The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.

By continuing you agree to eChinacities's Privacy Policy .

Sign up with Google Sign up with Facebook
Sign up with Email Already have an account? .
Posts: 832

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Q: Working on a student visa?

Hey, so I know you are not supposed to work on a student visa, but how are you supposed to support yourself when going to university in China?

7 years 12 weeks ago in  Visa & Legalities - Other cities

 
Answers (11)
Comments (10)
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

type in the questions bar  student visa and instead of ask select search and you will find what you need

You will have to sift through it but you will find some answers  

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 917

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

You can work.  Just be discreet about it.  Language schools will offer you part-time work (and hide you in the WC when the visa cops come knocking), private tutoring in a cafe, pouring drinks or DJ-ing in an expat pub, gigging at weddings & private parties if you're a guitar player, making and selling handicrafts, etc.  All sorts of stuff you can do to make a mao.  Tutoring is probably your best bet.

Now, your turn.  What do you think you can do to make some money?

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 832

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Well, I have been teaching in China for three years, so have some experience. I just don't wanna get deported if I am found working on a student visa.. haha.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 3046

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Rin: If you desire to play Russian roulette, be my guest.  And do have fun doing it.  But if you blow your brains out, do not cry afterwards. 

Maybe for you working in China without a proper visa is a child's game. But for the Chinese, it is a serious one, showing a lack of respect from you to them, their laws and regulations.

And guess what ?. They are so serious about it that them just ammended the law to tighten it more to prevent working without a proper visa. It will be implemented July 1, 2013.

Those found working without proper documentation, will be arrested, taken to jail, fined (from 500 to 10,000 Rmb), and deported, and will not be allowed to return to China for a period of 5 to 10 years. And the school will face a 10,000 yuan fine too.

Now that you have the real facts, make up your mind and decide what to do. I do assure you it will not be a "slap on your wrist" at all.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 832

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Yeah,I just read the new visa rules and am worried about this. As I already asked though, how do people support themselves? I was reading up on other countries. Apparently in Japan it is legal to work on a student visa. China just seems to make things harder and harder for us.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I don't think it is a good choice work with a student "X" visa,it is illegal ,if you happen to official check,then big problem for your future in China,so,better not.

you can choose a good company ( after graduation) which is qualified for hiring foreigners,then you can apply work "Z" visa .

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Unfortunately some bad apples spoiled the bunch, it used to be that you could work up to 14 hours a week on a student visa but, when people began to abuse that law, for example: People not showing up for class and using the X visa as a Z visa and working full time, has been the problem. A X visa was relatively easier to get so now they have applied new laws to the X visa and the Z visa. On the other hand, there are still many people who do this, and with success, some do not, so when they are caught, typically they make an example out of them, just doesn't seem worth it, but again, I have a friend who used to work on a Z visa but later changed because he can work for multiple people off contract and makes about 30,000 a month by simply freelancing. Just got to go with your gut and realize the consequences if your caught.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 832

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

My question still stands. If you can't work on a student visa, how are you supposed to support yourself?

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 196

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I think the Chinese government don't really care whether you can support yourself or not. It's a harsh truth, but considering the situation that is the most plausible explanation. In their minds, maybe you go home and then another foreigner will step in with a better financial situation.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 3442

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I'll agree with Masque. It is not the Chinese government's concern whether you can support yourself or not. They simply don't care. It's your problem

 

You have been given sound advice, but keep asking the same thing over and over, looking for someone to agree with you. If you can't support yourself, pack up and go home, or take the risk of being deported. It's your choice how you go home.

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 196

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

I've already made a clear suggestion, I want to follow up by saying if you do intend to work, don't do it near your school. The area around your school is probably the most likely to look around for students that are working. It may seem strange, but find some place not in the greater metropolitan area that is not a visibly operating business and then work for them.

 

I really shouldn't disclose much about myself, but I will say I did a internship in Shanghai several years ago while working on my master. They put me on a student visa. The stipend I got wasn't 'satisfactory' so I found work off-campus on the weekends. What I did may seem extreme, but I took a train out of Shanghai into a smaller tier 3 city in Jiangsu and worked. I taught maths, biology, and physics to kids preparing to study abroad. The school where I worked paid the police monthly to keep them out. They actually paid the police to have an officers unemployed uncle or something just sit outside and wear a security guards outfit. It may seem strange to you, but if you follow my plan, when you are looking for work be direct and ask the boss if they're paying for protection. Just a side note, student visas don't restrict movement within China, so if you do that and a pig stops you, just say you're traveling. 

Report Abuse
7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs