The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
2
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
2

Q: Does Cannabis help in pain relief?

4 weeks 4 days ago in  Health & Safety - Other cities

 
Highest Voted
Posts: 3583

Emperor

1
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

why is it that all the comments that this poster made are on threads that have been deleted??

 

"a Former Economic development specialist, working for the Department of Commerce and chambers of commerce to find effective ways to revive rural communities. And I have been publisehed so many articles on health, personal responsibility and freedom."

according to her 'bio' 

Report Abuse
4 weeks 3 days ago
 
Answers (5)
Comments (1)
Posts: 18160

Emperor

0
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Yes,  I HEARD that, too! 

 

 

CBD strains especially ...

 

Report Abuse
4 weeks 4 days ago
 
Posts: 3583

Emperor

1
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

why is it that all the comments that this poster made are on threads that have been deleted??

 

"a Former Economic development specialist, working for the Department of Commerce and chambers of commerce to find effective ways to revive rural communities. And I have been publisehed so many articles on health, personal responsibility and freedom."

according to her 'bio' 

Report Abuse
4 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 18160

Emperor

1
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

https://theconversation.com/home-grown-cannabis-how-covid-19-has-fuelled...

 

Home-grown cannabis: how COVID-19 has fuelled a boom around the world

 

Someone handling a cannabis plant

Green fingers. Igor Shapovalov/Alamy

 

Back in the days when “skunk” was mainly associated with Pepé Le Pew and hydroponics was a way of improving cucumbers, most of the UK’s cannabis supply was imported from places such as Morocco and Lebanon. This changed in the past two or three decades in the UK and many other countries as organised criminal gangs set up growing operations closer to home.

Cannabis was still cultivated and distributed out of the more exotic locations on a large scale, particularly when it came to resin, but a fair amount of production had now moved closer to the demand in a process economists call import substitution.

It is hard to measure this accurately, but the Independent Drug Monitoring Unit estimated that by 2012, 80% of the cannabis used in the UK was grown here – up from 30% in the late 1990s. It is probably well over 90% now.

But in recent years, cannabis has undergone another major shift. A sizeable share of demand is now met by small-scale growers, mainly supplying themselves and friends and acquaintances. This has become possible for various reasons, including improvements to growing technology, new strains more suited to indoor growing, and the wealth of information and expertise on the internet. As such, many cannabis users no longer depend on traditional drug dealers.

This trend has been gaining momentum during the pandemic. So is this permanent or will the old supply chains reassert themselves when countries return to some kind of normality?

Keeping up with cannabis

Myself and a group of like-minded cannabis researchers across Europe, North America and Australasia formed the Global Cannabis Cultivation Research Consortium in 2009 to monitor the growth of domestic cultivation and how cannabis markets were evolving.

, we surveyed growers in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the UK and the US to find out more about small-scale growing, and how and why they these people got involved. Most turned out to be regular people - with normal jobs, normal family arrangements, and no more involvement in drug dealing or other crime than any other section of the public.

 

Man cultivating cannabishttps://images.theconversation.com/files/388806/original/file-20210310-1... 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388806/original/file-20210310-1... 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388806/original/file-20210310-1... 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388806/original/file-20210310-1... 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388806/original/file-20210310-1... 2262w" />

 You reap what you sow. 

Cannabis policy has since been changing around the world. An ever-growing list of countries has legalised it, in some form, for medical use. A number have changed their laws so that cannabis possession (and, in some cases, cultivation for personal use) is no longer a criminal offence. Most significantly, Canada, Uruguay and various US states have legalised not only medical but recreational use too.

In 2020, we launched our second international survey to see how cultivation was being affected by this shifting backdrop. This time we looked at 18 countries, adding France, Georgia, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Portugal and Uruguay to the original 11, while also running a survey for people in non-participating countries. A global pandemic and national lockdowns had not been part of our planning, but of course we added questions to find out the effects.

The new findings

Since COVID-19 has affected almost every area of life, you would expect it to affect drug use and drug markets. People have been spending more time at home. Social interactions have been limited, including opportunities to take drugs with friends or to obtain them from the usual sources. Meanwhile, national and international drug supply networks have been disrupted.

Sure enough, our preliminary findings suggest that COVID-19 has affected domestic cannabis cultivation around the world. With nearly 5,000 participants at the time of writing, 16% report only becoming involved in cannabis growing since the pandemic. There are 11% of respondents saying that having more time at home was why they were growing, while 8% cite increased cannabis prices during the pandemic as a motivating factor.

More than one-third of respondents reported that it was harder to meet up in person with people they grew with, or to obtain cannabis through personal social networks or their usual dealer. Yet fewer than one in ten reported that it was harder to get hold of cannabis seeds, growing equipment, or other supplies like fertilisers.

There is some interesting variation between countries in the findings. In Italy, more than one-quarter of respondents had started growing since the pandemic started – noticeably above the global average. Meanwhile, one-third of Portuguese respondents cited a shortage of cannabis during COVID-19 as a reason for growing their own.

Besides the pandemic, most home growers across the world pointed to other motivations that were in line with our 2012 findings: wanting a product that is healthier and cheaper, while avoiding contact with criminals.

Three-quarters of respondents report that they grow cannabis because they get pleasure from doing so. Nearly half report that they are growing for their own medical use. And while 15% report growing to supply others with cannabis for medical use and 15% supply others for recreational use, our growers are not acting as drug dealers: only 4% reported selling cannabis for profit.

Woman on a bed lighting a jointhttps://images.theconversation.com/files/388809/original/file-20210310-1... 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388809/original/file-20210310-1... 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388809/original/file-20210310-1... 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388809/original/file-20210310-1... 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/388809/original/file-20210310-1... 2262w" />

 'The fruits of my labours.'

But if lockdown has led a significant number of people to start growing their own cannabis, it is also important to note that the vast majority of our participants were growing it already. And while many respondents (18%) reported growing more under lockdown, one in ten said they were growing less or had stopped altogether. Meanwhile, organised crime continues to supply a large chunk of the UK cannabis market.

It must be stressed that these are only preliminary findings. We want to double the number of respondents to at least 10,000 in the coming months, and will publish the final results early in 2022. Then we intend to carry on our research to see if these trends continue as the pandemic recedes. We strongly suspect it will: once people get the habit of growing their own, there is little reason to go back to buying from dealers.

  

 

Report Abuse
4 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 4768

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

There's nothing a quality doob can't fix.

Report Abuse
4 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 18160

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://news.yahoo.com/nyu-shanghai-seeking-answers-police-064654007.html

 

NYU Shanghai seeking answers after police detain 9 students

Mon, March 22, 2021, 7:46 AM

 

SHANGHAI (AP) — New York University said Monday it was seeking more information from Chinese authorities after nine students from its Shanghai campus were temporarily detained in what appeared to be police dragnet for drug suspects.

A statement from the university said two students were held as part of a police action outside a bar and the other seven were at a birthday party at an off-campus apartment on March 12 when police arrived and brought all present in for drug testing.

“None of the students were found to have used or been in possession of drugs and none were arrested,” NYU Shanghai said in a statement. China hosts a large number of foreign students, a number increased by the opening of satellite campuses by British and American universities.

 

“Being brought in for testing as part of a drug sweep was understandably frightening for our students ... Since then we have continued to provide support for the affected students," said a statement from the school sent to The Associated Press on Monday.

Police who arrived at the birthday party were apparently looking for a specific individual but it wasn’t clear who that was and no one was arrested.

The students at the bar that same night told school authorities that, upon leaving the venue, they were approached by a person wearing plainclothes who showed a badge they did not recognize. One tried to leave, both were detained and suffered minor injuries, and all other bar patrons and staff, all of them Chinese citizens, were also detained and subjected to drug testing.

The students were all released by the next morning after their drug tests came back negative, NYU said. Six of the students were American while the other three came from Finland, Malaysia and Morocco.

“We are currently seeking more information from city authorities to better understand last weekend’s police actions," the university's statement said.

There was no immediate response to requests for comment from the Shanghai police. People caught using recreational drugs such as marijuana and cocaine can be locked up for months or longer in China, while dealers can receive the death sentence.

 

Report Abuse
2 weeks 6 days ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Any headline containing: slams, destroys, or some similar hyperbolic b
A:Any headline containing: slams, destroys, or some similar hyperbolic bollocks immediately identifies itself are an article full of opinion pretending to be fact, and not worth reading. -- Sandnose