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anonymous
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Q: Do you know of interesting,live classroom games for this winter?

pls help me with some good,interesting,and lively classroom games for 9 to 12 year old

8 years 1 week ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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Emperor

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8 years 1 week ago
 
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Emperor

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give each student 5 darts, tape a bulls eye to your chest, tell them the one who hits the center wins 10,000rmb. 

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8 years 1 week ago
 
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Hangman...most students love it,

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7 years 51 weeks ago
 
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Shifu

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Heads up seven up

I guess if you want to make them learn english at the same time then you can make them practice saying a sentence before they can guess who touched them

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7 years 51 weeks ago
 
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Shifu

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Take any kind of board game you can think of (snakes and ladders was my favourite), draw it on the board, divide the classes into teams and use coloured magnets as the game pieces. If they get an answer right you roll the dice (or whatever) for their team.

That was always my most successful activity for children that age. If they get bored of one particular type of game, switch to any number of other dice-using board games.

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7 years 51 weeks ago
 
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Governor

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Agree with hangman above.  My kids go nuts for it.  I combine it with tic-tac-toe, where if the kid guesses a letter right they put up a thing for their team on the tic-tac-toe board.  You can mix up the tic-tac-toe pieces too, X's vs. O's, sun vs. moon, ice cream vs. cake, whatever you and the kids can draw.

I also play pictionary, where I choose 1 kid and write down a word in a notebook.  Secretly show them the word, and they have to draw it, while the class guesses what he's drawing.

My favorite game to play (but best for small classes) is "I'm going on a trip and I'm gonna bring" (or "I'm going to school and I'm gonna bring" or whatever.)  One kid names something to bring, the next kid names the first item and adds one, keep adding one until you can't remember them.  Make sure they say the whole sentence every time.  Also, point to the kids to help their memory (point to student 1 to name first item, student 2 for 2nd item...).  Make sure the kids know they can say silly things (i.e. "I'm going to school and I will bring grandma").  Once they understand the game, you can vary it by using the alphabet, (student 1 - an A word, 2-B and so on).

Lastly, a game I made up that works pretty well is to draw a lower case "T" on the board, with "start" on the top left and "End" on the top right (a simple chart).  Next, write "start" in the T, with the first two letters seperated on one side and the others on the other side (ST|ART).  Now, below that, keep the ST from start but have the kids think of a new word (example stand).  Now, keep the ending but change the beginning (___|ND).  I've found two letters work best, and if they're stuck do 1 letter.  Alternate between beginnings and endings.  It's a good way to practice rhyming and alliteration, which I don't think students get to do often.  I've tried to think of a way to add a point system to the game, but haven't found a good one without one team always doing starts and the other always stuck with ends.

Lets see if this works as an example:

START | END
       ST |ART
        ST|AND
       HA|ND
       HA| 

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7 years 51 weeks ago
 
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Governor

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You can play pin the nose on the snowman. Just like pin the tail on the donkey. Create a large snowman with the entire class let everyone participate. Give a kid a blindfold and let him try to pin the carrot nose on the Snowman. You can use a variety of different characters to make the game interesting, and also, so they don't get repetitive. Another variation of the game is pin the nose on the reindeer. You can make two different color noses one red one black.  Spin the kid around 3-5 times so they are a bit dizzy and point them in the direction of the reindeer about 2 to 3 feet in front of it. Tell them to walk forward and place the nose on the reindeer. The closest to the reindeer nose wins!

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7 years 50 weeks ago
 
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General

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One of my most successful games is a tic-tac-toe variation. First I draw the tic-tac-toe grid and then I put a different definition in each one of the nine spaces. Then I write the corresponding words on small pieces of paper and mix them up in a bag. (For example, in the spaces on the grid I will write "nineteen," "ninety," "seventy-one," etc., and then on the pieces of paper, "19," "90," and "71.") Each team takes turns picking a piece of paper out the bag, and then they have to find the corresponding spot on the board. Therefore in this variation, they don't have a choice as to where they put their 'x' or 'o,' they have to find the correct place already on the board. This game is good for many ages and levels, and is especially useful when the many ages and levels are all in one class together, since it's primarily a luck-of-the-draw game.

 

Another fun game is "I Spy." I usually tell them that the game is "I See" since that's easier to explain. And you can change it up. For learning colors: "I see something purple." For general practice: "I see something that begins with 'm.'" For learning shapes: "I see a circle/rectangle." (clock/door.) For learning materials: "I see something made of glass." For practicing adjectives: "I see something small and round." ...You get the picture. Make sure they use English and say "the clock? the door?" rather than just "this? this? this?"

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6 years 37 weeks ago
 
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