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Q: Z visa for non native English teachers??

I have a BA in English Language and literature and years of teaching experiences. I am trying to find a job as an English teacher in China and it seems impossible, everybody rejects my application just for not being a native!

I would like to know if there is any solution for this matter. 

Thanks 

4 weeks 3 days ago in  Visa & Legalities - China

 
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The more "high end" English schools most likely won't hire anyone non native or without the proper credentials. I'm sure you can find a job at some shit training center since they will take anyone who does not look Chinese and any form of education is not needed.. Point is...any place that requires you to have a work visa most likely won't and cant hire you legally. There are ways around it, but it's up to the school if they can pull some strings, but it's rare for that to happen anymore.

 

I had a friend from Greece who was teaching in China before the new laws came into effect. He had similar education as you. When he applied for his new work permit they only gave him 6 months and only because he was working before the law came. They said he would not be able to renew or get a new work permit after these 6 months...not for English teaching anyway.

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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One chance with legal employment (Z) for Non-native passport holder in China was (2017):

 

"If your degree was completed in Native English country ...", but I left China instead.

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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keep applying. ive met quite a few english teachers not from a native english speaking country. 

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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The more "high end" English schools most likely won't hire anyone non native or without the proper credentials. I'm sure you can find a job at some shit training center since they will take anyone who does not look Chinese and any form of education is not needed.. Point is...any place that requires you to have a work visa most likely won't and cant hire you legally. There are ways around it, but it's up to the school if they can pull some strings, but it's rare for that to happen anymore.

 

I had a friend from Greece who was teaching in China before the new laws came into effect. He had similar education as you. When he applied for his new work permit they only gave him 6 months and only because he was working before the law came. They said he would not be able to renew or get a new work permit after these 6 months...not for English teaching anyway.

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Yeah like Icnif said, if your degree was obtained in a native speaking country you're eligible for a visa, and it might be worth persevering in the job search.

 

If not, any job you get is likely to be one where you're working illegally, putting up with crappy conditions and waiting for the axe to fall on you.

 

It is what it is mate, that's your situation.

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4 weeks 3 days ago
 
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There's the laws, and then there's the 'marketability. Let me explain: Native English Speakers are the easiest to obtain permission to emply. As long as they have a degree and TEFL, and can obtain a Cert. of No Criminal Conviction, an employer has an almost guaranteed application to employ. 

For Non-native, it's variable, and changes case by case. If you obtained your degree in an English speaking country, it's possible to employ. If you have an Internationally recognised TEFL AND two years teaching in an English speaking country, it MAy be possible. If you have neither, you won't be employed as an English teacher. You MAY be employed under some other vague description if they have connections, but should anyone decide to look to closely, you'll be in a world of trouble.

So, Non-Native speakers CAN be employed, if employers want to - which leads onto marketability. Does an Employer WANT to go through the effort to employ you? Can they 'sell' you as an English teacher? With all apologies to my non-white brothers and sisters, if you're not white, they probably don't want to employ you if your not a Native English speaker. The parents just won't buy it. It's not fair, I'm possitive, and know from experience, that there are many, many non-white, non-native speakers who would make excellent ESL teachers. But though you and I know this, the parents don't. If you have an degree from an English speaking country, this can be put up on the Teacher's board, parents see you studied in the U.S.A. or where-ever, so schools can market you. If you obtained your degree from a non-English University, parents won't let you teach their kids. Sorry.

Basically, what I'm saying is it's up to the school to decide if they want the trouble of employing non-natives. Can you be marketed as a great English teacher? If this isn't the case I'd advise either working outside China. Because if you can't be marketed or employed legally as an English teacher, you're going to be in a bad position legally with whomever takes you on just to be a dancing monkey for a while.

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1 week 4 days ago
 
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