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Q: The 100 days crack down is a big disrespect to the foreigner??

7 years 12 weeks ago in  Arts & Entertainment - Beijing

 
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Not for me it isnt.  It is a pain in  the neck having to carry the whole passport all the time, and they make the covers of such crappy material that it starts to frey. Then Homeland Sec busts my chops because the passport looks ratty.

But, I do believe that all countries have the right to decide who will enter and who will not and for them to take appropriate action to those who do not enter by legal means or overstay, be it here or be it back home.

So, to answer your question, no.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
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From my point of view, it is not.  And basically it is because of two reasons :

 

1.- Foremost, I am a guest here.  This is not my country, so they have the perfect right to set whatever rules they want for foreigners to follow, and us have the perfect right to follow them or if in disagreement with any, leave.  They are cracking down on illegal immigrants, illegal workers, etc.  If I am stopped, and I show my passport and Registration of Temporary residence by visitor's form, within 5 minutes I am free to go.  So, in what way is that disrespectful ?.

 

2.- Since I enjoy, value and respect China, I always comply with its Laws and regulations.

So, if asked to provide my passport and required documentation, I have no problem doing so.  I do not work illegally, I do not overstay my visa, so I have no wporrie at all.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
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While every country has the right to say who can and cannot enter the country, it is the method that is the problem. Simply stopping people on the street who look like foreigners and demanding to see their passport is wrong. In the states we call it "racial profiling" and it is racism, plan and simple.

 

I admit, I'm not too vocal about the issue because I don't live in Beijing and I don't plan on visiting any time soon so basically it doesn't affect me, but I should be (as should all foreigners). If I lived there, the hassle of having to carry my passport, the dangers of carrying my passport (such a high risk of it getting lost or stolen),  and the inconvenience of being stopped randomly or multiple times would get very old very quickly. Not to mention the bad press this gives China for treating tourists this way during peak travel season seems like a bad PR move. Also what is stopping this policy from spreading to all the tier 1 cities, and then the tier 2's? 

 

So, long story short - yes it is offensive.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 2021

Peasant

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No , i don't think so its disrespect to foreigners because every country got their own rules and regulations and they are jus cleaning those who are illegal in china and china got this right to clean those who are illegal here so i don't think its disrespect to foreigners

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 277

Governor

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That crackdown really shamed me. I'm devastated.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
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What it is is useless. Checking some random foreigner on the street and seeing he has an L visa means nothing. Unless the cops KNOW that he is also working with that visa what is the point? 

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
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Ueless or not, it's their country, they make the rules and visitors need to abide by them. Perhaps their isn't enough crime to keep the Police busy, so they needed something for them to do or whatever. 

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
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Aroberts. 

You see mountains out of ant hills.  And to call me a "racist" is just plain BS.  And last, to clism "if this would happen in the states ....." just indicates how far off reality you exist.  This has happened in USA, and almost in any country on this Earth forf centuries.  Discrimination of majorities towards minorities happens everywhere, every day.  And I have suffered it,

When was the last time you filled an application within the USA  ? .   Have you noticed where they ask your "RACE" that they list a bunch of selections that bears no relationship to any recognized race ?.  Race is caucasian, not white, not hispanic minority, not Latino, not anglo-mexican, etc.

Read the news and you will see profiling done every day within USA and many other countries. 

The target of this crackdown is all foreigners, not only US Citizens.  If it was directed only to US citizens then I would be offended and feel real bad, and will make noise about it.  But it is directed to those breaking the Laws and Regulations of China, and ALL FOREIGNERS, and that is within their rights as a country.  So, I am not offended if asked for my papers.  But if I am handcuffed, placed in a patrol car, taken to jail for several days, and then asked for my passport, I will be very pissed !.

And yes, some get their passport stolen, but it is because they are careless.  Men may carry it in their back pockets, women in their purses.  But if you know that a thief will automatically go for that, why do it ?.  I do know many foreigners here who have carried their passports with them for years, and none had it stolen.  But they came up with clever ways of doing it to avoid pickpockets. 

And the very few that I know who lost it or got it stolen, in less than a month and with a few kuai they had a new one.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 9197

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This is not quite the same , but when I was young (I'm white) I could pretty much count  that any cop that saw me would pull me over to check me out, then probably give me a ticket for something I didn't do. Then I started running them, they quit bothering me after awhile. Moral of the story, never drive anything stock. 

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 44

Governor

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Here's something lacking respect:

 

http://english.sina.com/z/20120516foreigner/index.shtml

 

English Sina actually made a website specifically dedicated for 'decent foreigners'. This is really getting out of hand.

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 149

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Its like most countries .....follow our laws .....if you don't like it leave    at least here they don't force you to speak the language  here    stop whinnying so big deal you have to carry your Passport.....how hard is that......................

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 961

Shifu

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"Foreigners entering and exiting the Chinese mainland in 2010 totaled 52.11 million, a 133 percent increase on 2001. The number last year was 54.12 million"

 

So in the last few weeks we have had a attempted rape (if true throw the book at this tool in the same way that you would for a local who bashes and sexually assaults his wife) and the heinous crime of a pissed cellist putting his feet on a seat back and dropping a few F Bombs. 

 

And from that we get to.

 

"Foreign scumbags should go back to their countries. China is not the place for them to do everything they want,"

 

and

 

"The public security bureau wants to clean out the foreign trash. To arrest foreign thugs and protect innocent girls, they need to focus on the disaster areas of Wudaokou (a student area) and Sanlitun (a bar area). Cut off the traffickers, including those who can't find jobs in the US and Europe that come to China to take money, engage themselves in human trafficking and illegal immigration. Identify foreign spies, who live with Chinese women while collecting intelligence and GPS information for Japan, South Korea, the United States and European countries while holding a tourist visa. That foreign bitch has been expelled and closed Al-Jazeera's Beijing bureau. We should kick out those who demonize China."

 

Some people and I hope it is only a small minority in China really do lack logic. 

 

Would love to compare the crime figures per 50 million Chinese nationals to that of 50 million foreign nationals. I know which one I would put my money on to come out the better behaved. 

 

  

 

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7 years 12 weeks ago
 
Posts: 100

Governor

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crack down on what?

 

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7 years 10 weeks ago
 
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Yes, it is offensive if it's done on the streets - and not in a suspected illegal workplace. Random checks on the streets is insulting and disrespectful... if it's done in a school or similar to crackdown on those working illegally, then fine - cos that's what it's  supposed to be about!

 

Happy - the argument of "this is their country, we should follow their rules" is BS!!! Now, normally, in most countries, I wouldn't say that... but TIC - where it seems following the law is immoral. That person checking your passport... pay a few hundred kuai, and you're ok. The guy in immigration - give him a nice bottle of wine, and you get your passport renewed... that politician? It's MANDATORY that s/he be corrupt to get to where they are.

 

So, expecting someone to respect the laws of a country that virtually NO-ONE in that country does is complete BS!!! Why should I be expected to follow the laws of the country when they don't?

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7 years 9 weeks ago
 
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They should have planned stings and make it look cool.

 

Getting stopped on the street may cause some commotion,,, why would they want that?........ oh wait.

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7 years 9 weeks ago
 
Posts: 218

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It could be disrespectful if police 'abused' the intent and began walking about demanding every foreigner quickly satisfied the paperwork, even on any street corner at any time. 

But this doesn't seem to be the case. They aren't running around Tiananmen square demanding instant ID from everyone or going door-to-door through hotels. 

However, I DO understand how they might need to simply (and politely) start double-checking people who give some reason for inquiry. An African who has been in a market selling goods for a very long time. Western 'back-packers' who appear to have been traveling for quite a few months.

               And it can be done politely and without 'hassle'. Give them easy time to deliver documents should they have none on their person. 

Wise police are also helpful to say something like this "Excuse us, we are just doing some safety checks as the 'routine' now.".

No, I do not feel disrespected in that case. (maybe if it happens daily I'd be annoyed) but China has every right to maintain its borders, set its rules of visitation and also deport those who have over-stayed visas. 

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7 years 9 weeks ago
 
Posts: 1134

Shifu

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its really not they have an obligation to up hold the laws of their country unlike the us where illigals are filling the welfare lines prisons and hospitols

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7 years 9 weeks ago
 
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