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Q: Ok, dumb question of the year, but

in some ways I really am serious.  I got a bit of a quandary.  I played on several schools for a job, kept several in play just so I could pick the very best offer, and kept the other ones hanging on in case the other didn't work out for some reason or another.

 

Well, I'm 90% set on one now, but have 3 others who I kinda lead-on to believe I would sign with them.  So, how do I get out of this?  I hate being a dick* about it, but I had to look out for my own best interests.  I'm inclined to go the direct, honest way and tell them I got a better offer.  But I'm open to other ideas/suggestions too.

 

Surely you guys have been in similar situation.  I sure feel guilty about telling them 'no thanks' now.   oh well.....

 

*even though I am

5 weeks 3 days ago in  Business & Jobs - China

 
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You can be very straight forward and clean about this.  Tell each of the schools you plan to reject that you received a "better employment opportunity" at another school, and thank them for considering you.  You don't need to give specifics unless asked, and only then say more if you think it might do some good to getter a better offer from the school.  A decent school that thinks you're a good catch will do something to sweeten the offer if it can.

 

If a school is sincere about seeing if it can match or better the one offer you are leaning towards now, then give them your wish list of what more you'd like to see on the table--whether it's more money (always), fewer obligations (office hours, extra activities), better support, increased benefits, etc.  You have nothing to lose by asking for more.  By doing that you give the school a chance to improve its offer, or at least learn what it could do better for the next job candidate that comes along.  If you don't say anything about why you rejected a school, and the school never asks, then the school may not readily learn what its perceived deficiencies are.  In a small way, you can help move the needle on the market for the next guy that comes along.

 

Don't feel any guilt or shame about applying to more than one school at the same time.  Pretty much every school is also interviewing candidates besides you, and as pointed out above, they won't bother to tell you much about that.  Everyone knows this is the new employment season for schools.  Teachers are testing the market, and schools are testing the teachers.  And you have nothing to apologize for by accepting a job at another school.  Conversely, not saying you're rejecting the offer would be unprofessional and create unnecessary ill-will with the rejected school.

 

As to T.F., I think she is having another identity crisis.  This time it's about her sexual identity . . . or is this a continuation of her previous identity crisis?

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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In China, one must always talk to/apply at several Schools in the same time, and then pick one with the best conditions.

I know, it's different than we do in West ...

More to that, 'pick one which will go through all requirements to get you new WP and RP and things'.

One should never let one employer know about other employment possibilities ... and you should talk to several Schools till the best Contract is on offer and your signature is pending.

 

Considering 'negotiating' as an important 'issue' in Chinese culture.

 

On the other side of the coin:

 

"How many times did you receive reply from Chinese School: 'Thank you for your application! .... We choose another candidate ....' or any reply whatsoever?"

 

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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I am in the same position. I don't want to be a p*ssy and not tell the other school that I have accepted another offer but I think I will just grow a pair of balls and tell them without any emotions. This happened before but the other school gave me a better offer and I told the opposing school this and they allowed me to negotiate. 

 

 

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 143

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You can be very straight forward and clean about this.  Tell each of the schools you plan to reject that you received a "better employment opportunity" at another school, and thank them for considering you.  You don't need to give specifics unless asked, and only then say more if you think it might do some good to getter a better offer from the school.  A decent school that thinks you're a good catch will do something to sweeten the offer if it can.

 

If a school is sincere about seeing if it can match or better the one offer you are leaning towards now, then give them your wish list of what more you'd like to see on the table--whether it's more money (always), fewer obligations (office hours, extra activities), better support, increased benefits, etc.  You have nothing to lose by asking for more.  By doing that you give the school a chance to improve its offer, or at least learn what it could do better for the next job candidate that comes along.  If you don't say anything about why you rejected a school, and the school never asks, then the school may not readily learn what its perceived deficiencies are.  In a small way, you can help move the needle on the market for the next guy that comes along.

 

Don't feel any guilt or shame about applying to more than one school at the same time.  Pretty much every school is also interviewing candidates besides you, and as pointed out above, they won't bother to tell you much about that.  Everyone knows this is the new employment season for schools.  Teachers are testing the market, and schools are testing the teachers.  And you have nothing to apologize for by accepting a job at another school.  Conversely, not saying you're rejecting the offer would be unprofessional and create unnecessary ill-will with the rejected school.

 

As to T.F., I think she is having another identity crisis.  This time it's about her sexual identity . . . or is this a continuation of her previous identity crisis?

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Good points all.  Thx guys.  I am going to be Straight-forward, Direct, & Honest and just tell them I have accepted a different offer.  They deserve the honest answer.

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Your not even a contender for Dumbest Question of the year.
The bar is way way higher than this effort

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5 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Just tell the other schools you got an offer from another school and tell them a pay and benefits that other schools could not possibly match. And tell them if there is a change in things you will contact them. That way you don’t really burn your bridges.

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5 weeks 2 days ago
 
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I think that's a normal part of the job hunting process for anyone. In the end it's the employer that wants you, so they need to make you a good offer. I wish more people would do this kind of thing as it would cause salaries to increase overall. 

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5 weeks 2 days ago
 
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Don't worry so much. It's fine to just tell them that you got a better offer. If you want to keep them in the background in case things don't work out in your new place, then you could tell them that you are not ready to sign yet and possibly next semester/year would be better.

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5 weeks 1 day ago
 
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