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Q: Like to rent a country house with some land to grow vegges. Anyone try that before?

5 years 4 weeks ago in  Housing - Harbin

 
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Yes, I lived in Fuk., Xinjiang in big 3-bedroom bottom floor apartment with some 5 x 10 m garden. Garden was also 2nd apartment's exit.

Bottom apartments in China don't have real value, because living on the bottom floor is 'face lost'. Chinese are also aware, they'll get all garbage from the apartments above thrown to their garden, what I find it slightly inconvenient. 

I had big sign by my door bell written in characters: 'Please, don't throw garbage over the balcony!', buTT....to no avail.

So, I had to design 'lesson plan' for residents above me in my apartment building: 'I emptied full trash bag with loads of kitchen's organic waste in front of the entrance of 4 apartments above me.'

Then, my Contract came to an end, and I had to move. I wasn't able to 'review' my lesson.

Other bottom apartment owners all build roof over their garden, and plant veggies under the roof. I think, that's almost 'indoor grow' by Cali standards.

My bottom apartment neighbour was crafty Han man: 'He planted water melon in his garden, and then moved whole end-thing to my garden, so watermelon grew in my garden, which was empty at the time.'

Something similar happened in Sprat-telies.

Maybe I'm wrong, just 'cause I'm not really into International Law.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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Yes, I lived in Fuk., Xinjiang in big 3-bedroom bottom floor apartment with some 5 x 10 m garden. Garden was also 2nd apartment's exit.

Bottom apartments in China don't have real value, because living on the bottom floor is 'face lost'. Chinese are also aware, they'll get all garbage from the apartments above thrown to their garden, what I find it slightly inconvenient. 

I had big sign by my door bell written in characters: 'Please, don't throw garbage over the balcony!', buTT....to no avail.

So, I had to design 'lesson plan' for residents above me in my apartment building: 'I emptied full trash bag with loads of kitchen's organic waste in front of the entrance of 4 apartments above me.'

Then, my Contract came to an end, and I had to move. I wasn't able to 'review' my lesson.

Other bottom apartment owners all build roof over their garden, and plant veggies under the roof. I think, that's almost 'indoor grow' by Cali standards.

My bottom apartment neighbour was crafty Han man: 'He planted water melon in his garden, and then moved whole end-thing to my garden, so watermelon grew in my garden, which was empty at the time.'

Something similar happened in Sprat-telies.

Maybe I'm wrong, just 'cause I'm not really into International Law.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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I'm hoping to do that this year. A couple of problems. Most village houses don't have gardens attached. The houses are built close together and then all the growing land is used for crops. 

 

The bigger problem is police registration. Us foreigners are supposed to live in gated apartment complexes for our "safety". I won't be looking into this again until maybe March as my wife and I have found a lovely village, on an island, with cheap annual rent. We're going to have another look around after CNY and also ask at the local police station about any rules about foreigners living there. 

 

Main sure it can be done, just need to work out how. 

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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I'm planning on renting a house this year, there is a new development here in Foshan, very close from the downtown and biggest entertainment/shopping area where they are rebuilding an "old" city which is also used as a shopping/restaurants area:

http://dlimg.focus.cn/upload/photos/5293/Tn4RociC.jpg

http://imglf2.ph.126.net/BbXq_Qa8X1_YUFHPZ7QnYg==/6597289668983939405.jpg

 

And next to it they are just done building these houses:

http://src.house.sina.com.cn/imp/imp/deal/05/53/b/fc42b38b469520e233888d...

http://img4.cache.netease.com/house/2010/6/30/20100630080328d9af9.jpg

 

Yeah sure they are next to each other but they all have a small garden like this one:

http://img8.soufunimg.com/agents/2014_11/17/M01/00/8A/wKgEQVRp2zOIPsc6AA...

 

The houses have three floors, roughly 500sqm including walls. The "old" city area itself is rather busy but the houses area is a gated community so no one but residents can come in. Not sure whether I will grow veggies yet but it's a nice area anyway.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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i am finding country houses (old time) 15/20 min outside of Harbin for 6000 to 9000rmb a year.
They all have a small area for growing stuff, i am still looking for one with a half acer or so.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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well harbin is cheap. but you have to consider it is quite cold .and you cant farm regularly. try Chongming island near shanghai. you can buy the land and farm. also a good place for fish farming.

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5 years 4 weeks ago

The world is a canvas so paint what you like.

 
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I live in a nice place in Dongguan with a big garden, Nice to sit out in and relax, rented it so my dogs would have a place to play. But growing stuff is pretty difficult as the soil is absolutely awful, grass even had trouble growing at the start.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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I live in a nice place in Dongguan with a big garden, Nice to sit out in and relax, rented it so my dogs would have a place to play. But growing stuff is pretty difficult as the soil is absolutely awful, grass even had trouble growing at the start.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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If you're in the countryside around Harbin you'll need a big heating plan.  The temp is similar where I live and houses outside apartment blocks just burn coal to keep from freezing.

Hotwater seems to have the idea...somewhere near the water down in the semi-tropics.

I would like to so similar but not in China.  Philippines sounds nice but wife not keen b/c she thinks they don't like Chinese.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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I am in Acheng a town of 600,000. I dont really care to live there. I have a nice apartment in town (2400rmb for heat a yr). I do want enough land to grow stuff for the family. My father-in-law will stay there when we are growing things. Just need to find a place.

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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You should specify "unpolluted land"

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5 years 4 weeks ago
 
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