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Minor Official

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Q: Are two blank visa pages enough for a Z visa?

I'm currently waiting for a letter of invitation to work in China.

I took a look at my passport yesterday and realized I only have 2 blank visa pages left. Is this sufficient to at least get the visa in my passport? I've read conflicting views, although the Chinese Embassy page says one is sufficient.

A little more info: the two remaining visa pages are on non-consecutive (front to back) pages. Does this make a difference? Also, I still have the last three pages which are designated for amendments and endorsements (US passport) clear. I know these cannot be used for a visa, but can they be used for entry/exit stamps?

Thanks in advance.

2 years 13 weeks ago in  Visa & Legalities - China

 
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Posts: 9147

Emperor

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The visa application says you must have 2 blank pages, doesn't say consecutive. You can get extra pages added to your passport for a fee. The passport must be valid for six months minimum after the visa is granted.

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2 years 13 weeks ago
 
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I have just gone through this mess here and let me tell what I was told and what I had to do.  Where I live, the PSB requires three blank pages to put a new visa (resident permit) in a United States passport.  I know that the Embassy says one page and so be it but the folks at the Entry-and-Exit Bureau require three pages -- so go figure that out.  Anyway, first the trip to the nearest United States Consulate, then a three-hour wait to have 24 new visa pages added to the passport at a cost of RMB 580.00 and then the return trip home.  They will only add 24 pages at a time and only a total of 48 pages.  What Ted writes is quite true about the six months expiry date of the passport but the local PSB here insisted upon three pages.  I also know of other United States citizens here that had to amend their respective passports because they had less than three available pages.  The "endorsement" pages at the back of a United States passport do not count towards the three page minimum requirement.

 

In any case, this is where you will run into trouble :  the Embassy will enter the visa on one of the two remaining pages and you will enter China and Chinese Immigration will stamp the remaining visa page with an entry stamp.  When it comes time to enter your resident permit, you will have NO available pages and you will be forced to go running to the nearest United States Consulate / Embassy to add pages, all of this at great cost in time and money to you.  Prudence in all things.

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2 years 6 weeks ago
 
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