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Q: Will University pay increase?

Howdy. I have worked at the same university in Henan for several years and normally get a 5% pay increase each year. I've been considering leaving for good but at the same time wondering if pay might increase given our current situation. My opinion is that the school will do what it normally does, which is not plan for disaster (in this case not being able to get Western teachers) and then try and deal with the problem after the fact. I'm hoping though they might anticipate having problems and thus offer more. Any experience with this or thoughts? 

3 weeks 3 days ago in  Teaching & Learning - China

 
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you are 'hoping that the uni might anticipate problems', and you have been working in China a few years???
 

One thingi learnt in China is that they never anticipate more and a few hours ahead, and can always change their mind (and not tell you) at the last minute.

the sort of forward planning that you are talking about, in my experience, does not happen in Chinese univerisites.
also, they tend to look for the cheapest alternative possible, experience notwithstanding.

 

by all means give it a go, asking for an increase, and let us know what happens (like anyone ever gives an update on this site) no

unless you have good guanxi, you are liklely to be told that your 'performance review was poor', and they are sorry (ha ha) not to renew your contract.

by all means good luck!

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3 weeks 2 days ago
 
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OT:

 

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/high-profile-australian-citizen-t...

 

China Arrests High Profile Australian Citizen & State TV Anchor Under Mysterious Circumstances

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3 weeks 3 days ago
 
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Doubtful but it really depends on your situation.  Universities usually have a rigid pay structure and if you have hit the cap or are near it you are very unlikely to get any more money.  If you ask for anything beyond that they are likely just to accept your tendered resignation. 

 

It depends on how much you currently make.  If you are already making 20% more than other similar positions you can forget it but if you are being uderpaid you have a good chance.

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3 weeks 2 days ago
 
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As you know, universities always pay less than other levels of education, and kindergarten teachers are paid a premium. That said, uni teachers do not have to work the standards 20-22 hours a week. It was also noted within this past week that China might allow foreign teachers to begin doing part-time wirk with the agreement of your full-time employer and the part-time one. I have seen an increase in salaries eing offered as schools scramble to fill their remaining teachers slots at the last minute. Beginning salaries jumped from 800-12,000 to 18,000-23,000 within the last month. ESL education is nothing more than a business, even at public schools. Supply and demand seems like it should make a difference, but in China, it is only for emergencies.

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3 weeks 2 days ago
 
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doubt it,,,,  let us know.

 

maybe covid bumped salaries overall,,, but I bet they feel like they have already 'got' you and things will carry on as normal.  I mean they will not factor in covid in your situation.  Well,, let us know.

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3 weeks 2 days ago
 
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you are 'hoping that the uni might anticipate problems', and you have been working in China a few years???
 

One thingi learnt in China is that they never anticipate more and a few hours ahead, and can always change their mind (and not tell you) at the last minute.

the sort of forward planning that you are talking about, in my experience, does not happen in Chinese univerisites.
also, they tend to look for the cheapest alternative possible, experience notwithstanding.

 

by all means give it a go, asking for an increase, and let us know what happens (like anyone ever gives an update on this site) no

unless you have good guanxi, you are liklely to be told that your 'performance review was poor', and they are sorry (ha ha) not to renew your contract.

by all means good luck!

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3 weeks 2 days ago
 
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"Any experience with this or thoughts?"

 

My thoughts are... There's no way to predict how some random manager in a random university will react to a new situation, I suspect it will be different wherever you go.

 

But, while I don't work in China now I have a lot of friends who still do - most of my best friends there are in managment positions in English schools now -  and I had several job offers not long after covid was declared a pandemic and people realised finding new teachers was going to be a nightmare. I obviously won't be taking any jobs there, assuming I ever decide to, until the borders open again.

 

What I know is this... Since the borders were closed most schools can only recruit teachers from within China, this has meant a shortage of teachers and some have quit jobs they had been in for some time to take new, better paying jobs. It wouldn't surprise me if some were actively headhunted.

 

Despite tough times for schools teachers I know have been very well looked after and some have had unexpected pay rises, presumably to keep them from jumping ship for a better paying job.

 

The jobs I was offered were paying more than the pre covid deal, they knew they had to offer more.

 

I don't know how much your university values having foreign teachers or how their system allows for management to adjust salaries as needed but I'm pretty sure there are jobs out there if you look and some are willing to pay more than pre covid rates to get teachers.

 

If I were you I'd casually tell a co-worker I was offered a great job in city X and maybe after your contract there finishes ... when it gets back to management (and it probably will) you might find you get offered more to stay.

 

 

 

 

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3 weeks 1 day ago
 
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https://www.chinalawblog.com/2019/06/do-not-teach-english-in-china-and-w...

 

Do NOT Teach English in China and Why EVERYONE Should Read This

By Dan Harris on June 19, 2019

POSTED IN  

 

If you are thinking about taking a job teaching English in China, my strong advice to you is DON’T DO IT. Just don’t. Look for such a job in Vietnam or Thailand or Japan or Spain or the Czech Republic or really just about anywhere else in the world. I say this because teaching English in China has become that corrupt, that horrible, that exploitive, and that risky.

Let me explain….

Our international lawyers have always gotten a steady stream of emails from English teachers in foreign countries who are in trouble or not getting paid. Though these matters are invariably too small for us (or just not the sort of work we handle), we do want to help to the extent we can. That “help” usually consists of an email providing “fly-by” legal or career help or even emotional support. We view helping these teachers as a bit of a public service.

In International Education: The Emails We Get, we explained how our international lawyers have inadvertently found themselves on the front lines with this, even though we have never made a single cent from representing an English teacher anywhere in the world.

A couple years ago we wrote a four part series on establishing an international school in China.

In part 1, Establishing International Schools in China: The Basics, we discussed the complications foreign parties typically see when trying to start a school in China.

In part 2, Establishing International Schools in China: A Deeper Dive, we focused on what it takes to start a School for the Children of Foreign Workers.

In part 3, Establishing International Schools in China: A Deeper Dive (Continued), we discussed Sino-Foreign Cooperative Schools and Chinese Private Schools. In this, my last post in this series, I look at future trends for international schools in China.

In Part 4, Establishing International Schools in China – Future Trends, we wrote about some of the distinctive issues foreign schools face in China. We also sometimes write about the legal issues stemming from teaching overseas. See e.g., Teaching English In China: Be Careful.

Many of our lawyers and staff attended international schools or are sons or daughters of teachers or professors. I spent my junior year of high school at Robert College in Istanbul, a year studying Spanish at LAE Madrid, and 8 months studying French at the Institut de Touraine. All three are amazing schools and these were some of the best years of my life. My father taught English Literature at a liberal arts college for 36 years. Our law firm has a long history of representing universities and international schools on their international legal work, ranging from helping them set up in foreign countries to licensing technology they’ve developed to foreign companies.

Our writings and our legal work and our various international school connections mean we get 10-20 emails every month from people teaching around the world, roughly be divided into the following four categories:

Visa issues.

Employment contract issues.

Medical and landlord issues.

Starting a school issues.

...more ...

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3 weeks 1 day ago
 
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Some great answers here. Put my feelers out yesterday and was met with indifference. I think they have budgets in place and there is not much concern for retaining people or anticipating anything beyond their immediate concerns. At least they are consistent. 

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3 weeks 18 hours ago
 
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