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Q: How to transport pet to your homecountry?

I'm thinking about buying a cat but not sure if I could easily transport it to EU. I've never tried to travel with pets. 

I know that they must have chips and passports and should stay at a quarantine station before flight... are these rules only for international flights or not? how long is a quarantine?  Is it easy to do in China?

 

I don't want to buy a pet and after 1-2 years abandon it.

 

4 years 35 weeks ago in  Transport & Travel - China

 
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I travel a lot (see my pic), and-ddd.........Yahoo-gle on your Q:

 

http://dogtime.com/transporting-pets-europe.html

 

Here are some tips that will help to make your pet's trip as safe and comfortable as possible:

 

Crate Training - Perhaps the most important step in the entire process. By acclimating your pet to its travel kennel well ahead of the travel date, your pet will feel comfortable in its soon-to-be travel environment. Not only do travel kennels serve as a means to protect your pet physically, but emotionally as well. The more familiar your pet is with its travel kennel at home, the more it will be used as a "safe zone" during travel.

Airline Selection - What may often appear to be the best route of travel for you is not always the best route for your pets. Very few airlines implement complete "pet-safe" programs, so it is very important to do your research and ask which airlines are most pet friendly. "Pet-safe" policies include, but are not limited to, making sure your pets are always climate controlled, never leaving them out on the tarmac, and making sure they are the last ones on the plane and the first ones off. In addition, a majority of airlines only accept live animals within certain outside temperature constraints, so seasonal traveling can often prove difficult. By using a "pet-safe" carrier, these climate restrictions can be easily avoided. When traveling to Europe, we recommend ContinentalKLMBritish Airways, and Lufthansa Airlines, all of which have excellent pet programs in place.

Import Requirements - Pets moving into the EU fall under the jurisdiction of Commission Regulation (EC) No 998/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council. In summary, with the exception of the UK, Sweden, and Norway, EU import requirements for all dogs, cats, and ferrets are as follows:

1) Microchip: Each pet shall be identified by means of a microchip. No other form of identification is acceptable. The microchip used should comply with ISO Standard 11784 or Annex A to ISO standard 11785--otherwise the pet will need to be sent with its own scanner attached to the top of the crate.

2) All animals need to have full vaccinations:

Dogs: DistemperHepatitisParvoLeptospirosis (DHLPP), and Rabies within the last 12 months or a minimum of 4 weeks before arrival.

Cats: Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia (FVRCP), and Rabies within the last 12 months or a minimum of 4 weeks before arrival.

3) EU Vet Health Certificate (Form EC#: 998, available from PetRelocation.com) - This is the standard health certificate to be filled out by your accredited veterinarian. Although this certificate is technically valid for 4 months, it is recommended to be completed and endorsed by the USDA within 10 days of travel to avoid any customs issues upon arrival.

4) Government Endorsement (USDA when departing from the United States): The below referenced forms:

Microchip Implantation Record
Rabies Certificate
EU Vet Health Certificate

5) International Health Certificate: Your vet should have these in stock. It's a good idea to call ahead and ask. This is an international health certificate that needs to be completed by your vet within 10 days of departure. Depending on the logistics of your particular pet relocation and the specific health certificate being used (APHIS Form 7001 when departing from the United States) an additional USDA Endorsement maybe required on this health certificate.

6) All original documentation must travel with the pets.

International Pet Relocation Services - There are many full service pet relocation agencies available worldwide that are able to facilitate all of your pet's travel arrangements. Services can include residential pickups and deliveries, flight bookings, airport check-in, customs clearance and import handling, assistance with health documentation, and anything else you or your pet might need. These services make life much easier, but with the service come added costs.

As can be seen above, many variables need to be carefully accounted for when relocating your pet to Europe. While daunting at times, if taken piece by piece, your pet's move can be a snap. Just remember to plan accordingly and enjoy your new home!

 

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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It's not just transporting your cat, it's the rules regarding importing an animal to your own country.

 

A lot of countries have very strict regulations so they don't end up with rabies etc in their country - I would check the requirements for your country before considering getting a cat.

 

It can be done, I've seen threads on other forums where people talk about it, but there is a lot of hassle with vet certificates, quarantine periods and actual transportation of the pet. Depending on where you are and how good your Chinese is, this could be reasonable straight forward or it could be a nightmare with different people telling you different things or saying it can't be done despite what their website tells you. TIC.

 

 

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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Best thing to do is call the airline you will use. They have alots of info. if its an airline specific to your country or region they will also have info about how to get it in.

I know people that have brought dogs back. Yeah its a hassle but no more so than any other problems. Good for you by the way. Most would just ditch a cat. Respect.

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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Put it on a plane....and pay a lot of money

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Would prefer to read some practical advice. I read quite a lot. But still don't know prices for those vet passports and quarantine... how long should it be.. I'm not in China yet, so can't go to the vet and ask.

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I travel a lot (see my pic), and-ddd.........Yahoo-gle on your Q:

 

http://dogtime.com/transporting-pets-europe.html

 

Here are some tips that will help to make your pet's trip as safe and comfortable as possible:

 

Crate Training - Perhaps the most important step in the entire process. By acclimating your pet to its travel kennel well ahead of the travel date, your pet will feel comfortable in its soon-to-be travel environment. Not only do travel kennels serve as a means to protect your pet physically, but emotionally as well. The more familiar your pet is with its travel kennel at home, the more it will be used as a "safe zone" during travel.

Airline Selection - What may often appear to be the best route of travel for you is not always the best route for your pets. Very few airlines implement complete "pet-safe" programs, so it is very important to do your research and ask which airlines are most pet friendly. "Pet-safe" policies include, but are not limited to, making sure your pets are always climate controlled, never leaving them out on the tarmac, and making sure they are the last ones on the plane and the first ones off. In addition, a majority of airlines only accept live animals within certain outside temperature constraints, so seasonal traveling can often prove difficult. By using a "pet-safe" carrier, these climate restrictions can be easily avoided. When traveling to Europe, we recommend ContinentalKLMBritish Airways, and Lufthansa Airlines, all of which have excellent pet programs in place.

Import Requirements - Pets moving into the EU fall under the jurisdiction of Commission Regulation (EC) No 998/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council. In summary, with the exception of the UK, Sweden, and Norway, EU import requirements for all dogs, cats, and ferrets are as follows:

1) Microchip: Each pet shall be identified by means of a microchip. No other form of identification is acceptable. The microchip used should comply with ISO Standard 11784 or Annex A to ISO standard 11785--otherwise the pet will need to be sent with its own scanner attached to the top of the crate.

2) All animals need to have full vaccinations:

Dogs: DistemperHepatitisParvoLeptospirosis (DHLPP), and Rabies within the last 12 months or a minimum of 4 weeks before arrival.

Cats: Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia (FVRCP), and Rabies within the last 12 months or a minimum of 4 weeks before arrival.

3) EU Vet Health Certificate (Form EC#: 998, available from PetRelocation.com) - This is the standard health certificate to be filled out by your accredited veterinarian. Although this certificate is technically valid for 4 months, it is recommended to be completed and endorsed by the USDA within 10 days of travel to avoid any customs issues upon arrival.

4) Government Endorsement (USDA when departing from the United States): The below referenced forms:

Microchip Implantation Record
Rabies Certificate
EU Vet Health Certificate

5) International Health Certificate: Your vet should have these in stock. It's a good idea to call ahead and ask. This is an international health certificate that needs to be completed by your vet within 10 days of departure. Depending on the logistics of your particular pet relocation and the specific health certificate being used (APHIS Form 7001 when departing from the United States) an additional USDA Endorsement maybe required on this health certificate.

6) All original documentation must travel with the pets.

International Pet Relocation Services - There are many full service pet relocation agencies available worldwide that are able to facilitate all of your pet's travel arrangements. Services can include residential pickups and deliveries, flight bookings, airport check-in, customs clearance and import handling, assistance with health documentation, and anything else you or your pet might need. These services make life much easier, but with the service come added costs.

As can be seen above, many variables need to be carefully accounted for when relocating your pet to Europe. While daunting at times, if taken piece by piece, your pet's move can be a snap. Just remember to plan accordingly and enjoy your new home!

 

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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Now its more clear. Still have a question about expenses in China. Don't know what to expect and would my cat need any kind of a quarantine?

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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Step one is to contact local authorities in your destination country. All EU countries are working within the same set of rules, but it is the health authorities in your destination country that has the final say, you want their blessing

Step two. Plan the route. E.g. for us flying out of southern China with our dog, there is only one airport, Guangzhou, only one airline, Air France, and only 4 departures per week. All other flights our of southern China are codeshare with Chinese airlines that don't allow pets in the cabin, or they have some crazy route with a 35 hour stopover in Sibiria. 

Step three. Find a good vet in China to help with vaccination and testing. In Shanghai etc I am sure there must be western people working as vets that has expirience with the export procedure

 

Also. The pet relocation business is very ..... well, dishonest really. E.g. some would offer your to pay for a lot of stuff that is not needed, or you'd pay for basically getting information that you can find online.

 

Prepare early. If you get a pet today, your preparation starts today. Get all the needed shots right away, have them boosted each year (or as needed)  

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4 years 35 weeks ago
 
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