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Q: How is the "Wolf Warrior" diplomacy campaign working out?

It appears that everyone here is proud of diplomats being aggressive towards basically everything while the world struggles to deal with this pandemic.

I always thought you caught more flies with honey and the carrot came before the stick. What would I know?

11 weeks 2 days ago in  Relationships - China

 
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One thing I've taken away from this covid thing is that all those stupid Hollywood movies where some catastrophe is threatening earth so all the leaders unite and work together to defeat the threat and everyone lives happily ever after... yeah they're nonsense.

 

Apparently what happens is the situation devolves into a clash of the buck passing, face saving, blame diverting egos.

 

If this virus decides to go Spanish flu on us and come back mutated and more lethal and the same clowns are still running this shitshow we're all rooted.

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11 weeks 2 days ago
 
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https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/3085948/will-chinas-ca...

Will China’s calls for more ‘Wolf Warriors’ leave country’s diplomats feeling sheepish?

*The country’s foreign minister and ambassador to Britain have backed the combative approach, but observers warn it may only alienate the rest of the world. Foreign Minister Wang Yi backed the “wolf warriors” in a press conference on Sunday.

*Meanwhile, state-owned tabloid Global Times argues that the label is better applied to US diplomacy.

Published: 4:59pm, 25 May, 2020

Senior Chinese diplomats have called for more “Wolf Warriors” to defend the country abroad despite warnings that this combative approach was likely to alienate the rest of the world.

On Sunday Foreign Minister Wang Yi defended this combative approach – named after a series of nationalistic action movies – saying that China would fight back against “slanders” and “firmly defend national honour and dignity”.

“We will lay out the truth to counter gratuitous smears and resolutely maintain fairness and justice and conscience,” Wang said.

Wang also insisted that China had no desire to lord it over the world no matter what state of development it reached, saying “those who go out of their way to label China a hegemon are precisely the ones who refuse to let go of their hegemonic status”.

The article, published on Sunday evening with the headline: “Wolf Warrior diplomacy a US trait”, concluded: “Labelling Chinese diplomacy as ‘Wolf Warrior’ reflects an extreme ideology.”

But observers warned that no matter how much China tried to justify its more aggressive approach to diplomacy, it was likely to backfire.

Foreign Minister Wang Yi backed the “wolf warriors” in a press conference on Sunday. Photo: XinhuaForeign Minister Wang Yi backed the “wolf warriors” in a press conference on Sunday.

The country’s foreign minister and ambassador to Britain have backed the combative approach, but observers warn it may only alienate the rest of the world
Meanwhile, state-owned tabloid Global Times argues that the label is better applied to US diplomacy

Senior Chinese diplomats have called for more “Wolf Warriors” to defend the country abroad despite warnings that this combative approach was likely to alienate the rest of the world.
On Sunday Foreign Minister Wang Yi defended this combative approach – named after a series of nationalistic action movies – saying that China would fight back against “slanders” and “firmly defend national honour and dignity”.

“We will lay out the truth to counter gratuitous smears and resolutely maintain fairness and justice and conscience,” Wang said.
Wang also insisted that China had no desire to lord it over the world no matter what state of development it reached, saying “those who go out of their way to label China a hegemon are precisely the ones who refuse to let go of their hegemonic status”.

Wang’s comments were echoed by Liu Xiaoming, the outspoken ambassador to Britain, who has previously clashed with TV journalists when defending the country.

“Some people said China now has many Wolf Warriors’, the reason is that there are many ‘wolves’ out there in the world now. If there are ‘wolves’, we must have ‘Wolf Warriors’ to fight,” Liu told state broadcaster CCTV.
“We encourage diplomats at all levels to actively fight. Where there is a ‘wolf’, we need to fight back actively to protect national dignity and interests.”

But Liu said diplomats should still bear in mind that they need to make the general public in other countries understand that China is a country that wants cooperation and values friendship and truth.

Wang and Liu did not explicitly state who they thought was “smearing” or “slandering” the country, but an editorial in Global Times, a state-owned tabloid, said the United States was more wolf-like than China.

“In terms of ‘Wolf Warrior’, the US has peaked in its diplomacy. Just look at how many countries are being sanctioned by the US, in how many places is the US stationing its troops and how many countries’ internal affairs are being interfered with by the US,” the editorial said.

Too soon, too loud: foreign policy advisers tell ‘Wolf Warrior’ diplomats to tone it down

Fergus Ryan, an analyst from Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said that both Xi Jinping and Donald Trump’s attitudes affected diplomats’ behaviour.

“Ultimately, there’s only one person in the Chinese system whose opinion on this aggressive style of diplomacy matters, and that’s Xi Jinping.

“Another key factor is rising hostility from the United States towards China which is helping to accelerate the shift towards a truculent approach to foreign affairs,” said Ryan, who argued that to some extent Chinese diplomats were copying the US president’s own belligerent tone.
“Beijing will continue its pugnacious tone if the approach helps to achieve its diplomatic objectives. But it’s more likely that these displays of aggressive nationalism will only serve to drive the world further away from China,” Ryan said.

Foreign Minister Wang Yi backed the “wolf warriors” in a press conference on Sunday.

Will China’s calls for more ‘Wolf Warriors’ leave country’s diplomats feeling sheepish?
The country’s foreign minister and ambassador to Britain have backed the combative approach, but observers warn it may only alienate the rest of the world

Senior Chinese diplomats have called for more “Wolf Warriors” to defend the country abroad despite warnings that this combative approach was likely to alienate the rest of the world.
On Sunday Foreign Minister Wang Yi defended this combative approach – named after a series of nationalistic action movies – saying that China would fight back against “slanders” and “firmly defend national honour and dignity”.
“We will lay out the truth to counter gratuitous smears and resolutely maintain fairness and justice and conscience,” Wang said.
Wang also insisted that China had no desire to lord it over the world no matter what state of development it reached, saying “those who go out of their way to label China a hegemon are precisely the ones who refuse to let go of their hegemonic status”.

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11 weeks 1 day ago
 
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OT: 

 

"Like It Was Designed To Infect Humans": COVID-19 'Cell Culture' Theory Gains Steam

"You would expect it to have lower-binding to human cells than to the original host animal."

 

 

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I think there is a fundamental misunderstanding of how things work elsewhere.... I appears their view of international relations is deeply flawed and conspiratorial.

The claim that HK protests are controlled by CIA is likely genuinely believed. They are so used to a submissive population that they can't imagine mass action being taken spontaneously from the grassroots, as almost everything in China is manipulated by the Party in some way. They can't conceive of other ways of being.

Similarly, they believe that allies of the US are secretly controlled by the US like puppet states.

Their attempts at infiltration and economic coercion make a lot more sense when you think that this is how they imagine US power functions. For example, the UK's recent u-turn on Huawei was ultimately caused by the pandemic strengthening the hand of rebel Tory MPs who had always opposed Huawei, and now seeing China threaten to cut off medical supplies and threatening a trade boycott against Australia for supporting an inquiry. But Chinese media reported it as entirely down to US pressure - this was a factor in removing Huawei from key parts of infrastructure (otherwise they would lose intelligence sharing within the Five Eyes) but was nothing to do with the decision to remove Huawei outright. I had a conversation with a Wumao pretending to be a Russian here the other day, and it was interested how much he struggled to conceive of the Cold War as anything other than a great power conflict between USSR and a western European "occupied" by the US. Even Soviet propaganda never claimed that France, the UK, Netherlands or Italy were puppets of the USA, and the suggestion is really quite laughable.

They don't believe in multilateral alliances based on common interests and non-state cultural links and person to person connections. To them, every partnership has a superior and an inferior. Therefore, to replace the US they think they just need to be more forceful than the US in economic manipulation and to show their teeth, and then people will obey them.

Unfortunately, they fail to see that American allies might be allies because it happens to serve their interests, and also because they trust the US to be relatively hands off. They assume that US influence over allies is a combination of threats, infiltration, and economic carrot / stick. That might be a part of it but they are willfully blind to how US allies are a) not slaves to the US and b) cooperate with the US only when it is in their interests. Threatening people's sovereignty and trying to bully and demean small countries who don't toe the line isn't going to convince them that cooperation with China is in their long term interests, even if there are short term gains.

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11 weeks 1 day ago
 
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You're watching too much Cross Roads on Youtube my friend.

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11 weeks 18 hours ago
 
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https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/china-its-own-worst-enemy

 

Excerpt:

 

Make no mistake: the world will not be the same after this wartime-like crisis. Future historians will regard the pandemic as a turning point that helped to reshape global politics and restructure vital production networks. Indeed, the crisis has made the world wake up to the potential threats stemming from China’s grip on many global supply chains, and moves are already afoot to loosen that control.

More fundamentally, Xi’s actions highlight how political institutions that bend to the whim of a single, omnipotent individual are prone to costly blunders. China’s diplomatic and information offensive to obscure facts and deflect criticism of its COVID-19 response may be only the latest example of its brazen use of censure and coercion to browbeat other countries. But it represents a watershed moment.

 

In the past, China’s reliance on persuasion secured its admission to international institutions like the World Trade Organization and helped to power its economic rise. But under Xi, spreading disinformation, exercising economic leverage, flexing military muscle, and running targeted influence operations have become China’s favorite tools for getting its way. Diplomacy serves as an adjunct of the Communist Party’s propaganda apparatus.

Xi’s approach is alienating other countries, in the process jeopardizing their appetite for Chinese-made goods, scaring away investors, and accentuating China’s image problem. 

Negative views of China and its leadership among Americans have reached a record high. Major economies such as Japan and the US are offering firms relocation subsidies as an incentive to shift production out of China. And India’s new rule requiring prior government approval of any investment from China is the first of its kind.

China currently faces the most daunting international environment since it began opening up in the late 1970s, and now it risks suffering lasting damage to its image and interests. A boomerang effect from Xi’s overreach seems inevitable. A pandemic that originated in China will likely end up weakening the country’s global position and hamstringing its future growth. In this sense, the hollowing out of Hong Kong’s autonomy in the shadow of COVID-19 could prove to be the proverbial straw that breaks the Chinese camel’s back.

     

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    11 weeks 11 hours ago
     
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    China Defies Trump, Approves New Security Law Stripping Hong Kong Of Its Freedoms

      Beijing will initiate a far-reaching 'crackdown' to impose the new law on Hong Kong once it takes effect in September.

       

       

      Thu, 05/28/2020 - 07:06

      One day after the US declared that Hong Kong is no longer "autonomous" from Beijing, China's Politburo Standing Committee on Thursday officially wove a controversial new "National Security" resolution that was approved during last week's National Party Congress into Hong Kong's 'Basic Law' - the de facto constitution left by the British - in defiance of President Trump, and a broader backlash across the West, which has repeatedly stood up to defend Hong Kong's freedoms.

      According to the NYT, Beijing will probably initiate a far-reaching 'crackdown' to impose the new law on Hong Kong once it takes effect in September.

      Activist groups could be banned. Courts could impose long jail sentences for national security violations. China’s feared security agencies could operate openly in the city.

      As we reported last night, losing its 'special status' conferred by the US could strip Hong Kong of its 'international city' designation. As one expert said, Beijing no longer cares about "killing the golden goose" - that is, closing what has been for decades a critical portal to the West and the global financial system.

      It's still unclear how many of Hong Kong's freedoms Beijing intends to strip away: this won't become clear until later in the year.

      Per the NYT, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam appeared to hint that certain civil liberties might not be an enduring feature of Hong Kong life. "We are a very free society, so for the time being, people have the freedom to say whatever they want to say," said the chief executive, Carrie Lam, noting, "Rights and freedoms are not absolute."

      Though US equity futures pointed to a higher open again on Thursday, analysts cautioned that the growing tensions could trigger a massive "risk off" move in markets in the situation escalates. Pictet’s Luca Paolini said on Bloomberg Television that markets seem to be ignoring this because they're assuming it's just rhetoric.

      "For now it’s just words, but if the escalation takes place it’s the worst possible time to have this kind of escalation considering the global economy continues to be incredibly weak," Paolini said.

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      10 weeks 6 days ago
       
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      China's cave man mentality ...

       

          China’s shameless reaction to protests

      Burning cars and riot police in the U.S. featured on front pages around the globe, but it was China’s response that has made headlines.   

       

       

      In China, the protests are being viewed through the prism of U.S. government criticism of China’s crackdown on anti-government protests in Hong Kong. Hu Xijin, the editor of the state-owned Global Times newspaper, tweeted that U.S. officials can now see protests out their own windows: “I want to ask Speaker Pelosi and Secretary Pompeo: Should Beijing support protests in the U.S., like you glorified rioters in Hong Kong?”

      Hua Chunying, a Chinese Foreign ministry spokeswoman, pointed out America’s racial unrest by tweeting “I can’t breathe,” which Floyd said before his death.

       

      ... would never look through the prism "Chinese, we are breaking up the promise given/signed at UN before the HK's handover ... in 1997 ..."

       

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handover_of_Hong_Kong

      In the Joint Declaration, the People's Republic of China Government stated that it had decided to resume the exercise of sovereignty over Hong Kong (including Hong Kong Island, Kowloon, and the New Territories) with effect from 1 July 1997 and the United Kingdom Government declared that it would restore Hong Kong to the PRC with effect from 1 July 1997. In the document, the People's Republic of China Government also declared its basic policies regarding Hong Kong.

      In accordance with the "One country, two systems" principle agreed between the United Kingdom and the People's Republic of China, the socialist system of the People's Republic of China would not be practised in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR), and Hong Kong's previous capitalist system and its way of life would remain unchanged for a period of 50 years. This would have left Hong Kong unchanged until 2047.

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      10 weeks 3 days ago
       
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