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Posts: 1304

Shifu

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Q: An ethnic minority Chinese marries a Han Chinese and they have a kid together

What race is the kid in the eyes of the government? As in what is put on his birth certificate? And when the kid grows up, what is the race of his kid?

 

 

2 years 17 weeks ago in  Family & Kids - China

 
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Both of my kids have Han listed on their Chinese birth certs. I tried to get them to put Han/Celt but they were having none of it. 

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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Shifu

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This question is not about me, just one of the things I think about sometimes. 

 

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2 years 17 weeks ago
 
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Emperor

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Have a look at this and don't miss comments:

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-26/red-hen

 

Similar thing as I was pointing it out to you from 'umerican' side ...

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-26/red-hen-owner-resigns-director...

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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General

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hi2, you haven't received a good answer yet.  Try sending a private message to Sponge Bob.  She's not too bad at giving reliable answers when she remembers to take her meds.

 

Guessing, I would say the husband's ethnicity is the deciding factor for the birth certificate, assuming only one choice is an option.  The birth certificate may simply list the ethnicities of both parents, and that's it.  Alternatively, if the local practice is to not use Han, maybe the parents have enough guanxi to have Han listed on the certificate.  I believe in general that parents will try to select Han if possible, given the social status that designation carries. 

 

What about you guys that have children born in China, what's on the birth certificate?

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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Shifu

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Ya pretty shit answers so far I gotta say. I know that the ethnic minorities have some privileges, like they're exempt from some English classes in uni. So my question is asking if a baby is born to a Han and a minority, is the baby listed as Han or the minority on his ID? And if he's listed as Han and he has a baby with another minority is his baby also Han? Does the one drop rule apply to Han Chinese?

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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Both of my kids have Han listed on their Chinese birth certs. I tried to get them to put Han/Celt but they were having none of it. 

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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I won't contradict Mike directly, but looking at samples of Chinese birth certificates, only the nationalities of the parents are declared on the birth certicates.  There is no statement of ethnicity.

 

Oddly, the birth certificates have a statement for the period of gestation (how long the mother was pregnant), which can be a difficult thing to determine with any precision in many cases.

 

It seems the issue or claim of non-Han ethnicity arises through the hukuo system of household registration.  Apparently, a claim as an ethnic minority can be made through the heritage of either or both parents.  The exact mechanics of how that is done is unclear.  Maybe Mike has some more info about this.

 

As pointed out, there are some benefits to being part of an ethnic minority in China, such as being free of the restrictions of the previous one-child policy, and receiving a slight preference for acceptances at university.  Conversely, rural ethnic minorities haven't received equal socio-economic status and opportunities as their rural Han contemporaries, generally speaking.

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2 years 16 weeks ago
 
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Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs