slower and loose time each day.  

This will take care of the electrical problem.  another thing will be if the software inside the machine will work here or not.

By the way, you plug the rectifier or transformer into the wall outlet, and plug the charger into the output side of the rectifier/transformer.

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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According to Apple Online Customer Service, an iPad bought in the states is not compatible in China as far as the 3G goes. I've also been told that the universal power converters save your electronics from the higher wattages in other countries. That being said, I've never had a problem using a converter in any country.

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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HappyExPat is quite on the mark and has given you sound advice -- check the transformer on the device.  Sometimes they can handle Chinese current, sometimes they cannot. Be prudent otherwise you can fry your device very, very quickly.

Additionally, you can purchase adapters/convertors, etc.  They are readily available at any electronic store in the major cities.

If you are out in the countryside, you can easily order one from taoabao.

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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Most modern electronic devices have built in power converters (that's that box part of the plug on say a laptop power cable) so you should be all set.  Be warned, that in some countries, the actual male/female plugs are different.  It's easy to find power strips that will fit almost anything, but actual wall sockets in China will NOT fit the standard US plug.

Not matter what, follow HappyExpat's advice and check the voltage rating before trying to plug anything in unless you like exploding electronics and/or smoke and fire.

For high end electronics, this is usually not a problem though.  iPad, laptops, etc should present no problems, but always check.  You can buy  converters in China if you need to, so I don't think that's an issue either.

Other things, like coffee makers, etc. designed for US 120V, don't bother.

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8 years 41 weeks ago
 
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