The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
3
3
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Q: Does the average Chinese feel they are contributing to society?

Does the Chinese people you know (or is) have a feeling they are part of building modern China, or do they see themselves as people who are just on for the ride?

 

Edit: When I ask about society, I am talking about China as a whole. The economic growth, the high speed rails etc. The things that are obvious sources of pride for people, do people feel like contributers? 

 

 

7 years 44 weeks ago in  Culture - China

 
Highest Voted
8
8
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Anyone who looks on the concept of society favourably shows courtesy to people they don't know.

 

China has no sense of community. Nobody is prepared to go to any personal effort to make their society a better place. Chinese people have no notion of contributing to something without obvious, personal benefit.

 

In other countries, people have reached a social consensus - If we all treat each other with respect, everyone benefits. In China it’s a race to climb on top of each other. Everyone for themselves, and everyone loses. That's “Communism”.

Report Abuse
7 years 44 weeks ago
 
Answers (4)
Comments (4)
8
8
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Anyone who looks on the concept of society favourably shows courtesy to people they don't know.

 

China has no sense of community. Nobody is prepared to go to any personal effort to make their society a better place. Chinese people have no notion of contributing to something without obvious, personal benefit.

 

In other countries, people have reached a social consensus - If we all treat each other with respect, everyone benefits. In China it’s a race to climb on top of each other. Everyone for themselves, and everyone loses. That's “Communism”.

Report Abuse
7 years 44 weeks ago
 
Posts: 1847

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

It depends on exactly what you mean by the question. In the Chinese countryside, there is a strong community spirit because, without pooling their combined resources, collectively they all collapse together. Farming communities rely on each other for survival. If a well is needed, several families will combine physical or perhaps financial resources to make it happen then share the benefit. However, in the cities, Chinese macroeconomic policies and "mind management" have combined to form the biggest rat race on earth. Then it becomes each for their own and the devil takes the hindmost. It is the Open and Reform Policy and the rapid expansion of the economy thereafter created all the selfishness and greed. Traditionally, community spirit is strong amongst Chinese.

Report Abuse
7 years 44 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

It depends, for the most part I would have to agree with Kai and Sam, even my wife, if I ask her to attend an important business dinner her reply is typically, why, how does it benefit her. I have noticed in the younger generations that they are trying desperately to change the image of China in regards to society and environmental issues, but the mass majority believe in me, me, me, and nothing else. I also see they heavily rely on Short-Term gains instead of Long-Term gains, they would prefer to cheat and steal and close shop in two or three years instead of relying on honesty and hospitality to make close relationships that could, in essence show the most profit over  a longer period of time.

Report Abuse
7 years 44 weeks ago
 
Posts: 311

General

1
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Not that much feeling.

Report Abuse
4 years 32 weeks ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: If you earned a Master's Degree in English Literature or a related sub
A:If you earned a Master's Degree in English Literature or a related subject, you can teach English legally in China even if you don't hold a passport from the usually accepted list of countries. The visa requirements clearly specifies this “loophole”.Nonetheless, I think this requirement is only for teaching English. If you are a licensed teacher of another discipline, such as Math or Physics, you don't need to be a native speaker, although most schools would rather hire a teacher from a country where English is the native language.Right now China’s borders are closed (does anyone have new information?), at least that’s what everyone is saying. China is probably only going to reopen the borders again once most of the population is vaccinated, and that might take a while. -- samvelasco87