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Q: Is only allowing native speakers of English to legally teach in china reasonable?

But let's say that anyone can come to china with a degree and knowledge of English and can legally teach, would you not have a flood of people from poorer countries coming to china to teach English? They have this problem now and it's not allowed....so imagine if it was allowed..

 

And there are cases where you have a highly skillful, highly qualified person but not from an English speaking country that is denied a job.

 

Are the laws like this similar in Asian countries where ESL is popular?

 

 

2 years 43 weeks ago in  Visa & Legalities - China

 
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OMG - I cannot believe how ignorant the OP is!

 

Seriously!

 

Do you think the English that people speak all over the world has ONLY been taught by native speakers from the 'Big 5'???

 

So, to answer your question - hell yes! Non-native speakers of a language have every right to be able to teach a language if they are sufficiently qualified in the language, in teaching, AND experienced in using the language normally in the language environment.

 

Take a look (or listen) to all the Swedes, Danes, Norwegians, Germans, Finns, etc etc etc who speak AWESOME English (and yes, even Russians and Ukrainians, and Greeks, and and and... not to mention, the MANY peoples in Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Botswana, to name a few) and the Carribean nations.

 

What the Chinese government needs to do is to STOP focussing solely on passport (cos, you know, even those passports do NOT indicate language ability... check out Canadian passports as a perfect example!) and actually base proficiency on ACCREDITED, internationally recognised tests! Put in specifics about 'no module (eg, speaking) less than X score", and voila! Problem solvered!

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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I am happy it isn't allowed, I go to Hong Kong every weekend, I can't tell you how terrible it looks seeing hundreds of people (I won't point out the nationality) just sitting outside on new papers and boxes eating, I mean its not just in a few places, it was every where, hey it is nice to have a good chat with your friends, but not like this, it made my parents feel HK was a poor city of China just seeing these foreigners gathered in groups all over the place and I mean every where, I don't want China to look like this and China closes its borders for a reason, just look at what is happening around America and England, the people we let in from "all over the world" are attacking our people. Good Job China, don't let them in.

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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Not reasonable.
It would be logical to base requirements off related experience and certs or degrees..and as for oral English teaching: their accent should be taken into account as well.

Of course, using logic and working to keep high quality standards is nearly impossible to find in China/

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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OMG - I cannot believe how ignorant the OP is!

 

Seriously!

 

Do you think the English that people speak all over the world has ONLY been taught by native speakers from the 'Big 5'???

 

So, to answer your question - hell yes! Non-native speakers of a language have every right to be able to teach a language if they are sufficiently qualified in the language, in teaching, AND experienced in using the language normally in the language environment.

 

Take a look (or listen) to all the Swedes, Danes, Norwegians, Germans, Finns, etc etc etc who speak AWESOME English (and yes, even Russians and Ukrainians, and Greeks, and and and... not to mention, the MANY peoples in Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Nigeria, Botswana, to name a few) and the Carribean nations.

 

What the Chinese government needs to do is to STOP focussing solely on passport (cos, you know, even those passports do NOT indicate language ability... check out Canadian passports as a perfect example!) and actually base proficiency on ACCREDITED, internationally recognised tests! Put in specifics about 'no module (eg, speaking) less than X score", and voila! Problem solvered!

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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And it'd be nice if everyone had a big house to live in. Learn this word, 'logistics'. How does a country of non English speakers assess English level? Chinese English speakers are also non-native, so they should give up their positions to foreigners? I wouldn't want that for America, another word you should look up , 'economics'.

This is reality, learn to live in it.

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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1.  Reasonable  ---  how many daluren have you come across who can think logically?

 

2.  Money --- how many daluren have you come across who are not obsessed with money?  Meaning, the one who pay is 'right', at least until you have their money in your pocket. 

 

3.  Native whatever language speakers, logically, learn to speak their native language usually by the age of five, including the accent part. Now whether that is a plus depends on what accent you have. As far as English goes, at least in Asia, the 'BBC accent' is widely accepted as the benchmark. (Don't ask me, I don't know why). So, if the parents, i.e. the payers want their kids to speak that accent, and THEY think a native english speaker from UK is a better bet, AND if you want to improve the odds even more, a white guy from UK is even better, what are you going to do about it? 

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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Did you read your question Biggi?

 

Is only allowing native speakers of English to legally teach in china reasonable?

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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I see no reason why people outside the "Big 5" shouldn't be allowed to teach English if they're qualified. The only thing that currently "qualifies" TEFL teachers from the Big 5 is their passport, a degree (in ANY subject), 2-years work experience (Dong ANYTHING) & any old TEFL certificate. 

 

My best English teacher in high school in the UK was Indian...Dr. Bhattia. Note the "Dr"....his doctorate was in English! Did he have an Indian accent? Yes! Did it affect how we learnt from him? No! We're used to hearing multitudes of different accents in the UK. 

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2 years 42 weeks ago
 
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