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Common folk

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Q: can foreigners still go to hong kong and come back?

6 days 2 hours ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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General

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https://hk.usconsulate.gov/covid-19-information/

 

I don't know for sure, but this is what the Consulate says...

 

On June 2, the Hong Kong government announced that it will extend the following in-bound travel restrictions:

  • Until at least September 18, all non-Hong Kong residents arriving by air from any location other than mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan will be denied entry. Non-Hong Kong residents arriving from mainland China, Macau, or Taiwan will be denied entry if they have been to any overseas countries and regions in the past 14 days.
  • Until at least July 7, Hong Kong residents and non-Hong Kong residents arriving from mainland China, Macau, or Taiwan with no travel to any overseas countries and regions in the past 14 days will be subject to a 14-day compulsory quarantine.
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5 days 8 hours ago
 
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Emperor

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it depends on what you do there.........

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6 days 45 min ago
 
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https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/china-approves-hong-kong-national...

 

Chinese President Xi Signs National Security Law For Hong Kong

Tue, 06/30/2020 - 07:26

 

China's top legislative body passed, and president Xi signed, a new controversial law for Hong Kong that would allow authorities to crack down on pro-democracy protesters and "foreign forces" who attempt to destabilize the semi-autonomous region, reported Reuters. The National People's Congress Standing Committee swiftly approved the landmark national security law on Tuesday, signaling Communist Party leader Xi Jinping's desire to seize more control to squash pro-democracy protests in the city to stop subversion, terrorism, separatism, and collusion with external forces. 

 

The new law could jeopardize civil liberties and Hong Kong's independent judicial system, which has allowed the financial hub to thrive over the decades economically. President Donald Trump warned he would disband Hong Kong's preferential trade status - and in response to the passage of the law in the overnight hours - Washington released a headline indicating it will bar the export of weapons and sensitive technology to the city.

The most significant penalty under the new law is life imprisonment - something that will likely deter protesters from organizing on city streets.

Sure enough, famous HK pro-democracy protester Joshua Wong tweeted: "It [new law] marks the end of Hong Kong that the world knew before." Conversely, Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam told the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva that the international community must "respect our country's right to safeguard national security."

The international condemnation to the passage was swift: British Foreign Minister Dominic Raab said he was "deeply concerned by unconfirmed reports that Beijing has passed the national security law." Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga described the passage of the national security law as "regrettable."

On Monday, a diplomatic tit-for-tat with the US, China announced it would impose visa restrictions on US government officials who "behave egregiously" in connection to Hong Kong affairs. This followed Washington's decision last week to restrict visas for Chinese government officials who threaten Hong Kong's autonomy.

The new security law and tit-for-tat visa restrictions come as tensions between Beijing and Washington are soaring over trade deal purchase commitments, origins of the virus pandemic, and territory disputes in the South China Sea.

icnif77:

  •  

New HK Law Includes Penalties Of Life In Prison & 'Closed' Trials To Protect "State Secrets"

Newly published official text of law explicitly denies independent oversight, giving Beijing full power of interpretation over conditions of its application.  Currently the US, Britain, and European countries are pouring through it, readying a reaction. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Tuesday that the law's contents will determine Britain's next step.

“Despite the urging of the international community, Beijing has chosen not to step back from imposing this legislation,” Raab said in a statement. “China has ignored its international obligations regarding Hong Kong. This is a grave step, which is deeply troubling. We urgently need to see the full legislation, and will use that to determine whether there has been a breach of the Joint Declaration and what further action the UK will take.”

 

5 days 29 min ago
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5 days 19 hours ago
 
Posts: 339

Soldier

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Anecdotally, I have heard that if you exit the mainland that your visa is cancelled immediately so doing a visa run seems doubtful.

Note: this is hearsay. Going to the entey/exit department in the city where you registered with the police would yield accurate information and may even eliminate the need for a visa run. Who knows?

icnif77:

One's Embassy in China would most likely have an updated info on exit&reentry.

However, Sorrel has a point above ...

 

"... it depends what you do in HK ..." 

5 days 19 hours ago
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icnif77:

https://www.2paxfly.com/2020/05/26/hong-kong-international-airport-open-for-transit-passengers/

 

Towards the end of the weekly press briefing, Hong Kong Chief Executive, Carrie Lam announced that Hong Kong International Airport is open to transit passengers from 1 June, although Hong Kong’s borders are still closed to international travellers.

 

https://simpleflying.com/hong-kong-travel-ban/

 

Hong Kong is extending its travel ban for non-residents as it keeps up its efforts to contain COVID-19. This travel ban also extends the suspension of transit flights until further notice, which has been a devastating blow to its main carrier, Cathay Pacific. The Chinese special administrative region has seen a surge of coronavirus infections in the city.

 

https://www.nowshenzhen.com/ferry/what-borders-between-shenzhen-and-hong-kong-are-open/

 

5 days 11 hours ago
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5 days 19 hours ago
 
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Short answer: No. You can only transit through Hong Kong at the moment.

 

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5 days 13 hours ago
 
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Not all ... foreigners ... can visit HK ... 'cause of 'tit-for-tit ' .. 

 

Rabobank: Every Member Of Congress Is Now Open To Arrest If They Visit Hong Kong

The bill also states any foreign financial institution that conduct “significant transactions” with anyone in the Hong Kong government or the National People’s Congress (NPC) will be cut off from the US financial system...

 

Around 12 hours after publication came news that the White House plans to proceed with “harsh” Magnitsky sanctions against members of the Chinese Communist Party it sees as responsible for human rights abuses in Xinjiang. That decision may have been prompted by the US seizure yesterday of a cargo of 11.8 tonnes of human hair for wig-making which it alleges may have been sourced from “re-education” centres in Xinjiang holding ethnic Muslim populations: the US does not seem to believe Uighurs are all being taught hair-dressing. Beijing has already made clear it will be furious if this occurs: could it perhaps go so far as to target US firms in response?

Yet within hours that threat was eclipsed by the unanimous passage by the US House of Representatives of the bill already passed in the Senate to impose mandatory Magnitsky sanctions on Chinese banks who do business with officials implementing Hong Kong’s new national security law. Constitutionally, the Senate now needs to pass the bill again, which it appears will take no time at all given the sentiment in DC, and it then goes to President Trump with a veto-proof majority behind it - meaning it WILL become law. Perhaps even as soon as this this week, but certainly in the not-too-distant future. Underlining the present political dynamic, each member of Congress has, in all likelihood, broken said Hong Kong law by their actions and could technically be open to arrest if they were to visit.

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3 days 16 hours ago
 
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A: Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were loo
A:Going to HK would be the best bet I reckon, especially if you were looking for a church wedding. Chinese weddings are pretty grim IMO - you go to a barren govt dept with souless officials and navigate red tape so some guy can give you a red stamp and a marriage book. You get expensive pictures taken of you both posing in places you'd never go to in everyday life that is somehow supposed to represent your wedding, then a while later it's off to a restaurant where a game show host kind of guy makes sure it's as tacky as possible while the guests eat as fast as they can so they can leave as soon as they finish eating and gave you money. Hell, I'd go to Thailand or the Philippines and get married in Paradise.   -- Stiggs