The place to ask China-related questions!
Beijing Shanghai Guangzhou Shenzhen Chengdu Xi'an Hangzhou Qingdao Dalian Suzhou Nanjing More Cities>>

Categories

Close
Welcome to eChinacities Answers! Please or register if you wish to join conversations or ask questions relating to life in China. For help, click here.
Posts: 7206

Emperor

5
6
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

Q: Who will win the trade war?

I can see both sides here... and I sort of agree with Trump.

But who will win?

1 year 8 weeks ago in  Business & Jobs - China

 
Highest Voted
3
4
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/08/17/china-economic-nationalism-success-trump-trade-war-tariff-column/925385002/

 

if tariffs dont work, why has it worked for 25 years in China, Indeed. someone is finally using intelligence instead of political bullshit talking points.

Report Abuse
39 weeks 3 days ago
 
Answers (26 - 38 of 38)
Comments (83)
Posts: 15407

Emperor

1
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1
  •  

Trump To Announce $200 Billion In New China Tariffs As Soon As Monday

Trump plans to announce new tariffs on up to $200 billion in Chinese goods as soon as Monday in a move that will prompt an immediate retaliation from China, and may lead to a sharply lower futures open on Sunday night.

  • 110
  • 33395
  • Sep 15, 2018 10:50 PM

 

Report Abuse
35 weeks 3 days ago
 
1
2
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/politics/article/2164777/donald-trump-threatens-slap-tariffs-virtually-all-chinese-goods

 

Should have done this the first day in office and the dust would be clear now and we could move on to other problems.

Report Abuse
34 weeks 3 days ago
 
Posts: 7206

Emperor

0
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
1

From watching US news and Trump rallys, it is clear that most trumpsters think the tarrifs are something the Chinese Governement have to pay the US Government. They have no clue that it is the importers who pay it. And ultimately the consumers. Its a stealth tax.

Report Abuse
33 weeks 4 days ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0
Report Abuse
33 weeks 1 day ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://www.scmp.com/economy/china-economy/article/2166702/china-threatened-isolation-veto-written-us-mexico-canada-trade

 

Interesting times

 

So China can't ship a car into Canada and put one bolt on the car and then import it to America to avoid tariff and import laws anymore.

 

The parts 75 percent must be made in Mexico,US. and Canada.

 

45 percent of labor must be above 16 dollars an hour for the workers, this will raise wages in Mexico to keep people from migrating and increase labor taxes to all 3 governments.

 

Not a great deal, but certainly a good start.

Report Abuse
33 weeks 1 day ago
 
Posts: 7206

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

And now its escalating to grey bathtubs on a pond.

Couple of things here.

I am not against trade protectionism, and I agree with the tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminium. I suspect rare earths are not tarriffed.

Trump is doing this the wrong way. Its the companies that outsourse that should be targeted For example, raise the cash repatriation tax instead of reducing it. Or do the minimum wage thing that they have just done for NAFTA automotive trade. Excellent idea.

I have always been a great believer in the socialist concept of a company having a world wide minimum wage. Who would have thought Republicans would agree.

But imagine if all foreign companies had to pay a minimum of 15 bucks an hour here. Imagine the bribary and corruption to get such a job.

Report Abuse
33 weeks 1 hour ago
 
Posts: 7206

Emperor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/10/03/winning-trump-beats-...

Interesting. It seems the anti big government crowd are heading left.

No need to click the link to get the meaning... right wing is for high minimum wage.

I thought it was a bernie bill that shamed Bezos.

Anyway. The Trump admin wants mexican workers paid 15 bucks an hour, Bezos will pay American workers 15 bucks an hour...

Will Chinese Amazon suppliers follow?

Good result if they do.

Report Abuse
33 weeks 5 min ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

China is resorting to propaganda tooting the benefits of losing money through trade, seems desperate

Report Abuse
32 weeks 6 days ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

China will Win. US will win if only none of American buy the product from China.

Report Abuse
32 weeks 2 days ago
 
1
1
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/2168578/donald-trump-threatens-fresh-round-china-tariffs-he-claims

 

Bartender, another round, some people are stil standing up, I want everybody to crash.

Report Abuse
31 weeks 3 days ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://www.scmp.com/business/money/markets-investing/article/2169755/chinese-stocks-swing-gains-mild-loss-amid-new

 

Let's borrow more money on margin and make more, they always go up forever.

 

I have to pay my margin call, what is that, I have to pay more, no,no. I am supposed to make money forever and give you more to buy not pay back, who changed the rules?

 

Let's "do business", you loan me more money to pay you back, RIGHT.

Report Abuse
30 weeks 2 days ago
 
0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

https://freebeacon.com/national-security/china-targets-control-internet-things-spying-business/

 

Throw away everything and go off grid, this shit is getting scary.

Report Abuse
29 weeks 6 days ago
 
Posts: 228

Governor

0
0
You must be a registered user to vote!
You must be a registered user to vote!
0

Chairman Xi played his hand and he lost. China simply can't survive a prolonged trade war. He will lose some serious face, but he needs to bow down and do what the US wants. If he wants to bring China back to the 1960's, that's his perogative. And if the Chinese people can't understand that his policies are adversely affecting not only China, but the rest of the world, then they deserve what they get.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/07/opinion/xi-trump-trade-war-china-lead...

 

The endgame in the trade war between China and the United States seems near. President Trump, betting with real currency — American strength — apparently has the upper hand, and the concessions President Xi Jinping is likely to make won’t be mere tokens. When — if? — an agreement is finally announced, Mr. Trump will surely fire off bragging tweets, partly to shore up his credentials for a second term, amid personal and policy troubles. For Mr. Xi, almost any deal could mean a very serious loss of face.

Mr. Xi assumed power when China was still riding high on its so-called economic miracle (and the United States remained mired in the aftereffects of the 2008-9 recession). He became general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party (C.C.P.) in late 2012 and president of the People’s Republic in early 2013. His anticorruption campaign was instantly popular. He championed the “Chinese Dream,” a vague vision of prosperity, strength and well-being for the country and its people, that seemed to fire up many citizens. His proposal to President Barack Obama to establish a “New Model of Major Country Relations” could only please Han-majority Chinese with imperial yearnings.

But those were easy stunts, performed in a country with no audible opposition and that bans “reckless” talk about the government. The trade war, on the other hand, is the first real occasion to assess Mr. Xi’s leadership capabilities. And his performance might not look so good, even if one discounts the setbacks related to the trade war.

First and foremost, Mr. Xi has utterly failed to manage the United States–Chinese relationship. In contrast, every Chinese leader since the founding of the communist state in 1949 had recognized the paramount importance of those ties, worked hard to improve them — and reaped huge benefits.

 

 

Mao staged Ping-Pong diplomacy to break the ice in 1971, and President Nixon supported him in his standoff against the Soviet Union. Deng Xiaoping went all-out to woo the United States, and President Jimmy Carter switched recognition of China from Taipei to Beijing in 1979. During the 1980s, the C.C.P. leaders Hu Yaobang and Zhao Ziyang invited Milton Friedman and other American economists to visit and provide advice; after that, American capital and technology started flowing into China. In 1997, Jiang Zemin made an eight-day visit to the United States — at one point, while in Williamsburg, Va., putting on a three-cornered colonial hat. Bill Clinton then gave China a strong push to enter the World Trade Organization in 2001.

 

The Hu Jintao years, 2003–13, saw China’s most tactful exploitation of American openness (and naïveté). Cheap Chinese imports created runaway bilateral trade deficits for the United States. The Confucius Institutes, a network of language schools cum influence agencies, began to take root in American universities and high schools. (Today, there are more than 100 throughout the United States.) Chinese venture capitalists flooded Silicon Valley with money raised in American financial markets — then quietly siphoned off cutting-edge American expertise and injected it into China’s own high-tech hub.

But Mr. Xi has been aggressively hard-line. Under him, anti-American rhetoric has spread in official media. The Chinese government has been explicit about wanting to challenge the United States’s military presence in Asia. It has made aggressive moves toward Taiwan and in the South China Sea. It has sent Chinese battleships through American waters off the coast of Alaska. (It claimed to only be exercising the internationally recognized right of “innocent passage,” but the move clearly was a show of force.)

State authorities in Beijing try to co-opt members of China’s vast diaspora, hoping to develop a network that will facilitate political infiltration into other countries and high-tech transfers out of them. To this end, they resort to both overt schemes, like the Thousand Talents Plan, an official headhunting program, and covert tactics overseen by the C.C.P.’s influence machine, the United Front.

 

These efforts have set off alarms among some Americans. In 2017 and 2018, two groups of blue-ribbon scholars and ex-officials from previous United States administrations advocated a fundamental change in America’s view of China. Their members were moderates and mostly well-disposed toward China. Yet some of their recommendations dovetailed with the views of the Trump administration hawks who consider China to be America’s number-one enemy and security threat. Mr. Xi, apparently oblivious to this sea change, was caught unprepared when Mr. Trump hit China with a tariff war.

 The dispute is having a knock-on effect elsewhere in Asia, Australia and New Zealand, and Europe. After a summit in Brussels last month, China agreed to grant European Union countries “improved” market access, stop the forced transfer of technology and discuss the possibility of curtailing state subsidies to Chinese companies, which, other governments say, gives them an unfair competitive advantage. Although these concessions were presented in the mild, mutual-promise language of a joint statement, they were a clear setback for China and will blunt its global ambitions.

 

Why is all of this happening under Mr. Xi? History suggests an answer.

In the late 1950s, Mao began to challenge the Soviet Union’s leadership of the international communist movement, then a potent force that hoped to overturn the United States-led world order. Mao was also seeking global dominance, in line with the traditional concept that the emperor of the Middle Kingdom was the rightful ruler of “tian xia” (天下), everything under the heavens. But Mao overreached; China wasn’t strong enough for that then. The Soviet Union’s decision to scrap aid programs to China and pull out its scientific and technological advisers there dealt a severe blow to China’s underperforming socialist economy.

 

Like Mao with the Soviets, Mr. Xi may have challenged the global leadership of the United States too hard and too soon.

 

Mr. Xi’s second major shortcoming has been his failure to articulate a coherent set of policies to stop the Chinese economy’s long-term weakening, after many years of stellar performance. China’s gross-domestic-product growth in 2018 was the weakest in 28 years. The figure for the first quarter of this year was 6.4 percent, compared with the record high of 15.4 percent for the same period in 1993. Even that number would be the envy of many Western states, but the decline should concern China’s leadership because it underlines the country’s structural problems — notably, a rapidly graying population, a shrinking labor force and a total debt-to-G.D.P. ratio that neared 300 percent in the first quarter of 2018. The Japanese bank Nomura has estimated that defaults on bonds denominated in renminbi (also known as yuan) quadrupled between 2017 and 2018.

 

Weighed down by demographics and debt, China can hardly expand through more private investment and consumption. Worse, since its economy already has some huge excess capacities (think newly built ghost towns), government stimulus isn’t very effective. According to the International Monetary Fund, in 2008, it took one trillion yuan of credit to generate one trillion yuan of economic output; by 2017, the ratio was 3.5-to-1.

Yet Xi has done little to address these structural issues.

 

Evidence of severe demographic problems had become apparent by the late 2000s, but in 2016 Mr. Xi merely replaced the one-child policy with a two-child policy. Too little, too late. China’s number of newborns per year has dropped since the changes. The 2018 total was the lowest since 1961, a year struck by a terrible famine. Mr. Xi signed off on an economic stimulus package in 2015 that was 25 percent larger than his predecessor’s emergency plan in 2009, which had been implemented as a response to the global financial crisis. And again, in January and February of this year alone, even while Mr. Xi has been paying lip service to the need to wean the economy off state support, the government offered new loans and financing exceeding the package for all of 2015, according to an article in Forbes.

 

 

A third criticism of Mr. Xi is that under him, China has sponsored or condoned actions by Chinese citizens and entities worldwide that have damaged the country’s international reputation while degrading its own moral fabric.

Take intellectual property, for example. The United States seems to have hard evidence that it was the policy of Huawei, a flagship Chinese high-tech company, to reward employees for I.P. theft. And, as I have written before, such a policy is encouraged, arguably even mandatory, under China’s 2017 National Intelligence Law.

Traditionally, the ideal Chinese state is a Confucian state that adheres to strict moral and behavioral norms. Yet for all his cracking down on corruption at home, Mr. Xi has encouraged moral turpitude abroad; his vision of China is a nation of patriotic thieves. All Chinese arguably have lost face as a result, and now innocent people overseas may be dismissed out of hand as guilty by association.

 

Mr. Xi is widely seen as the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao. After the Constitution was amended last year, he could be president for life — unless his serious failures of leadership give his opponents at home enough reason to cut him short.

Yi-Zheng Lian, a commentator on Hong Kong and Asian affairs, is a professor of economics at Yamanashi Gakuin University, in Kofu, Japan, and a contributing opinion writer.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

  

 

Report Abuse
2 weeks 1 day ago
 
Know the answer ?
Please or register to post answer.

Report Abuse

Security Code: * Enter the text diplayed in the box below
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <img> <br> <p> <u>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Textual smileys will be replaced with graphical ones.

More information about formatting options

Forward Question

Answer of the DayMORE >>
A: well,,,  just hope all newbies in China wake up real quick to the
A:well,,,  just hope all newbies in China wake up real quick to the idea of there are not really any 'road rules',,,  so, like the little Safety Films we watched in Elementary School said when u were a kid,,,  'look both ways before u cross the street'.  dat sh*t be true here,, haha,, and don't be too surprised when u see a car driving down the sidewalk,,,  cuz long enuf here u will see it a lot...   -- diverdude1