The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.
Posts: 1

Common folk

2
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
2

Q: Z visa for non native English teachers??

I have a BA in English Language and literature and years of teaching experiences. I am trying to find a job as an English teacher in China and it seems impossible, everybody rejects my application just for not being a native!

I would like to know if there is any solution for this matter. 

Thanks 

13 weeks 3 days ago in  Visa & Legalities - China

 
Highest Voted
Posts: 475

General

4
4
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The more "high end" English schools most likely won't hire anyone non native or without the proper credentials. I'm sure you can find a job at some shit training center since they will take anyone who does not look Chinese and any form of education is not needed.. Point is...any place that requires you to have a work visa most likely won't and cant hire you legally. There are ways around it, but it's up to the school if they can pull some strings, but it's rare for that to happen anymore.

 

I had a friend from Greece who was teaching in China before the new laws came into effect. He had similar education as you. When he applied for his new work permit they only gave him 6 months and only because he was working before the law came. They said he would not be able to renew or get a new work permit after these 6 months...not for English teaching anyway.

Report Abuse
13 weeks 2 days ago
 
Answers (7)
Comments (4)
Posts: 15591

Emperor

2
2
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

One chance with legal employment (Z) for Non-native passport holder in China was (2017):

 

"If your degree was completed in Native English country ...", but I left China instead.

Report Abuse
13 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 865

Governor

1
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

keep applying. ive met quite a few english teachers not from a native english speaking country. 

Report Abuse
13 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 475

General

4
4
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The more "high end" English schools most likely won't hire anyone non native or without the proper credentials. I'm sure you can find a job at some shit training center since they will take anyone who does not look Chinese and any form of education is not needed.. Point is...any place that requires you to have a work visa most likely won't and cant hire you legally. There are ways around it, but it's up to the school if they can pull some strings, but it's rare for that to happen anymore.

 

I had a friend from Greece who was teaching in China before the new laws came into effect. He had similar education as you. When he applied for his new work permit they only gave him 6 months and only because he was working before the law came. They said he would not be able to renew or get a new work permit after these 6 months...not for English teaching anyway.

Report Abuse
13 weeks 2 days ago
 
Posts: 4104

Emperor

0
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Yeah like Icnif said, if your degree was obtained in a native speaking country you're eligible for a visa, and it might be worth persevering in the job search.

 

If not, any job you get is likely to be one where you're working illegally, putting up with crappy conditions and waiting for the axe to fall on you.

 

It is what it is mate, that's your situation.

Report Abuse
13 weeks 2 days ago
 
1
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

There's the laws, and then there's the 'marketability. Let me explain: Native English Speakers are the easiest to obtain permission to emply. As long as they have a degree and TEFL, and can obtain a Cert. of No Criminal Conviction, an employer has an almost guaranteed application to employ. 

For Non-native, it's variable, and changes case by case. If you obtained your degree in an English speaking country, it's possible to employ. If you have an Internationally recognised TEFL AND two years teaching in an English speaking country, it MAy be possible. If you have neither, you won't be employed as an English teacher. You MAY be employed under some other vague description if they have connections, but should anyone decide to look to closely, you'll be in a world of trouble.

So, Non-Native speakers CAN be employed, if employers want to - which leads onto marketability. Does an Employer WANT to go through the effort to employ you? Can they 'sell' you as an English teacher? With all apologies to my non-white brothers and sisters, if you're not white, they probably don't want to employ you if your not a Native English speaker. The parents just won't buy it. It's not fair, I'm possitive, and know from experience, that there are many, many non-white, non-native speakers who would make excellent ESL teachers. But though you and I know this, the parents don't. If you have an degree from an English speaking country, this can be put up on the Teacher's board, parents see you studied in the U.S.A. or where-ever, so schools can market you. If you obtained your degree from a non-English University, parents won't let you teach their kids. Sorry.

Basically, what I'm saying is it's up to the school to decide if they want the trouble of employing non-natives. Can you be marketed as a great English teacher? If this isn't the case I'd advise either working outside China. Because if you can't be marketed or employed legally as an English teacher, you're going to be in a bad position legally with whomever takes you on just to be a dancing monkey for a while.

Report Abuse
10 weeks 3 days ago
 
2
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
3

I ve the same problem.  Im thinking is not enough if you are the best preparations. I do not know what is happening with NON NATIVE SPEAKER ENGLISHHHHH

IT IS DISCRIMINATION I m sure!

icnif77:

'discrimination' how?

Your written English is discrimination ... of English language!

Employer doesn't want Non-Native English teachers ...

Labor law in China since 2017 prohibits employment of Non-native English passport holders as an English teachers!

It is no different in Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, S. Korea and other Asian countries, Russia, S. America, Schengen zone and so on.

 

Other side of (your) coin is:

 

"Your chosen profession is tough cookie to accomplish!" 

5 days 11 hours ago
Report Abuse

biggj123:

Why do they need non-native English teachers when a Chinese person could do the same job? English is their second language too. I would not expect anyone to hire me as a white Canadian guy to teach Chinese...Even though i can speak it somewhat...thats just how it is. There are some non-native speakers who can speak and understand English just as good as a native speaker.....but most cant....at all...Most Chinese English teachers can speak and understand English just as well as a non-native speaker. So why not just use the Chinese to do that job?

5 days 2 hours ago
Report Abuse

icnif77:

Most of Chinese English teachers cannot speak understandable English because of heavy accent and improper pronunciation.

Most Chinese English teachers have never been outside of China. How they can get proper sound of English language? ... By listening other Chinese teachers and 'wheel goes around ...'

Since, China will have 300 million English students by the next year, Chinese would be better off to hire Native English speakers to teach English to Chinese English teachers. 

However, my (nothing more than practical) idea since 2012 or so didn't get off the ground (Chinese approval) 'cause of 'face culture'.

None of the Chinese English teachers ever step into my classroom as an observer.

If I would be teacher of Chinese language, I wouldn't miss any class conducted by Native Chinese speaker/teacher.

 

4 days 20 hours ago
Report Abuse

biggj123:

I get what you're saying. I find there is not much a difference between non-native teachers language skill and a good Chinese teacher.They both have accents and both are usually not speaking English in their home countries. Of course there are exceptions...I do understand why the law is like that though.Most other Asian countries have the same rules around non-native English speakers when it comes to teaching English. I always thought they should develop some sort of national test you need to do in order to teach English...and that's for natives and non natives. I know they have TESOL and all that... but not so hard for anyone to get. And like you said China has so many people wanting to learn English there is not enough native teachers with bachelors degrees willing to teach English to fill the gap....so they need someone to file the gap. And most of the time they just go by how you look anyway...white black brown whatever. They just see that as foreign so they assume they must know. At he end of the day though for a non native English speaker to choose a career teaching English...I would think they should be either really devoted to teaching or be well versed in English...and from most of the ones I see in china...most are not. And that goes for natives English teachers too...most don't give a shit about teaching.

4 days 19 hours ago
Report Abuse
Report Abuse
5 days 11 hours ago
 
Posts: 1101

Governor

2
2
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

The one true roadblock to hiring non-native speakers of English isn't the Z-visa but the work permit. The Z-visa at the embassy is incredibly easy to obtain, there is virtually no check for as long you've got all the documents (passport, employment contract, application form, etc...)

 

Once you get to China and need to get the work permit is where the real problems begin. The Labor Administration Department (LAD) that delivers the work permit are going to scrutinize every documents you submit online and they are also going to take a real good look at your passport. The LAD are told not to give any work permit to teach if the applicant isn't from one of the Big 5 (USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand). There are ways around that, the Social Resources and Social Security Office (SRSS) can effectively 'force' the LAD to give you a work permit with a simple letter, but its assuming you or your employer know someone at said office in your city.

 

And then, even assuming that you get your work permit you'll need to go to the PSB and change your Z-visa (which is only valid for 30 days) into a resident permit, yet another roadblock. The PSB has the power to turn down your application if they estimate that you are not suitable for the job and not being a native speaker of English is one reason. In that case there is nothing the SASS can do to help you as the PSB is a higher authority.

Report Abuse
2 days 22 hours ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs